Building Our Practice: Integrating Instruction and Student Services

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Consider first year experience as a framework for successful collaboration between instruction and support services;
learn about Pasadena City College's Pathways Program and Fullerton College's Entering Scholars Program, two first year experience programs designed to integrate instruction and support services;
Discuss literature relevant to integrating instruction and support services; and
Engage in guided inquiry to explore ways of building professional practice around the integration of instruction and support services on your own campus

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  • Able to get faculty from across the disciplines to teach College 1 by noticing who showed up to our PL events the pilot year before the course was created and doing targeted invites. 
  • Dan, Annie and Dani address program development process
  • Dan and Annie address challenges
  • Annie, Bridget, and Jeanne (just a bit) will talk here about how their curriculum has been transformed by integrating these program elements into the course. Annie and Bridget can split discussing the curriculum integration items, and then maybe each of us can discuss an example related to the collaboration element: maybe Bridget can explain how she integrates a tutor, I can talk about the counseling piece, and Annie can discuss how she worked her SSP into the course.
  • Anything else you would add, Bridget and Annie?
  • Laurie can briefly explain these elements and how they work. Toni can address philosophy of this component and recruitment process.
  • Dani, Jeanne and Toni can address this
  • Amy and Elle on this one
  • Elle and Amy
  • Dan and Bridget
  • Dan and Bridget
  • Building Our Practice: Integrating Instruction and Student Services

    1. 1. Building Our Practice: Integrating Instruction and Student Services Fullerton College October 24, 2013
    2. 2. 3CSN's Mission Develop leaders in California community colleges who have the capacity to facilitate networks of faculty, staff, and students for curricular and institutional redesigns in support of increased student access, success, equity, and completion.
    3. 3. If 3CSN provides training on networking and using action research methodologies, teachers will transform their environments and identity to create communities of practice that will lead to powerful classrooms across campus, which in turn will produce greater student success.
    4. 4. Workshop Outcomes • Participants will • examine literature relevant to integrating instruction and support services; • learn about integration models currently in place at two California Community Colleges; • engage in guided inquiry to explore ways of building professional practice around the integration of instruction and support services.
    5. 5. Key Terms • Support Services • Academic (Instructional) Support Services • Tutoring & Supplemental Instruction, Library • Non Academic Support Services • Financial Aid, Admissions and Records, Counseling, Student Affairs • Support for Non Cognitive/Affective Domain • Attention to selfefficacy, resilience, persistence, organizational and time management skills
    6. 6. Why Integrate Instruction and Support Services? Some answers from the Student Success Task Force Recommendations: 2.4 Support resources for students lacking college readiness 3.4 Begin addressing Basic Skills deficiencies in first year 4.1 Base course offerings & schedules on student needs
    7. 7. An Answer from E-Resource “The work to support our students includes all faculty and staff. Instruction and student services silos are still the common campus model. yet the barriers created by this model reduce student success. These last challenges are ones that do not require funding to solve. Instead, we need to continue educating our college leadership on their responsibility to embrace institutional change.” Illowsky, Barbara. Basic Skills Completion e-Resource. 2013. Page 20
    8. 8. Reading Together Read your assigned section from Integrating Student Supports and Academics: #1 Overview, pages 1-3 #2 Strategies, pages 4-6 #3 Implementation, pages 8-10
    9. 9. Reading Together Read your assigned section of text and note: • connections between ideas in text and discussion of „why‟ integrate instruction and support services • connections to any existing efforts on your campus to integrate instruction and support services • questions and concerns.
    10. 10. Reading Together At your table, • Share key ideas from your section. • Determine one or two „big‟ ideas to share with others who have not yet read this section. •which ideas are most significant for others to consider?
    11. 11. Reading Together In a group with people from other tables, • Be sure your new group has a representative for each of the three sections. • Share „big‟ ideas with new group mates. • Discuss any new „aha‟ moments or questions. • Record one or two key ideas and/or questions on a poster.
    12. 12. Challenges to Integration Discussion What are some of the challenges or obstacles that can make integration and collaboration between Instruction and Student Services difficult?
    13. 13. Program Presentations As you listen to the presentations, make note of the following: 1) What particular collaborations have been required to develop, grow, maintain and improve the programs? 2) What challenges have the programs faced, and how have they overcome those challenges? 3) What questions do you have for the presenters? (Questions will be addressed at the end of each presentation)
    14. 14. Overview •Started in 2011 •Summer Jams Orientation •Full course load (English, Math, Freshman Seminar, GE/major) •One Book, One College (The Pact, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, Southland) •Student Conference •First Year Counselors & Coaches •Student homework and tutoring lab
    15. 15. Program Outcomes XL Pathway Outcomes • Actively engage with instructors, classmates, counselors, coaches and tutors • Use success strategies including critical reading, information literacy and study skills • Successfully complete at least 20 units of coursework, including English and math, within the first year at PCC • Persist to fall of the second year of college
    16. 16. We Started Jamming •XL Pathway •Info session •Math Jam Summer Jams •International Students Pathway •Welcome Day •Check-In Day •iJam
    17. 17. TLC •Coaching Teaching & Learning Center •Identify and pursue personal and educational goals •Identify obstacles to academic success and use appropriate support services and resources to overcome them •Tutoring •Study Space •Develop and implement new strategies that address the diverse issues that affect the success of our students •Evaluate these strategies and scale up to those that are shown to be effective
    18. 18. •Counseling Counseling •Involved in Math Jam Coaches •Designated Pathways appointments •Registration Workshops •Work closely with coaching staff
    19. 19. Pilot Imperfectly: Live the Nightmare •“FYE Seminar” •300 students •3 back-to-back classes •Every Friday •Professional Learning Workshops
    20. 20. Scale Up Numbers: •2011: 300 students •2012: 800 + 150 International •2013: 1200 + 300 International Freshman Seminar Created (College 1) •3 units, transferrable to UC/CSU •Info Literacy, Critical Reading Skills, College Success Behaviors •Interdisciplinary faculty 38 sections of College 1
    21. 21. We built it… and they came •32 instructors from all 12 divisions on campus •One week professional learning institute Student •Extensive shared reading Services & Instruction •One Book, One College as course text •Additional non-fiction text (Mindset by Carol Dweck/Switch by Chip and Dan Heath) •Text sets (videos, college websites/magazines, articles: newspaper and peer-reviewed)
    22. 22. The Spread  New Faculty  Departments  Program Redesign  Curious managers  Committees  Willing staff  Clubs  Disenfranchised Faculty College 1
    23. 23. Summer Jams Counseling Student Services & Instruction College 1 Coaches Teaching & Learning Center
    24. 24. Questions????? Presenters: •Myriam Altounji, Counselor •Lindsey Pilgreen, ESL Instructor •Lily Tran, Coach
    25. 25. Fullerton College Entering Scholars Program Our Why “Fostering student success in the freshman year is the most significant intervention an institution can make it the name of student persistence. . .The freshman‟s most critical transition period occurs during the first two to six weeks (half the students who dropped out their first year, dropped out in the first six weeks)” (Levitz and Noel). “The academic literature is clear: the early weeks on campus truly matter for students and affect their likelihood of progressing” (Tinto). Stated most simply, new students need to feel a part of their new institution and need to connect to each other, to faculty, and to the campus community.
    26. 26. Fullerton College Entering Scholars Program Vision To help first year students persist and succeed by embedding support in the reading or English classroom with the goals of: • Increasing student familiarity with and access to academic support services on campus • Improving student study skills • Supporting students in making educational plans • Helping students make meaningful connections with campus faculty, staff, and peers • Increasing student engagement in campus life
    27. 27. Fullerton College Entering Scholars Program Faculty Members Student Tutors Student Support Professionals (SSPs) Counselors • Dedicated faculty members attend monthly ESP meetings and training sessions • Student tutors are assigned to each class in order to provide support inside and outside of class • Classified staff members attend class weekly, make announcements, and provide non-academic support • Dedicated ESP counselors make classroom visits and tailor information about educational planning Campus Resources • Faculty introduce ESP students to the various support services available on campus Success Strategies • Study skills and information literacy activities are infused into the existing curriculum
    28. 28. Fullerton College Entering Scholars Program Program Development Process •Planning Committee/Basic Skills Committee •FYE Conference Attendance •Program materials •Course pack •Library activity •Scavenger hunt •Pilot •Trainings/Check-in Meetings •Handbook •Assessment
    29. 29. Fullerton College Entering Scholars Program Challenges and Revisions: Planning •Math •Linked classes •Counseling participation in planning •“Counseling Connections” fold-in
    30. 30. Fullerton College Entering Scholars Program Faculty Role •Curriculum Integration •Study skills instruction •Support services •Personal/career exploration •Library/information literacy activity •Collaboration/Integration •Tutors •Counselors •SSPs
    31. 31. Fullerton College Entering Scholars Program Challenges and Revisions: Faculty •Difficult to incorporate all elements of program •Menu approach •Course pack as recommended resource not requirement •Library activity originally focused on research •Customized by level
    32. 32. Fullerton College Entering Scholars Program Student Support Professional (SSP) Role •A friendly Student Services representative establishes a personal connection with students •Weekly classroom visits •Scavenger hunt stop •Email communication •Personal office visits •That person serves as an important source of regular information about support services and campus events/activities •Weekly announcements •General Student Services presentation •Special area/office-related presentation
    33. 33. Fullerton College Entering Scholars Program Challenges and Revisions: SSP •Recruitment •Switch from hour to 20 minutes per week •Clarity about role in the classroom •Weekly announcements
    34. 34. Fullerton College Entering Scholars Program Tutor Role •In class •Interact during group activities •Take class notes •Participate in discussions •Out of class •One-on-one tutoring •Group sessions •Email support
    35. 35. Fullerton College Entering Scholars Program Challenges and Revisions: Tutor •Limited class time •Switched from 2 hours per week to 4 in class •Motivating students to use out-of-class tutoring •Shared ideas and best practices during check-in meetings
    36. 36. Fullerton College Entering Scholars Program Counselor Role •Classroom Presentation •General education information •Information about counselor visits •Ed planning •Follow-up visit
    37. 37. Fullerton College Entering Scholars Program Challenges and Revisions: Counseling •Lack of consistency in presentation content •Work with Counseling chair to develop guidelines for presentations •Eventually established dedicated program counselors •Presentations not always level-appropriate •Counselors collaborate with faculty to customize presentations for each level and course •Counseling unable to accommodate required follow-up visits for all ESP students •Follow-up visits recommended not required •Faculty design alternate follow-up assignments
    38. 38. Fullerton College Entering Scholars Program Faculty Member Success Strategies Student Tutor Increased Student success, rete ntion and persistence Campus Resources Counselor Student Support Professional (SSP)
    39. 39. Fullerton College Entering Scholars Program Scaling Up Participation 600 494 500 513 540 430 400 300 200 100 Number of Students 166 157 0 Fall Spring Fall Spring Fall Spring 2010 2011 2011 2012 2012 2013
    40. 40. Fullerton College Entering Scholars Program ESP Success Rates Success, ESP and Comparison Courses, Fall 2012 Not Successful N % Comparison ESP 462 103 29% 19% Successful N % 1139 433 71% 81% Total N % 1601 536 100% 100% Success for First-Time Students, ESP and Comparison Courses, Fall 2012 Not Successful N % Comparison ESP 124 70 29% 16% Successful N % 304 355 71% 84% Total N % 428 425 100% 100%
    41. 41. Fullerton College Entering Scholars Program ESP Retention Rates Retention, ESP and Comparison Courses, Fall 2012 Not Retained N % Comparison ESP 200 41 12% 8% Retained N % 1401 495 88% 92% Total N % 1601 536 100% 100% Retention for First-Time Students, ESP and Comparison Courses, Fall 2012 Not Retained N % Comparison ESP 44 24 10% 6% Retained N % 384 401 90% 94% Total N % 428 425 100% 100%
    42. 42. Fullerton College Entering Scholars Program Questions???? Presenters: • • • • • • • • • --Jeanne Costello, English Instructor --Toni DuBois, VP of Student Services --Bridget Kominek, English Instructor --Annie Liu, English Instructor --Amy Mills, former ESP Tutor --Elle Mooney, current ESP Tutor --Laurie Triefenbach, SSP --Dan Willoughby, Dean of Humanities --Dani Wilson, Basic Skills Director
    43. 43. Review Principles Discussion Based on what we‟ve learned from the reading activity, presentations, and your own experience, what seem to be the principles for effectively integrating instruction and student services?
    44. 44. Appreciative Inquiry
    45. 45. Application Activity Relationships: Who are people in instruction and student services who are already or might be effective collaborators in efforts to support students? Possibilities: What is one collaborative effort you have begun or might imagine beginning with those people on your team? Plan: What is something you would have to do to strengthen an existing effort or begin making such a collaborative effort possible?
    46. 46. Share Out What is your most useful takeaway from this event?
    47. 47. Resources and Credits Basic Skills Completion Chancellor's Office Basic Skills E-Resource The Game Changers Series, WestEd Integrating Student Supports and Academics
    48. 48. Evaluations We value your feedback and use it to guide our planning of future events. You may leave completed evaluations on your table.
    49. 49. Thank You So glad you could join us! Please stay for the social hour and continue the conversation!

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