JAGANNATH UNIVERSITY
SUBMITTED BY:
KANDARPI SARKAR
NIKITA THAKUR
KUNAL SINGH
NEETIKA AGARWAL
SUBMITTED TO:
AR. ABHISHEK SH...
PETER EISEMAN
EARLY LIFE
 Peter Eisenman (born August 11, 1932) is an
American architect. Eisenman's professional work is
often referre...
EDUCATION
Eisenman was born in Newark. As a child he attended Columbia
High School located in Maplewood, New Jersey. He di...
PRACTICE
 Eisenman first rose to prominence as a member of the New York
Five (also known as the Whites, as opposed to the...
BUILDINGS AND WORKS
FALK HOUSE ,HARDWICK ,VEDMONT, 1969
House VI (Frank
residence), Cornwall, Connecticut, Design: 1972....
FALK HOUSE
Peter Eisenman. Conceptual sketch, Falk House (House II), Hardwick, Vermont.
1969-1970. Black ink on off-white ...
Building views
The house is situated on the highest
point of 100 acres site with
panoramic views on the three side
which e...
c
o
n
c
e
p
t
u
a
l
S
K
E
C
T
H
E
s
Floor plans
One of the most interesting aspects of House II is the initial reading of a whole
formal system that is deform...
elevations
sections
CONCEPTUAL
MODELS
HOUSE VI
 House VI, or the Frank
Residence, is a significant building
designed by Peter
Eisenman, completed in 1975
 At ...
c
o
n
c
e
p
t
u
a
l
S
K
E
C
T
H
E
s
Building views
Floor plans
The building is meant to be a "record of design process," where the structure
that results is the methodical m...
elevations
sections
INTERIOR VIEWS
INSTEAD OF SELECTING OF ANY
OBVIOUS SITE ON CAMPUS
A SITE WAS CREATED BY LOCATING THE
CENTER BETWEEN SEVERAL
PROPOSED
SITE...
 THE SCAFFOLDING CONSIST OF TWO
INTERSECTING THREE DIMENSIONAL
GRIDED CORRIDOR WHICH LINK EXISTING
BUILDING WITH THE NEW ...
Floor plans
elevations
sections
VIEW FROM THE SCAFFOLDING
CORRIDOR
SECTION THROUGH LOBBY
, VIEW FROM EAST
Dame Zaha Mohammad Hadid
EARLY LIFE
Zaha Hadid was born on 31 October 1950 in
Baghdad, Iraq.
She grew up in one of Baghdad's first Bauhaus-inspir...
 She worked for her former professors, Koolhaas and
Zenghelis, at the Office for Metropolitan Architecture, in
Rotterdam,...
Zaha Hadid is an Iraqi-British architect.
She received the Pritzker Architecture Prize in 2004—the
first woman to do so—...
 In 2004, Hadid became the first female and first Muslim recipient of the
Pritzker Architecture Prize, architecture's equ...
BMW CENTRAL BUILDING….
BMW Central Building
 The BMW Central Building Located in Leipzig, Germany was the
winning design submitted for competition by Pritzker Prize ...
 Serving 5,500 employees, the building functions as the most
important piece of the factory, connecting the three product...
 Not only is the Central Building an office building and public relations
center for the factory, it is also a very impor...
Diagrammatic Plan Of BMW Central
Building Productions Sheds
MAXXI Rome
Location Roma, Lazio, Italy
The project was first announced in 1998 and took over 10 years
to complete
the design of Zaha Hadid was the winner of an...
The MAXXI – National Museum of the 21st Century
Arts is a museum dedicated to contemporary
creativity, located in the Fla...
The architecture of Eisenman had many different
angles and difficulties when analyzing it and trying
to describe it in ge...
THANK YOU
Peter eiseman works and theory on deconstructive architecture
Peter eiseman works and theory on deconstructive architecture
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Peter eiseman works and theory on deconstructive architecture

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the work of peter eiseman and theory of his initial thoughts on house he built and buildings like wexener art museum...

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Peter eiseman works and theory on deconstructive architecture

  1. 1. JAGANNATH UNIVERSITY SUBMITTED BY: KANDARPI SARKAR NIKITA THAKUR KUNAL SINGH NEETIKA AGARWAL SUBMITTED TO: AR. ABHISHEK SHRIVASTAVA Faculty of architecture Presentation on deconstructive architecture…….
  2. 2. PETER EISEMAN
  3. 3. EARLY LIFE  Peter Eisenman (born August 11, 1932) is an American architect. Eisenman's professional work is often referred to as formalist, deconstructive, late avant-garde, late or high modernist, etc. A certain fragmenting of forms visible in some of Eisenman's projects has been identified as characteristic of an eclectic group of architects that were (self-)labeled as deconstructivists, and who were featured in an exhibition by the same name at the Museum of Modern Art. The heading also refers to the storied relationship and collaborations between Peter Eisenman and post-structuralist thinker Jacques Derrida.
  4. 4. EDUCATION Eisenman was born in Newark. As a child he attended Columbia High School located in Maplewood, New Jersey. He discovered architecture as an undergraduate at Cornell University and gave up his position on the swimming team in order to immerse himself in the architecture program there. Eisenman received a Bachelor of Architecture Degree from Cornell, a Master of Architecture Degree from Columbia University's Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation, and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Cambridge. He received an honorary degree from Syracuse University School of Architecture in 2007.
  5. 5. PRACTICE  Eisenman first rose to prominence as a member of the New York Five (also known as the Whites, as opposed to the Grays of Yale: Robert A.M. Stern, Charles Moore, etc.), five architects (Eisenman, Charles Gwathmey, John Hejduk, Richard Meier, and Michael Graves) some of whose work was presented at a CASE Studies conference in 1967.  n 1980 Eisenman established a professional practice in New York City. He embarked on a number of major projects, characterized by disconcerting forms, angles, and materials, including the Wexner Center for the Arts (1983–89) at the Ohio State University in Columbus, the Greater Columbus (Ohio) Convention Center (1993), and the Aronoff Center for Design and Art (1996) at the University of Cincinnati (Ohio).
  6. 6. BUILDINGS AND WORKS FALK HOUSE ,HARDWICK ,VEDMONT, 1969 House VI (Frank residence), Cornwall, Connecticut, Design: 1972. Wexner Center for the Arts, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. 1989 UNIVERSITY ARTS MUSEUM.
  7. 7. FALK HOUSE Peter Eisenman. Conceptual sketch, Falk House (House II), Hardwick, Vermont. 1969-1970. Black ink on off-white paper, 21.5 x 28 cm. Peter Eisenman fonds.
  8. 8. Building views The house is situated on the highest point of 100 acres site with panoramic views on the three side which extended through 2o miles. The design simulates the presence of tree and hedges Which are non existing on the barren hilltop , through A sequence of columns and And wall
  9. 9. c o n c e p t u a l S K E C T H E s
  10. 10. Floor plans One of the most interesting aspects of House II is the initial reading of a whole formal system that is deformed by the relationship between an internal generic system and externally imposed formal vector. This deformation, which responds to the relationship between general and specific form, defines one of the most important parts of the house: the entrance device. From the definition of the entrance device, all the formal solutions for each space of House II can be inferred.
  11. 11. elevations sections
  12. 12. CONCEPTUAL MODELS
  13. 13. HOUSE VI  House VI, or the Frank Residence, is a significant building designed by Peter Eisenman, completed in 1975  At the time of construction, the architect was known almost exclusively as a theorist and "paper architect," promulgating a highly formalist approach toarchitecture he calls "postfunctionalism." Rather than form following function or an aesthetic design, the design emerged from a conceptual process, and remains pinned to that conceptual framework..
  14. 14. c o n c e p t u a l S K E C T H E s
  15. 15. Building views
  16. 16. Floor plans The building is meant to be a "record of design process," where the structure that results is the methodical manipulation of a grid. To start, Eisenman created a form from the intersection of four planes, subsequently manipulating the structures again and again, until coherent spaces began to emerge.
  17. 17. elevations sections
  18. 18. INTERIOR VIEWS
  19. 19. INSTEAD OF SELECTING OF ANY OBVIOUS SITE ON CAMPUS A SITE WAS CREATED BY LOCATING THE CENTER BETWEEN SEVERAL PROPOSED SITE AND EXIXTING BUILDINGS. THIS CAN BE DESCRIBED AS A NON BUILDING, A ARCHAEOLOGICAL EARTHWORK WHOSE ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS ARE SCAFFOLDING AND LANDSCAPING. Wexner Center for the Arts
  20. 20.  THE SCAFFOLDING CONSIST OF TWO INTERSECTING THREE DIMENSIONAL GRIDED CORRIDOR WHICH LINK EXISTING BUILDING WITH THE NEW GALLERIES AND ART FACILITIES.  ONE PART OF SCAFFOLDING IS ALIGNED WITH COLOUMN GRID AND THE OTHER WITH THE CAMPUS GRID CONCEPTUAL SKETCHES.
  21. 21. Floor plans
  22. 22. elevations
  23. 23. sections VIEW FROM THE SCAFFOLDING CORRIDOR
  24. 24. SECTION THROUGH LOBBY , VIEW FROM EAST
  25. 25. Dame Zaha Mohammad Hadid
  26. 26. EARLY LIFE Zaha Hadid was born on 31 October 1950 in Baghdad, Iraq. She grew up in one of Baghdad's first Bauhaus-inspired buildings during an era in which "modernism connoted glamor and progressive thinking" in the Middle East. She received a degree in mathematics from the American University of Beirut before moving to study at the Architectural Association School of Architecture in London where she met Rem Koolhaas, Elia Zenghelis, and Bernard Tschumi.
  27. 27.  She worked for her former professors, Koolhaas and Zenghelis, at the Office for Metropolitan Architecture, in Rotterdam, the Netherlands; she became a partner in 1977. Through her association with Koolhaas, she met Peter Rice, the engineer who gave her support and encouragement early on at a time when her work seemed difficult. In 1980, she established her own London-based practice. During the 1980s, she also taught at the Architectural Association.
  28. 28. Zaha Hadid is an Iraqi-British architect. She received the Pritzker Architecture Prize in 2004—the first woman to do so—and the Stirling Prize in 2010 and 2011. Her buildings are distinctively futuristic. Characterized by the "powerful, curving forms of her elongated structures"with "multiple perspective points and fragmented geometry to evoke the chaos of modern life"
  29. 29.  In 2004, Hadid became the first female and first Muslim recipient of the Pritzker Architecture Prize, architecture's equivalent of the Nobel Prize.  She is a member of the editorial board of the Encyclopædia Britannica.  In 2006, she was honoured with a retrospective spanning her entire work at the Guggenheim Museum in New York; that year she also received an Honorary Degree from the American University of Beirut.  Her architectural design firm, Zaha Hadid Architects, employs more than 350 people, and is headquartered in a Victorian former school building in Clerkenwell, London.  In 2008, she ranked 69th on the Forbes list of "The World's 100 Most Powerful Women".
  30. 30. BMW CENTRAL BUILDING…. BMW Central Building
  31. 31.  The BMW Central Building Located in Leipzig, Germany was the winning design submitted for competition by Pritzker Prize winning architect, Zaha Hadid.  The central building is the nerve center for BMW's new $1.55 billion complex built to manufacture the BMW 3 Series Vehicle.  From a pool of 25 international architects the BMW jury chose the very innovative design of Zaha Hadid as the final piece of the BMW plant in Leipzig, Germany.  With no real precedent for her design, Zaha Hadid's Central Building can only be related to the revolutionary and monumental industrial designs of the past.
  32. 32.  Serving 5,500 employees, the building functions as the most important piece of the factory, connecting the three production sheds.  Each day, 650 BMW 3 Series sedans pass through the Central Building on an elevated conveyor as they move from one of the three production sheds to the next.  Dim blue LED lights highlight the vehicles after each stage, as they exit one of the sheds.  These conveyors not only take the vehicles from one production shed to another, but do so directly through all of the functional spaces of the Central Building. The offices, meeting rooms, and public relations facilities are all built around these elevated conveyors, creating an interesting relationship between the employees, the cars, and the public.
  33. 33.  Not only is the Central Building an office building and public relations center for the factory, it is also a very important piece of the production process at the factory. All of the load-bearing walls, floors, and office levels are made of cast-in-place concrete, while the roof structure is composed of structural steel beams and space frame construction. The facade is clad in simple materials of like corrugated metal, channel glass, and glass curtain walls .  The buildings has received numerous architectural awards, including a 2006 RIBA European Award, and was placed on the shortlist for the Stirling Prize.
  34. 34. Diagrammatic Plan Of BMW Central Building Productions Sheds
  35. 35. MAXXI Rome Location Roma, Lazio, Italy
  36. 36. The project was first announced in 1998 and took over 10 years to complete the design of Zaha Hadid was the winner of an international design competition The building is a composition of bending oblong tubes, overlapping, intersecting and piling over each other, resembling a piece of massive transport infrastructure. The MAXXI consists of two museums: "MAXXI art" and "MAXXI architecture". In addition to the two museums, the MAXXI also features an auditorium, a library and media library specialized in art and architecture, a bookshop, a cafeteria, a bar/restaurant, galleries for temporary exhibition, performances, educational activities. The large public square designed in front of the museum is planned to host art works and live events.
  37. 37. The MAXXI – National Museum of the 21st Century Arts is a museum dedicated to contemporary creativity, located in the Flaminio neighbourhood of Rome, Italy.  managed by a foundation created by the Italian Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Activities. was designed as a multidisciplinary space and committed to experimentation and innovation in the arts and architecture.  The way the building extends into disappearing brushstrokes leaves us curious as to where the building ends and begins, another way in which Hadid is controlling and manipulating our understanding of space.
  38. 38. The architecture of Eisenman had many different angles and difficulties when analyzing it and trying to describe it in general terms. Conclusion “forms are no longer a ‘means toward an end,’ but an end in themselves”
  39. 39. THANK YOU

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