Making Lecture Capture Accessible and Captioning Technology for Interactive & Searchable Access
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Making Lecture Capture Accessible and Captioning Technology for Interactive & Searchable Access

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ATIA 2013, January 30, 2013 ...

ATIA 2013, January 30, 2013

Accessibility Data:

- More than 1 billion people have a disability
- 56.7 million report a disability in the U.S.
- 48 million (20%) in the U.S. have some hearing loss
- 11% of postsecondary students report having a disability
- 45% of 1.6 million veterans seek disability
- 177,000+ veterans claimed hearing loss

Captions are text that is time-sychronized with the media. They convey all spoken content as well as relevant sound effects. Captions originated in the early 1980s from an FCC mandate for broadcast TV.

The 21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act requires all Internet programming that previously aired on television with captions to have captions online, as well.

The values of captioning include:
- Accessibility for deaf and hard of hearing
- Accessibility for ESL viewers
- Flexibility to view anywhere, such as noisy environments or offices
- Search
- Reusability
- Navigation, better UX
- SEO/discoverability
- Used as source for translation

View the slideshow for a how-to on adding captions to your lectures and videos with 3Play Media.

Presenters:

Tole Khesin | VP of Marketing, 3Play Media

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Making Lecture Capture Accessible and Captioning Technology for Interactive & Searchable Access Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Making Lecture Capture Accessible and Captioning Technology for Interactive & Searchable Access ATIA 2013, January 30, 2013 Tole Khesin tole@3playmedia.com
  • 2. Agenda Captioning basics Process Accessibility legislation Value propositions Beyond captions Demos Open discussion
  • 3. What Are Captions? • Captions are text that is time-synchronized with the media • Captions convey all spoken content as well as relevant sound effects • Originated in the early 1980s from an FCC mandate for broadcast TV
  • 4. What Are Captions? Terminology • Captioning vs. Transcription
  • 5. What Are Captions? Terminology • Captioning vs. Transcription • Captioning vs. Subtitling
  • 6. What Are Captions? Terminology • Captioning vs. Transcription • Captioning vs. Subtitling • Closed Captioning vs. Open Captioning
  • 7. What Are Captions? Terminology • Captioning vs. Transcription • Captioning vs. Subtitling • Closed Captioning vs. Open Captioning • Post Production vs. Real-Time
  • 8. How Are Captions Used?
  • 9. Accessibility Laws Section 508 “All training and informational video and multimedia productions must contain captions …” Section 504 “No individual, solely by reason of her or his disability…be denied the benefits of any program, service, or activity…”
  • 10. Accessibility Laws Section 508 “All training and informational video and multimedia productions must contain captions …” Section 504 “No individual, solely by reason of her or his disability…be denied the benefits of any program, service, or activity…” 21st Century Communications & Video Accessibility Act (CVAA) “Closed captioning on video programming delivered using internet protocol….”
  • 11. Accessibility Laws CVAA Phase-In Timeline Phased In: All prerecorded programming that is not edited for Internet distribution Mar 30, 2013: Live & near-live programming originally broadcast on television. Sep 30, 2013 : Prerecorded programming that is edited for Internet distribution. Mar 30, 2014: Archival programming
  • 12. Value Propositions • Accessible for deaf and hard of hearing • For ESL viewers • Flexibility to view anywhere, such as noisy environments or offices • Search • Reusability • Navigation, better UX • SEO/discoverability • Used as source for translation
  • 13. Captioning Process 1. Upload 2. Download 3. Publish
  • 14. Step 1. Upload Media Files
  • 15. Step 2. Download Captions File
  • 16. Step 3. Publish Captions
  • 17. Captions Formats Common Caption Formats SRT YouTube and other web players DFXP Flash players SCC iPods, iTunes, DVD encoding SAMI Windows Media QT QuickTime STL DVD Studio Pro CPT.XML Captionate SBV YouTube RT Real Media WebVTT Emerging HTML5 Custom XML Custom formats Custom Text Custom formats Emerging standards for HTML5 SRT Example
  • 18. Simplifying the Workflow Video Player / Platform Integrations
  • 19. Captions Plugin • Works with most video players • SEO boost • Searchable • Free • Supports multiple languages • Customizable
  • 20. Beyond Captions
  • 21. Demos • Implementations of captions + transcripts • Examples of automated captioning workflows • Searchable, interactive video libraries
  • 22. Results @ MIT OpenCourseWare 97% of students said interactive transcripts enhanced their learning experience
  • 23. Results @ MIT OpenCourseWare 95% of Students were able to find desired content using the search features
  • 24. Results @ MIT OpenCourseWare Usefulness of interactive transcript features
  • 25. Results @ MIT OpenCourseWare 97% of students said the interactive transcripts were easy to use
  • 26. Results @ MIT OpenCourseWare 95% of students recommended that interactive transcripts be added to all OCW videos
  • 27. Questions Tole Khesin 3Play Media tole@3playmedia.com Tel (415) 298-1206 Resources http://www.3playmedia.com/how-itworks/overview/