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Creating & executing a social plan
 

Creating & executing a social plan

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  • Using hashtags in Tweets is (usually) a smart and effective way for a company to increase impressions by leveraging a trending conversation. To that end, brands that use twitter often search for trending topics in the news and craft tweets around those topics to maximize message exposure. One of the most important steps in using trending terms, however, is researching the meaning and context of a hashtag.In the wake of the Casey Anthony trial decision in July of 2011, the internet was buzzing with opinions around the not guilty ruling. This was especially true on Twitter, where the hashtag “#notguilty” quickly became a trending topic. Seeing this trending topic lead an intern executing social media for Entemann’s to craft the following Tweet: Who’s #notguilty about eating all the tasty treats they want?!?Obviously, the author had hoped to capitalize on the trending topic without first researching its meaning and gauging the surrounding sentiment. The tweet was later deleted after @Entenmanns followers, and others around the Twitter community, began tweeting their disapproval of the company's insensitive use of the hashtag.
  • So, what happens when a corporation does not have a strategy in place to effectively utilize social media? • They risk wasting a tremendous amount of time and resources.• They put their brand in great jeopardy.• They potentially fall short on many of their corporate marketing goals.If the platforms are free, then where is the cost?As many companies have already discovered, the true cost in social media is in employee time, resources,and management.
  • So, what happens when a corporation does not have a strategy in place to effectively utilize social media? • They risk wasting a tremendous amount of time and resources.• They put their brand in great jeopardy.• They potentially fall short on many of their corporate marketing goals.If the platforms are free, then where is the cost?As many companies have already discovered, the true cost in social media is in employee time, resources,and management.
  • Known for having great customer service via Twelpforce, Best Buy has a social media policy in place that preemptively addresses privacy concerns that could arise using social media. The company does not want information shared that isn’t meant to be public. Common sense? I think so.Tweeters cannot share Best Buy logos and other items related to the company. Does this smack of being too cautious? I guess that depends on the industry you are in. For a big brand like Best Buy, it's understandable.Best Buy wants each employee to differentiate themselves and state their tweets and posts are theirs -- and theirs alone -- and not associated with Best Buy. If an unscrupulous employee crosses a line, Best Buy won't experience such harsh brand backlash
  • Oracle’s approach to social media is a little on the stricter side. Oracle appears to be of the ilk that using social media in the workplace is a hinderance to productivity because it could lead to too much personal use. Understandable? Yes. Too strict? Debatable. While it can be good to blur the line between personal and professional in social media, that balancing act isn't always appropriate in regulated industries.Employees must establish that all opinions are their own and not Oracle’s, but at the same time, distinguish that they are indeed employees of Oracle. Contradictory? No. Blog posts can increase brand exposure, but employees must be careful with what they say and how they say it, not divulging new features, products, and confidential information is key.
  • For a consumer brand like Coca Cola that gets over 5,000 conversations a day, the pressure is high to keep it fresh and “happy” for their fans and followers online. If you are a consumer brand with a potential to get a high volume of interaction online, you can imagine the army of social media brand evangelists you need to have to respond in real time. What we can learn from Coca Cola is the investment they have made in the CONTINUOUS LEARNING and TRAINING that’s required to build a cross-functional team of employees who understand different channels.  All Coca Cola Associates who wish to officially represent the company online must complete the Social Media Certification Program prior to beginning or continuing these activities. 
  • Ford’s social media policy succeeds in being subtle, “human,” and sensible. Ford adheres to the philosophy that social media interaction follows the same rules as any other interaction, just on a new playground. This type of policy works for companies that have nailed their company culture and established great trust among employees. Their policy boils down to:Use your common sense.Beware of privacy issues.Play nice, and be honest.As long as your employees understand what common sense is and how to use it, this policy is A-okay.Read more: http://blog.hubspot.com/blog/tabid/6307/bid/29441/5-Noteworthy-Examples-of-Corporate-Social-Media-Policies.aspx#ixzz1mHJ3S3YM
  • IBM's social media policy provides a nice balance of rules that help employees that work better with some guidelines and freedom about what can be discussed. Here's how IBM strikes that balance.Clear cut guidelines regarding what cannot be shared and how the company communicates.However, IBM also encourages “IBMers” to express themselves, let their voice shine, and demonstrate their skills and creativity on social media.Employees are encouraged to inspire discourse and share ideas via blogging and social media.Social media policies are important in order to avoid the “lack of common sense” mistakes. However, the degree of leniency is up to you and your management team to decide based on the structure of your company. Pick and choose what works best for your brand and company culture. Consider that, in an age where social media is playing a notable part in many companies' inbound marketing strategies, does it really make sense to completely stifle your employees' freedom and ability to share your content and spread your messages?Does your company have a social media policy in place? How strict or lenient is it? Do you think it is serving your company well, or do changes need to be made?
  • Walmart is dedicated to Twitter and believes in it as an avenue for customer service. Because of this dedication, there is one slightly surprising aspect of the Walmart social media policy.Walmart wants to make sure its employees who are “official” Twitter users for Walmart are identified as such, stick to customer replies, and focus on this alone. Walmart's Twitter users should only talk about Walmart and not engage in unnecessary banter.Too strict? Well, Twitter is a great way to humanize your brand and put a real face behind your company's social media presence. And people don't just talk business all the time, right? However, if they are providing excellent customer service and it is helping them advance their business objectives, can you really blame them?Read more: http://blog.hubspot.com/blog/tabid/6307/bid/29441/5-Noteworthy-Examples-of-Corporate-Social-Media-Policies.aspx#ixzz1mHJ1F9cA
  • Intro to 451 Marketing
  • Intro to 451 Marketing