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Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers
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Putting the "C" in WCAG: accessibility for web writers

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Your intranet or web templates might be accessible, but what happens when authors put content in them? Even within the controlled environment of a content management system, writers can affect your …

Your intranet or web templates might be accessible, but what happens when authors put content in them? Even within the controlled environment of a content management system, writers can affect your compliance with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines. In this session, we'll walk through the WCAG 2.0 guidelines that writers need to be aware of.

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  • See: http://www.w3.org/TR/UNDERSTANDING-WCAG20/content-structure-separation-understanding.html
  • See: http://www.w3.org/TR/UNDERSTANDING-WCAG20/meaning-other-lang-id.html
  • See: http://www.w3.org/TR/UNDERSTANDING-WCAG20/meaning-idioms.html
  • A better approach is to rewrite the content, avoiding non-literal language.
  • See: http://www.w3.org/TR/UNDERSTANDING-WCAG20/meaning-located.html
  • See: http://www.w3.org/TR/UNDERSTANDING-WCAG20/meaning-supplements.html
  • See: http://www.w3.org/TR/UNDERSTANDING-WCAG20/meaning-pronunciation.html
  • See: http://www.w3.org/TR/UNDERSTANDING-WCAG20/text-equiv-all.html
  • See: http://www.w3.org/TR/UNDERSTANDING-WCAG20/visual-audio-contrast-without-color.html
  • See: http://www.w3.org/TR/UNDERSTANDING-WCAG20/visual-audio-contrast-contrast.html and http://www.w3.org/TR/UNDERSTANDING-WCAG20/visual-audio-contrast7.html
  • You can read an article and see some examples here: http://www.4syllables.com.au/2011/05/accessibility-web-writers-part-6/
  • See: http://www.w3.org/TR/UNDERSTANDING-WCAG20/visual-audio-contrast-text-presentation.html and http://www.w3.org/TR/UNDERSTANDING-WCAG20/visual-audio-contrast-text-images.html
  • See: http://www.w3.org/TR/UNDERSTANDING-WCAG20/consistent-behavior-consistent-functionality.html
  • See: http://www.w3.org/TR/UNDERSTANDING-WCAG20/content-structure-separation-programmatic.html
  • The example shows a home page where there are clearly a series of headings visible. However, the underlying markup only reveals a main heading (h1) and a heading level 4 (h4)
  • See: http://www.w3.org/TR/UNDERSTANDING-WCAG20/navigation-mechanisms-descriptive.html
  • See: http://www.w3.org/TR/UNDERSTANDING-WCAG20/navigation-mechanisms-title.html
  • See: http://www.w3.org/TR/UNDERSTANDING-WCAG20/navigation-mechanisms-refs.html and http://www.w3.org/TR/UNDERSTANDING-WCAG20/navigation-mechanisms-link.html To hear how a screen reader user might struggle with poorly labelled links, see: http:// www.youtube.com/watch?v =bQpNYDvQ010
  • See the AGIMO position on PDF: http://webguide.gov.au/accessibility-usability/accessibility/pdf-accessibility/
  • See the Australian Human Rights Commission’s position on PDF: http://www.hreoc.gov.au/disability_rights/standards/www_3/www_3.html
  • WCAG 2.0 PDF techniques (draft) are available at: http://www.w3.org/WAI/GL/WCAG20-TECHS/pdf.html
  • Transcript

    • 1. <ul><li>Putting the &apos;C&apos; in WCAG Writers and web accessibility </li></ul>Intranet Leadership Forum Melbourne June 8, 2011
    • 2. Why we need a focus on writers <ul><li>Your intranet templates might be accessible, but what happens when authors add or link to content in them? </li></ul><ul><li>Even within the controlled environment of a content management system, writers can affect your compliance with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines. </li></ul>
    • 3. 19 WCAG guidelines relevant to writers <ul><li>5 areas affected </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Written content </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Non-text, visual content </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Structure and formatting </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Navigation </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Content type (technology) </li></ul></ul></ul>
    • 4. 1. Written content <ul><li>6 WCAG 2.0 guidelines relate to written content </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1.3.3 Sensory characteristics </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>3.1.2 Language of parts </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>3.1.3 Unusual words </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>3.1.4 Abbreviations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>3.1.5 Reading level </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>3.1.6 Pronunciation </li></ul></ul>
    • 5. Sensory characteristics (1.3.3) A <ul><li>Instructions for using or understanding content should not rely on shape, size, location, orientation or sound </li></ul>
    • 6. <ul><li>Here’s an example from Victoria Online website (content now removed). The text said: “How to browse. Click on a sub-topic on the left to narrow your selection”. </li></ul><ul><li>Another example on the same page was better because it identified a heading to help guide a user who may not be able to tell where (left or right on the screen) to find the content. The text says “The ‘Also of interest’ and ‘Related queries’ links at the right will take you directly to the most popular websites and searches. </li></ul>
    • 7. Language of parts (3.1.2) AA <ul><li>Foreign language terms or phrases can be handled by different user agents and assistive technology </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Use markup to identify terms/phrases </li></ul></ul>
    • 8. <ul><li>Instructions from Wikipedia advise authors that “Wikipedia prefers italics for phrases in other languages and for isolated foreign words that do not yet have everyday use in non-specialised English”. </li></ul><ul><li>Beneath that is an example from the WCAG 2.0 techniques showing how to mark up a blockquote using the xml:lang attribute to define a foreign language quotation. See http://www.w3.org/TR/2010/NOTE-WCAG20-TECHS-20101014/H58 </li></ul>
    • 9. Unusual words (3.1.3) AAA <ul><li>Idioms, metaphors, jargon are defined or explained </li></ul><ul><ul><li>After the word or phrase </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Via a link </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Via a glossary </li></ul></ul>
    • 10. <ul><li>This page from the Westpac bank website (now removed but available on the Internet Archive at http://web.archive.org/web/20060819205904/http://www.westpac.com.au/internet/publish.nsf/Content/PBHLHCEA+Homebuying) using several non-literal phrases, including: </li></ul><ul><li>No small feat </li></ul><ul><li>Inside out </li></ul><ul><li>Forewarned is forearmed </li></ul><ul><li>Through the maze </li></ul><ul><li>Fall into place </li></ul><ul><li>Empty nester </li></ul><ul><li>Sea change </li></ul><ul><li>Value tied up </li></ul><ul><li>Step out on their own </li></ul>
    • 11. <ul><li>The guidelines suggest we can explain these terms by providing a link to a definition or a glossary of definitions. But imagine how the page would look if those phrases were all links to a glossary or definition! And what would a screen reader user make of links like this: </li></ul><ul><li>No small feat </li></ul><ul><li>Inside out </li></ul><ul><li>Forewarned is forearmed </li></ul><ul><li>Through the maze </li></ul><ul><li>Fall into place </li></ul><ul><li>Empty nester </li></ul><ul><li>Sea change </li></ul><ul><li>Value tied up </li></ul><ul><li>Step out on their own </li></ul>
    • 12. <ul><li>The guidelines also say we can explain non-literal language within the existing content. Imagine how the content would be if we tried to define all these all within the text! </li></ul>
    • 13. &nbsp;
    • 14. Abbreviations (3.1.4) AAA <ul><li>Abbreviations, acronyms or initialisms are expanded or explained </li></ul><ul><ul><li>After the word </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Via a link </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Via a glossary </li></ul></ul>
    • 15. <ul><li>Here’s an example of abbreviations on a Queensland government website. In one paragraph, there are 5. </li></ul><ul><li>“ OESR is a member of the Queensland Spatial Information Council. QSIC is supported by OESR through the QSIIS Spatial Information Office (QIO), a business unit of OESR. In striving to achieve the QSIC business priorities, the QSIO facilitates the delivery of integrated solutions in tandem with Government agencies and the private sector. </li></ul>
    • 16. <ul><li>The guidelines say we can expand the first instance of these abbreviations in the text. But this is a messy solution. </li></ul>
    • 17. <ul><li>And linking to a glossary for each expansion would also be messy – not to mention time consuming for a poor user who had to click back and forth to figure out what was being said. </li></ul>
    • 18. <ul><li>So a better solution is to avoid using shortened forms wherever you can. Try using a shorter name instead. For instance, instead of using ‘QSIC’, use ‘Queensland Spatial Information Council’ and then ‘the Council’. </li></ul>
    • 19. Reading level (3.1.5) AAA <ul><li>Content is written at lower secondary level, has supplementary content or an alternative is provided. </li></ul>
    • 20. <ul><li>It isn’t really practical to provide alternative versions of content. Most organisations find it hard to resource their web/intranet teams as it is, without producing extra versions of content. </li></ul><ul><li>Supplementary content can help everyone though. As the saying goes ‘an image is worth a thousand words’. Supplementing text with graphics, diagrams, multimedia and so on – when done to aid understanding – can be beneficial for everyone. </li></ul><ul><li>You can use tools to test the readability level of your content, but they only test based on two things: the length of sentences and the length (in syllables) of words. For more on readability testing, see: </li></ul><ul><li>http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/word-help/test-your-document-s-readability-HP010148506.aspx </li></ul><ul><li>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Readability_test </li></ul>
    • 21. <ul><li>For some discussions of the limitations of readability testing, see: </li></ul><ul><li>Redish, J. C., 2000, Readability formulas have even more limitations than Klare discusses, ACM Journal of Computer Documentation, 24 (3), August, 132-137. </li></ul><ul><li>Redish, J. C. and Selzer, J., 1985, The Place of Readability Formulas in Technical Communication, Technical Communication , 32 (4), November, 46-52. </li></ul><ul><li>For other ways of testing content, see: </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.alistapart.com/articles/testing-content/ </li></ul>
    • 22. Pronunciation (3.1.6) AA <ul><li>A pronunciation is provided for words where the meaning would otherwise be ambiguous </li></ul><ul><ul><li>After the word </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Via a link </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Via a glossary </li></ul></ul>
    • 23. 2. Non-text, visual content <ul><li>7 WCAG 2.0 guidelines relate to non-text and visual aspects of content </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1.1.1 Non-text content </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1.4.1 Use of colour </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1.4.3, 1.4.6 Contrast </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1.4.5, 1.4.9 Images of text </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>3.2.4 Consistent identification </li></ul></ul>
    • 24. Non-text content (1.1.1) A <ul><li>Images have an equivalent text alternative </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Must convey the same information or play the same role as the image </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>3 types of text alternative </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Blank, short, long </li></ul></ul></ul>
    • 25. Blank text alternative <ul><li>Use when images </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Are decorative </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Repeat information already in the text </li></ul></ul><ul><li>&lt;img src=“/images/floral-thumbnail.jpg” alt=“ ” …. / &gt; </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Listen to a video of a screen reader reading descriptions of decorative images – it’s very tedious! </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http:// www.youtube.com/watch?v =IK97XMibEws </li></ul></ul>
    • 26. Short text alternative <ul><li>Use when images </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Convey information not already mentioned in the text </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Are links </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>&lt;img src=”/images/logo.gif” alt=”XYZ Company” … / &gt; </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The important thing to remember is that the text alternative must provide the same content or function as the image. It cannot leave out important details. </li></ul>
    • 27. Long text alternative <ul><li>Use when images need a text alternative that </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Is too long for the ALT text (no technical limit though) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Needs some structure or formatting for it to be meaningful </li></ul></ul><ul><li>2 main ways to do it </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Text on the same page as the image </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Text on a linked page </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Text version of … </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>LONGDESC attribute &lt;img src=“graph.gif” longdesc=“graph.html”&gt; </li></ul></ul></ul>
    • 28. <ul><li>To see an example of a long text alternative used on the same page as the image it replaces, see: </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.4syllables.com.au/2010/12/text-alternatives-decision-tree/ </li></ul>
    • 29. <ul><li>Here’s an example of a long text alternative provided on a linked page: </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.monash.edu.au/about/org-chart.html </li></ul>
    • 30.
    • 31. Use of color (1.4.1) A <ul><li>Colour is not used on its own to show meaning </li></ul><ul><li>Supplement with </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Text labels </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cross-hatching, different line styles in graphics </li></ul></ul>
    • 32. <ul><li>This example shows a social media usage graph. Each social media channel (Facebook, YouTube, Twitter and so on) is shown in a different colour. If the user cannot differentiate the colours, they may not be able to make any sense of the information in the graph. </li></ul><ul><li>You can read an article and see another example here: h ttp://www.4syllables.com.au/2011/04/accessibility-web-writers-part-5/ </li></ul>
    • 33. Contrast (1.4.3, 1.4.6) AA, AAA <ul><li>Text and background colours have a contrast ratio of 4.5:1 or 3:1 for large text </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Applies to text, images of text, text in images </li></ul></ul>
    • 34. &nbsp;
    • 35. Images of text (1.4.5, 1.4.9) AA, AAA <ul><li>Text is not presented as an image (except in logos) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Can’t enlarge without pixelisation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Smaller the text, bigger the problem </li></ul></ul>
    • 36. <ul><li>This example shows some images of small and larger text that would not enlarge well with a screen magnifier. </li></ul>
    • 37. Consistent identification (3.2.4) <ul><li>Things that have the same function are identified in the same way </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Use the same icons across site </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use the same text alt for icons </li></ul></ul>
    • 38. 3. Structure and formatting <ul><li>3 WCAG 2.0 guidelines </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1.3.1 Info and relationships </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2.4.6 Headings and labels </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2.4.10 Section headings </li></ul></ul>
    • 39. Info and relationships (1.3.1) A <ul><li>Headings, lists, emphasised text, tables, quotations, citations, glossaries need to use appropriate markup </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Must be used properly (example headings nested using correct levels) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Should never be used to achieve visual effects </li></ul></ul>
    • 40. <ul><li>This example shows a home page where there are clearly a series of headings visible. However, the underlying markup only reveals a main heading (h1) and a heading level 4 (h4) </li></ul>
    • 41. <ul><li>This example shows a data table with several rows and columns. If the header rows are marked up properly in HTML (using TH tags), screen reader users may find the table difficult to use. </li></ul>
    • 42. <ul><li>Headings and labels describe the topic or purpose of content below </li></ul>Headings and labels (2.4.6) AA
    • 43. <ul><li>The main heading on this page is “Important information” – it doesn’t describe it’s purpose or topic well. </li></ul><ul><li>See: http://www.canberra.edu.au/accessability/important-information </li></ul>
    • 44. <ul><li>The main heading on this page is also “Important information” – again, that does not describe the topic or purpose well. </li></ul><ul><li>See: http://www.perthtourism.com.au/important-information.html </li></ul><ul><li>Compare with this page: http://www.westernaustralia.com/en/Travel_Info/Visitor_Centres/Pages/Experience_Perth_Visitor_Centres.aspx </li></ul>
    • 45. 4. Navigation <ul><li>3 WCAG 2.0 guidelines </li></ul><ul><ul><li>2.4.2 Page titled </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2.4.4, 2.4.9 Link purpose </li></ul></ul>
    • 46. Page titled (2.4.2) A <ul><li>Page title describes the topic or purpose </li></ul>
    • 47. <ul><li>This screen shot is a search results page from Google, showing a series of items labelled ‘What we do’. It is not immediately clear who ‘we’ is referring to. You can repeat this search on Google using the following link: </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.google.com.au/search?q=allintitle%3A+%22What+we+do%22+site%3A.au&amp;hl=en&amp;num=10&amp;lr=&amp;ft=i&amp;cr=&amp;safe=images&amp;tbs = </li></ul>
    • 48. <ul><li>This screen shot is a search results page from Google, showing a series of PDF documents labelled ‘Untitled’. It is not immediately clear what the content is. Do an advanced search on Google for ‘untitled’ and limit it to the title field of a document, and you’ll see similar results. </li></ul>
    • 49. Link purpose (2.4.4, 2.4.9) A, AAA <ul><li>Link purpose can be understood from the link (and context) </li></ul>
    • 50. <ul><li>This is a screenshot of an old page from the City of Melbourne. It is called “Past meetings” and has a list of committees. Each has a link that says “list of meetings”. </li></ul>
    • 51. <ul><li>To a screen reader user, a series of links labelled only “list of meetings” would be very hard to use. </li></ul><ul><li>This image is a screen capture showing the ‘links list’ dialogue box in JAWS. All the links in the list say the same thing: ‘list of meetings’ </li></ul>
    • 52. <ul><li>The current page on the City of Melbourne website has been improved. Now all the committee names are the links. See: http://www.melbourne.vic.gov.au/AboutCouncil/Meetings/Pages/PastMeetings.aspx </li></ul>
    • 53. 5. Content type (technology) <ul><li>WCAG 2.0 is ‘technology neutral’ </li></ul><ul><li>Can use any technology to present content, as long as it is ‘accessibility supported’ </li></ul><ul><ul><li>a) Technology can be made accessible, AND </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>b) Content in the technology is accessible to </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Assistive technologies </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Accessibility features of browsers and plug-ins </li></ul></ul></ul>
    • 54. Technologies commonly used by writers <ul><li>PDF, Word, RTF, PowerPoint </li></ul><ul><li>Cannot be used as the only format unless </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Considered ‘accessibility supported’ technology </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Document meets all the WCAG 2.0 success criteria (not just the 19 presented today) </li></ul></ul>
    • 55. Is PDF ‘accessibility supported’? <ul><li>Not yet (as of June 2011) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>AGIMO waiting for W3C to endorse draft PDF techniques </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>AHRC will review position in 2013 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>If PDF becomes ‘accessibility supported’ </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Must be produced with newer versions of Acrobat Professional </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Must be tagged and then checked for accessibility </li></ul></ul>
    • 56. <ul><li>See the AGIMO position on PDF: http://webguide.gov.au/accessibility-usability/accessibility/pdf-accessibility/ </li></ul>
    • 57. <ul><li>See the Australian Human Rights Commission’s position on PDF: http://www.hreoc.gov.au/disability_rights/standards/www_3/www_3.html </li></ul>
    • 58. <ul><li>WCAG 2.0 PDF techniques (draft) are available at: http://www.w3.org/WAI/GL/WCAG20-TECHS/pdf.html </li></ul>
    • 59. Some final thoughts on WCAG 2.0 <ul><li>Some techniques are ‘bare bones’ </li></ul><ul><ul><li>May not improve content accessibility in any meaningful way </li></ul></ul><ul><li>In any case, real accessibility is </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Not about compliance with guidelines </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>About a good user experience for people with disabilities </li></ul></ul>
    • 60. Want to know more? <ul><li>We are developing a new course: ‘Accessibility for web writers ’ </li></ul><ul><li>Blogging on content accessibility www.4syllables.com.au/articles </li></ul><ul><li>Monthly newsletter www.4syllables.com.au/subscribe/ </li></ul><ul><li>Twitter @writing4web </li></ul>

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