0
HISTORY OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION:
1648 TO PRESENT
MEETING 23:
WHAT IS TOTALITARIANISM?
Definition of Totalitarianism
First popularized by the Italian dictator, Benito
Mussolini, this term is derived from the I...
I. Soviet Union
A. The Bolsheviks and Lenin
B. Joseph Stalin
1. Economic Plans of the 1930s
a. Agriculture: Collectivizati...
Palmer Raids (1919-20)
• Attorney general A. Mitchell Palmer uses the fear of
communists and radicals to arrest thousands ...
Five Socialist Assemblymen Suspended by the New York State Legislature. Source: George
Matthew Adams Service. January 24, ...
I. Soviet Union
II. Italy
A. Postwar Discontent and Benito
Mussolini
1. Black Shirts
2. “March on Rome” (1922)
3. Seizure ...
What is Fascism? (1932)
“Fascism, the more it considers and observes
the future and the development of humanity
quite apar...
I. Soviet Union
II. Italy
A. Postwar Discontent and Benito Mussolini
1. Black Shirts
2. Principles of Fascism
A. Imperiali...
I. Soviet Union
II. Italy
III. Germany
A. Instability in Weimar and Political Parties
Social Democrats
(SPD)
Communists (K...
I. Soviet Union
II. Italy
III. Germany
A. Instability in Weimar and Political Parties
B. Cultural Critics on the Right
1. ...
I. Soviet Union
II. Italy
III. Germany
A. Instability in Weimar
and Political Parties
B. Cultural Critics on the
Right
C. ...
I. Soviet Union
II. Italy
III. Germany
IV. The Great Depression
A. Stock Market Speculation
1. Buying stock “on margin” (o...
Why was Hitler Elected?
http://vimeo.com/4861637
I. Soviet Union
II. Italy
III. Germany
IV. The Great Depression
V. Nazi Propaganda
A. Instability in Weimar and Political ...
Deutsche Volksempfänger (The People’s Receiver)
Propaganda Poster encouraging the use of the
Volksempfänger (1936)
Albert Speer. Zeppelin Field, Nuremberg, Bavaria, Germany.
1934-7. photograph, ca. 1938. Stadtarchiv Nuremberg
Pergamon Al...
The Autobahn
Hitler and Ferdinand Porsche look at the Volkswagon in 1936.
From Karlsruhe (November 1938)
Jugend dient dem Führer [Youth Serves the Fuhrer]. 1939. 85.6 x 58.9 cm. Deutsches Historisches Museum,
Berlin. P 63/809 a...
Hubert Lanzinger. Der Bannerträger. [The Flag Bearer]. 1938.
German War Art Collection, U.S. Army Center of Military Histo...
Nazi Toy Soldiers. Ca 1930s. <http://www.museumofworldwarii.com/TourText/Area02_RiseofNazism.htm>
Swastika Light Bulb. Ca 1930s.
<http://www.museumofworldwarii.com/TourText/Area02_RiseofNazism.htm>
Film: Triumph of the Will (1934) by Leni Riefenstahl
I. Soviet Union
II. Italy
III. Germany
IV. The Great Depression
V. Nazi Propaganda
VI. A Case Study in Historical Searching
H114 Meeting 23: What is Totalitarianism?
H114 Meeting 23: What is Totalitarianism?
H114 Meeting 23: What is Totalitarianism?
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

H114 Meeting 23: What is Totalitarianism?

860

Published on

Published in: Education, News & Politics
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
860
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
7
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "H114 Meeting 23: What is Totalitarianism?"

  1. 1. HISTORY OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION: 1648 TO PRESENT MEETING 23: WHAT IS TOTALITARIANISM?
  2. 2. Definition of Totalitarianism First popularized by the Italian dictator, Benito Mussolini, this term is derived from the Italian totalitarismo. It indicates a totality of control by the state. This implies a relationship in which the state through its instruments dominates society. Hence in the totalitarian state all political, economic, social, cultural and intellectual activities should be directed towards fulfilling the aims of the state. Totalitarianism. (1999). In The Blackwell Dictionary of Political Science. Oxford: Blackwell Publishers. Retrieved November 14, 2008, from http://www.credoreference.com/entry/725883/.
  3. 3. I. Soviet Union A. The Bolsheviks and Lenin B. Joseph Stalin 1. Economic Plans of the 1930s a. Agriculture: Collectivization b. Industry: Growth and infrastructure 2. Totalitarianism a. Secret Police b. Gulags c. Great Purges C. Europe and the “Red Scare”
  4. 4. Palmer Raids (1919-20) • Attorney general A. Mitchell Palmer uses the fear of communists and radicals to arrest thousands of immigrants (both citizen and non-citizen) Francis Fisher Kane, the U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania criticized the raids: "It seems to me that the policy of raids against large numbers of individuals is generally unwise and very apt to result in injustice. People not really guilty are likely to be arrested and railroaded through their hearings....We appear to be attempting to repress a political party....By such methods we drive underground and make dangerous what was not dangerous before.” (New York Times: "Palmer Upholds Red Repression," January 24, 1920) Palmer responded in The Washington Post: "There is no time to waste on hairsplitting over infringement of liberties." (Washington Post, "The Red Assassins," January 4, 1920)
  5. 5. Five Socialist Assemblymen Suspended by the New York State Legislature. Source: George Matthew Adams Service. January 24, 1920 5 New York State Assembly Members suspended and dismissed from their seats in a 140 to 6 vote in 1920.
  6. 6. I. Soviet Union II. Italy A. Postwar Discontent and Benito Mussolini 1. Black Shirts 2. “March on Rome” (1922) 3. Seizure of Power (1924) 4. Principles of Fascism Portrait of Benito Mussolini. 24 May 1923. Original caption: Photo shows Benito Mussolini, acclaimed as the "Theodore Roosevelt" of Italy, caught by the camera in a rather picturesque pose in Rome, during the recent visit of the British Royal Family. © Bettmann/CORBIS
  7. 7. What is Fascism? (1932) “Fascism, the more it considers and observes the future and the development of humanity quite apart from political considerations of the moment, believes neither in the possibility nor the utility of perpetual peace. It thus repudiates the doctrine of Pacifism . . . . The foundation of Fascism is the conception of the State, its character, its duty, and its aim. Fascism conceives of the State as an absolute, in comparison with which all individuals or groups are relative, only to be conceived of in their relation to the State . . . . The Fascist State organizes the nation, but leaves a sufficient margin of liberty to the individual; the latter is deprived of all useless and possibly harmful freedom, but retains what is essential; the deciding power in this question cannot be the individual, but the State alone . . . . For Fascism, the growth of empire, that is to say the expansion of the nation, is an essential manifestation of vitality.” Benito Mussolini. 1934. photograph. © Hulton- Deutsch Collection/CORBIS
  8. 8. I. Soviet Union II. Italy A. Postwar Discontent and Benito Mussolini 1. Black Shirts 2. Principles of Fascism A. Imperialism and Ethiopia (1935-36) 1. Haile Selassie 2. “The Roman legionnaires are again on the march.” Haile Selassie at League of Nations (Geneva, Switzerland) in 1936.
  9. 9. I. Soviet Union II. Italy III. Germany A. Instability in Weimar and Political Parties Social Democrats (SPD) Communists (KPD) German National People’s Party (DNVP) National Socialists/Nazis (NSDAP) Catholic Center Party (Zentrum)
  10. 10. I. Soviet Union II. Italy III. Germany A. Instability in Weimar and Political Parties B. Cultural Critics on the Right 1. Nationalism 2. Traditionalism 3. Anti-communism
  11. 11. I. Soviet Union II. Italy III. Germany A. Instability in Weimar and Political Parties B. Cultural Critics on the Right C. Hitler’s Rise to Power 1. WWI experience 2. Beer Hall Putsch and Mein Kampf (1923) 3. Nazi Ideology: volk, nationalism, anticommunism, antisemitism, militarism, lebensraum, “stab in the back” Adolf Hitler at a rally in the Munich Odeonsplatz to celebrate the declaration of war in 1914. (August 2, 1914)
  12. 12. I. Soviet Union II. Italy III. Germany IV. The Great Depression A. Stock Market Speculation 1. Buying stock “on margin” (on credit) 2. Stock market crash bankrupts investors A. Financial Panic 1. Withdraw savings from banks 2. Recall of private short term loans A. Mass Unemployment
  13. 13. Why was Hitler Elected? http://vimeo.com/4861637
  14. 14. I. Soviet Union II. Italy III. Germany IV. The Great Depression V. Nazi Propaganda A. Instability in Weimar and Political Parties B. Cultural Critics on the Right C. Hitler’s Rise to Power D. The Nazi Cultural Program
  15. 15. Deutsche Volksempfänger (The People’s Receiver) Propaganda Poster encouraging the use of the Volksempfänger (1936)
  16. 16. Albert Speer. Zeppelin Field, Nuremberg, Bavaria, Germany. 1934-7. photograph, ca. 1938. Stadtarchiv Nuremberg Pergamon Altar. 2nd century BCE. Pergamon Museum, Berlin.
  17. 17. The Autobahn Hitler and Ferdinand Porsche look at the Volkswagon in 1936. From Karlsruhe (November 1938)
  18. 18. Jugend dient dem Führer [Youth Serves the Fuhrer]. 1939. 85.6 x 58.9 cm. Deutsches Historisches Museum, Berlin. P 63/809 and 1990/534
  19. 19. Hubert Lanzinger. Der Bannerträger. [The Flag Bearer]. 1938. German War Art Collection, U.S. Army Center of Military History, Army Art Collection, Washington, D.C.
  20. 20. Nazi Toy Soldiers. Ca 1930s. <http://www.museumofworldwarii.com/TourText/Area02_RiseofNazism.htm>
  21. 21. Swastika Light Bulb. Ca 1930s. <http://www.museumofworldwarii.com/TourText/Area02_RiseofNazism.htm>
  22. 22. Film: Triumph of the Will (1934) by Leni Riefenstahl
  23. 23. I. Soviet Union II. Italy III. Germany IV. The Great Depression V. Nazi Propaganda VI. A Case Study in Historical Searching
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×