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le corbusier principles

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  • 1. JAGANNATH UNIVERSITY FACUTLY OF ARCHITECTURE PRESENTATION ON LE CORBUSIER
  • 2. Le Corbusier Charles-Edouard Jeanneret, better known as Le Corbusier. He was born in Switzerland and became a French citizen in 1930. October 6, 1887 – August 27, 1965) He was architect ,designer urbanist and writer. His career spanned five decades, with his buildings constructed throughout Europe, India and America.
  • 3. EARLY LIFE AND CARRER(1914-1930)Le Corbusier taught at his old school in La- chaux-de-Fond during World War I. Until the end of the first world war he worked in switzerland. Were he worked on theoretical architectural studies using modern techniques. Among these was his project for the Domino House (1914–1915)
  • 4.  In 1908, He studied architecture in Vienna with Josef Hoffmann. Between October 1910 and March 1911, he worked near Berlin for the renowned architect Peter Behrens. Soon he would begin his own architectural practice with his cousin, Pierre Jeanneret (1896– 1967), a partnership that would last until the 1950s.In 1918, Le Corbusier met the Cubist painter Amédée Ozenfant.
  • 5.  After World War II, Le Corbusier attempted to realize his urban planning schemes on a small scale by constructing a series of "unités" (the housing block unit of the Radiant City) around France. The most famous of these was the Unité dHabitation of Marseilles (1946–1952). In the 1950s, a unique opportunity to translate the Radiant City on a grand scale presented itself in the construction of the Union Territory Chandigarh. The new capital of Indian states of Punjab and Haryana and the first planned city in India. Unité dHabitation France Le corbusier Marseille or Cité Radieuse .
  • 6. LE CORBUSIER – THE MODULAR Le Corbusier explicitly used the golden ratio in his Modulor system for the scale of architectural proportion. The Modulor is an anthropometric scale of pr oportions devised by him. It is based on the height of an English man with his arm raised.
  • 7. INFLUENCES He saw this system as a continuation of the long tradition of Vitruvius, Leonardo da Vincis and , the work of Leon Battista Alberti. They used the proportions of the human body to improve the appearance and function of architecture. Le Corbusier described it as a "range of harmonious measurements to suit the human scale, universally applicable to
  • 8. BUILDING WITH MODULARSYSTEM Unité dHabitation in Marseilles Church of Sainte Marie de La Tourette Carpenter Centre for the Visual Arts
  • 9. CHANDIGARH PLANNING Historical Background Selection of site Planning To select a suitable site, the Govt. of Punjab appointed a Committee in 1948 under the Chairmanship of P.L Verma, Chief Engineer to assess and evaluate the existing towns in the State for setting up the proposed capital of
  • 10.  The present site was selected in 1948 taking into account various attributes such as its Central location in the state, proximity to the national capital & availability of sufficient water supply, fertile of soil, gradient of land for natural drainage. An American Firm, M/s. Mayer, Whittlessay and Glass was commissioned in 1950 to prepare the Master Plan for the new City Albert Mayer and Mathew Novicki evolved a fan shaped Master Plan and worked out conceptual sketches of the super block. The super block was designed as a self –sufficient neighborhood units placed along the curvilinear roads and comprised of cluster type housing, markets and centrally located open spaces.
  • 11. Le Corbusiers Master Plan The Master plan prepared by Le Corbusier was broadly similar to the one prepared by the team of planners led by Albert Mayer and Mathew Novicki. Except that the shape of the city plan was modified from one with a curving road network to rectangular shape with a grid iron pattern for the fast traffic roads, besides reducing its area for reason of economy.
  • 12.  Due to economic constraints, the master plan was to be realized in two phases, catering to a total population of half a million. . Phase-I consisting of 30 low density sector spread over an area of 9000 acres (Sector 1 to 30) for 1,50,000 people . Phase-II consisting of 17 considerably high density Sectors ( Sectors 31 to 47) spread over an area of 6000 acres for a population of 3,50,000.
  • 13.  The primary module of city‟s design is a Sector, a neighborhood unit of size 800 meters x 1200 meters. It is a self-sufficient unit having shops, school, health centers and places of recreations and worship. The population of a sector varies between 3000 and 20000 depending upon the sizes of plots and the topography of the area.
  • 14. The open hand The Open Hand (La Main Ouverte) is a recurring motif in Le Corbusiers architecture. This is a sign of relief and reconciliation. It is open to give and open to receive. The largest of the many Open Hand sculptures that Le Corbusier created is a The Open Hand Monument in 28 meter high version in Chandigarh, Chandigarh India. , India
  • 15. Buildings by le corbusier beforeChandigarh planning.  Villa Roche.  Pavillon Suisse (Swiss Pavilion).
  • 16. location Paris functionVILLA ROCHE private house, museum, galleryProject Year: 1923-1925 The Villa La Roche is a perfect showcase for Le Corbusiers new architecture. The house would serve as a private gallery to display La Roches extensive art collection.
  • 17.  The Villa acted as an exhibition space for Mr. Roche‟s collection of avant-garde artwork, and is a pure assemblage of spatial volumes that interlocks the dual programs of domicile and gallery. It including a north orientation and existing trees and height and boundary limitation. Inside the building, to display the art, an „architectural promenade‟ was made. A theme inspired by Le Corbusiers visit to the Acropolis in 1911. The promenade goes up and down staircases, leads through tight spaces, in-between balconies, open surveys, down ramps and into a beautifully lit library.
  • 18. INTERIOR OF VILLA ROCHE
  • 19. BUILDING FEATURES OF VILLA ROCHE. The Villa was imagined as a “spatial experience” and consists of a specifically deliberate path which guides the inhabitant and unveils the artwork as an itinerary through history. The promenade lead us into a succession of wonderfully illuminated spaces which were perceptibly designed to be experiential and viewed from a single, fixed point. Precisely placed wall openings, stairs, ramps, and balconies divide the space into three dimensional grid-like layers which are permeable to stunning illumination. In contrast to the entirely white façade, the vivid internal color palate harmonizes the otherwise asymmetrical arrangement of the Villa.
  • 20. Pavillon Suisse (Swiss Pavilion)Pavillon Suisse (Swiss Pavilion)7 boulevard Jourdan75014 ParisFrance Citi university was founded in 1921 to provide accommodation and support for foreign students in Paris.
  • 21. BUILDING DETAILS The free facade and horizontal window have become a continuous glazed curtain wall, on the south side of the building. The pilotis have developed from thin columns to six massive reinforcedconcrete. The plan accommodates them in a separate block sitting on the earth. its curvaceous form contrasting with thesimple slab of the studentaccommodation.
  • 22.  Building form The work consists of two volumes clearly differentiated. On the one hand, the flag-shaped parallelepiped containing the student dormitories, and the other containing the free areas of reunion, all the individual spaces and the social space . The volume of rooms is separated from the soil through large columns of concrete.
  • 23.  StructureSystem of beams andcolumns of reinforcedconcrete. Materials Concrete, stone and glass.
  • 24. MILL OWNERS ASSOCIATION BUILDING location Ahmedabad function auditorium, meeting room, office A ceremonial ramp makes for a grand approach into a triple- height entrance hall. Arrival is on the first floor, where (as per the original design) the executives‟ offices and boardroom are located
  • 25. Building characteristic The ground floor houses the work spaces of the clerks and a separate, single-storey canteen at the rear. On the third floor is a high, top-lit auditorium with a roof canopy and a curved, enclosing wall, in addition to a generous lobby. The east and west façades are in the form of sun breakers , one of Corbusier‟s many formal inventions. while avoiding harsh sun, permit visual connection and air movement.
  • 26.  On the second floor of the Mill Owners‟ Building, the lobby is treated as “an open space defined by harsh, angular forms. And the auditorium as an enclosed space delineated by soft, curvilinear forms. While the brise-soleil act as free facades made of rough shuttered concrete, the north and south sides, built in rough brickwork, are almost unbroken.
  • 27. SECRETARIAT BUILDING location Chandigarh function government The Secretariat building is a long, horizontal concrete slab form, 254 meters long and 42 meters high
  • 28.  The building is composed of block divided by expansion joints and measures over 800 feet long, bookended by two sculptural ramps providing vertical circulation throughout the facilities‟ levels. The massive, horizontal complex is comprised of 8 stories of rough-cast concrete. The building has notable similarities with Corbusier‟s Marseille block and had an equally lofty goal: to revolutionize the modern office building.
  • 29.  The whole structure is constructed in „beton brut‟ (rough- cast concrete) with Corbusier‟s signature „brise-soleils‟ facade. Over 800 feet long, the extensive facade of the building gives a sculptural aesthetic with exposed concrete ramps, punctured with small square windows dictating the front and rear views The cafeteria rests atop the terrace, where one can have a spectacular view of the city.
  • 30.  Similarly, the roof garden and its promenade set against the surrounding landscape, which constantly changes as the observer‟s angle of vision changes.. To maximize natural lighting and increase cross- ventilation, a long and narrow plan was implemented. The Secretariat is a simpler and more conventional form where variations of structure and internal distribution do not interrupt its compact volume.
  • 31. FAMOUS QUOTES BYLE CORBUSIER “To create architecture is to put in order. Put what in order? Function and objects.” Space and light and order. Those are the things that men need just as much as they need bread or a place to sleep.” A house is a machine for living in.”
  • 32. Thank you