Promises To Frame Scrum
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Promises To Frame Scrum

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This is a tool to help practioners implmenting scrum. It is a short discussion and exercise around a short hand way of framing scrum with promises. It is intended for experienced facilitators. ...

This is a tool to help practioners implmenting scrum. It is a short discussion and exercise around a short hand way of framing scrum with promises. It is intended for experienced facilitators. http://advancedtopicsinscrum.com

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Promises To Frame Scrum Promises To Frame Scrum Presentation Transcript

  • Promises to Frame Scrum [email_address] www.3back.com We make teams better.
  • 30-40 min Discussion
    • PURPOSE: This is a 30-40 minute discussion that should be run an experienced facilitator to help a team of people understand what it takes to implement scrum.
      • Present the slides with light Q&A
      • Pause more on the promises
      • Then initiate small group digest.
      • * Assumes basic knowledge of the Scrum Framework, professional work history and small team experience. Don’t do this without those knowledge areas being filled. If you do it will only create more confusion and probably stymie your team’s ability to learn.
    • Recommend as an accelerated learning cycle (ALC) for leadership that does not have time for a fuller introduction to Scrum but, must consider what they are getting into. This will help frame the context for managing complex conceptually driven initiatives.
  • Scrum
    • Scrum is…
    • A simple framework that can be understood and implemented in a few days
    • An approach to managing complexity
    • A collaborative effort that enables an engaged ongoing dialog
    • A work management wrapper around existing practices
    • An enabler of informed strategic decision by providing line of sight to ground floor realities
    • Scrum is not a methodology – it is a pathway
    • to Well Formed Teams
    View slide
  • Scrum Terms
    • 3 Roles:
      • ScrumMaster
      • Team
      • Product Owner
    • 3 Artifacts:
      • Product Backlog (PBL)
      • Sprint Backlog (SBL)
      • Burndown
    • 3 Meetings:
      • Sprint Planning
      • Daily Standup
      • Sprint Review
    • Other Terms:
      • Sprint
      • Prioritization
    View slide
  • Scrum Roles Scrum Master Product Owner
    • Defines the features of the product, decides on release date and content
    • Is responsible for the profitability of the product (ROI)
    • Prioritizes features according to market value
    • Can change features and priority every 30 days
    • Accepts or rejects work results
    • Cross-functional, seven plus/minus two members
    • Selects the iteration goal and specifies work results
    • Has the right to do everything within the boundaries of the project guidelines to reach the iteration goal
    • Organizes itself and its work
    • Demos work results to the Product Owner
    • Ensures that the team is fully functional and productive
    • Enables close cooperation across all roles and functions and removes barriers
    • Shields the team from external interferences
    • Ensures that the process is followed. Invites to daily scrum, iteration review and planning meetings
    Team The ScrumTeam
  • The Basic Scrum Engine
    • Walls of the “Container”:
    • Time-boxing
    • Impediment Resolution
    • Cross-functionality
    • Self-Organization
    • Protection from “wolves”
    • Clear Acceptance Criteria
    Business Owner Scrum Master Product Owner Cross-Functional Team Product Backlog Product
  • Flow Through 1 Sprint Sprint Planning Sprint Review / Retrospective Daily Scrum Sprint Meaningful Product Increment Product Sprint Backlog Inspect Adapt
    • Reports
    • The Work
    • Metrics
    • Impediments
    Product Backlog "The Business" Product Owner Scrum Master Cross-Functional Team
  • Scrum is a Framework
    • Scrum’s Big Rule
    • The team will own and adapt its processes to realities they encounter and improve their abilities to deliver quality product.
    • Scrum is a descriptive process and has prescriptive elements
      • Descriptive : what we can expect when the process is in motion
      • Prescriptive : telling us how to get started
    This is very subtle and forms a trap!
  • Self Organizing ScrumTeam
    • Individuals on a ScrumTeam focus on
      • building working product
      • more than on their specialty
    • The individuals on a team self-organize for the task at hand - transparency
    • The smallest group of people that can build a meaningful increment of product is the Teamlet
      • The Teamlet has all the skills it needs (analysis, development, design, test, documentation, …)
      • It typically consists of 2-4 people to get all the skills “covered”
      • It swarms on one thing at a time
  • Organization, Stakeholders and Scrum Team All of the Stakeholders Visually it’s a mess and very fluid! Org. Key Stakeholders Scrum Team Business Owner
  • Implementing Scrum
    • Scrum Requires that a ScrumTeam be set up.
    • The Organization and ScrumTeam must make some promises to each other
    • Members of the ScrumTeam must make some promises to each other
    • We will consider two sets of promises as contracts
    The ScrumTeam promises the Stakeholders that there is a ProductOwner on the ScrumTeam driving the ScrumTeam based on Stakeholders interests. The Organization promises the ScrumTeam that there are Stakeholders (including Subject Matter Experts) who will help when needed. The ScrumTeam promises to use the Stakeholders’ time wisely, by focusing on questions that are relevant to the work being done now. The Organization promises that they will help the ScrumMaster in the removal of impediments to the ScrumTeam’s progress The ScrumTeam promises that they will do quality work the best way they know how within the constraints set forth by the organization. The Organization promises the ScrumTeam that they will not change priorities or constraints in the middle of a sprint without ScrumTeam’s consent. The ScrumTeam promises to deliver demonstrable product at the end of every sprint for review and validation by the Stakeholders. The Organization promises that being on a ScrumTeam will not hurt the members’ careers. The ProductOwner promises the Team to he/she will supply an initial Product Backlog. The ProductOwner promises the Team that he/she will prioritize the Product Backlog when needed. The ScrumMaster promises to keep the Team healthy by focusing on the removal of impediments, both internal and external. The ProductOwner promises that an empowered “voice of the customer” will be provided to answer business domain questions promptly (minutes / hours, not days). The ScrumTeam promises that its work will be transparent, that it will make decisions and solve problems as a group, and that no individual Team member will be left behind. Each member of the ScrumTeam promises that they will bring issues, problems, impediments and realities encountered to the ScrumTeam Contract 1 Contract 2
  • Contract Between The Organization And The ScrumTeam
    • The ScrumTeam promises the Stakeholders that there is a ProductOwner on the ScrumTeam driving the ScrumTeam based on Stakeholders interests.
    • The Organization promises the ScrumTeam that there are Stakeholders (including Subject Matter Experts) who will help when needed.
    • The ScrumTeam promises to use the Stakeholders’ time wisely, by focusing on questions that are relevant to the work being done now.
    • The Organization promises that they will help the ScrumMaster in the removal of impediments to the ScrumTeam’s progress
  • (Continued) Organization and The ScrumTeam
    • The ScrumTeam promises that they will do quality work the best way they know how within the constraints set forth by the organization.
    • The Organization promises the ScrumTeam that they will not change priorities or constraints in the middle of a sprint without ScrumTeam’s consent.
    • The ScrumTeam promises to deliver demonstrable product at the end of every sprint for review and validation by the Stakeholders.
    • The Organization promises that being on a ScrumTeam will not hurt the members’ careers.
  • Contract Between Members of the ScrumTeam
    • The ProductOwner promises the Team to supply an initial Product Backlog.
    • The ProductOwner promises the Team to prioritize the Product Backlog when needed.
    • The ScrumMaster promises to keep the Team healthy by focusing on the removal of impediments, both internal and external.
  • (Continued) Members of the ScrumTeam
    • The ProductOwner promises that an empowered “voice of the customer” will be provided to answer business domain questions promptly (minutes / hours, not days).
    • The ScrumTeam promises to make decisions and solve problems as a group, make its work transparent, and leave no Team member behind.
    • Each member of the ScrumTeam promises that they will bring issues, problems, impediments and realities encountered to the ScrumTeam
  • When Promises Are Broken
    • Common Causes of Failure
    • Lack of an empowered, rapidly-responding ProductOwner
    • Unstable priorities and focus within a sprint
    • Prescriptive direction of the team
    • Lack of Retrospection
    • Failure to build and leverage LocalKnowledge
    … and many more
  • Impact of Broken Promises
    • A promise broken is a organizational/process issue, not a team issue
    • For example, we don’t blame a Product Owner for not being able to make decisions
      • We blame the business for not empowering the Product Owner to make decisions
      • We blame the business for not allowing the Product Owner to learn enough about the business
      • Possible Solution: The team calls “time out” and does other stuff while the Product Owner goes off and gets up to speed
  • Lets Setup Some Work Groups
    • Arrange the Room as needed
    • Break into Groups of 4-7
  • Team Dialog and Group Dialog: Promises for Scrum
    • Turn to people in your group and share short answers to the following for 5 minutes:
    • Do you agree with the common causes of failure listed?
    • Are there any others?
    • Should we call these a contract or covenant? Or just an agreement? Does it matter?
    • Do we need periodic review of our Scrum implementation?
  • Letting Go And Transition
    • What will it take to implement Scrum?
    • Will you do it a revolutionary way?
      • Knock everything down and start over?
    • Will you take a softer evolutionary path?
      • Work it in slowly, learn and grow but, don’t change things that are not broke?
    • The above questions are simply a way of looking at your implementation. They are not answers in and of themselves.
    • In either case you will have a sense of letting go so that you can transition. What will you be letting go?
  • Advanced Topics in Scrum
    • This Slide Series is part of an upcoming book.
      • By Doug Shimp and Dan Rawsthorne
    • You Can:
    • Join, Share, Contribute and Be Recognized
    • Our Personal Websites
    • Dan Rawsthorne
    • Doug Shimp
    http://advancedtopicsinscrum.com http://danube.com/dan_rawsthorne.htm http://doug-shimp.net
    • Starting at Scale: Transitioning to Agile Product Development for Large Groups
    • Adaptive Strategic Planning And Management
    • Scrum Team Training
    • ScrumMaster Training
    • Agile Requirements Training
    • Many of our engagements are “customized efforts” which requires an agile dialog to craft 
    • Upcoming Public Events: http://www.3back.com/events
    • Contact us: [email_address]
    Thank You! The arena of product development presents a great place for organizations to develop talented, thinking, and enthusiastic people. When these same people are encouraged to join a team with open and honest dialog, then organizations see an explosion of innovative talent. Our goal is to help organizations develop those people into "well formed teams" that become innovation engines of extraordinary value. Our Services: We make teams better.
  • Thank you What did we learn?