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3M™ Tegaderm™ Dressings IV Site Care
 

3M™ Tegaderm™ Dressings IV Site Care

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Get back to the basics with this IV Site Care presentation from 3M™ Tegaderm™ Dressings. Complete with examples, recommendations and best practises, learn more from 3M Skin & Wound Care at ...

Get back to the basics with this IV Site Care presentation from 3M™ Tegaderm™ Dressings. Complete with examples, recommendations and best practises, learn more from 3M Skin & Wound Care at http://go.3M.com/Tegaderm4Dressings

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    3M™ Tegaderm™ Dressings IV Site Care 3M™ Tegaderm™ Dressings IV Site Care Presentation Transcript

    • Back to Basics: IV Site Care Sponsored by 3M™ Tegaderm™ Transparent Film Dressings © 3M 2007. All Rights Reserved.
    • Today’s Topics 1 OVERVIEW 2 DRESSING CHOICES 3 GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS 4 HOW TO APPLY & REMOVE DRESSINGS
    • Today’s Topics 5 TIPS FOR SOLVING PROBLEMS 6 CATHETER SECUREMENT METHODS 7 SITE ASSESSMENT & COMLICATIONS 8 DOCUMENTATION
    • Vascular Access Devices 200 200 Million Vascular Access Devices Sold in the U.S. 100 Millions Frost and Sullivan, 2005
    • Why be Concerned? • Loss of an IV can cause: – Delays in therapy – Increased hospital stays • Complications can: – Increase morbidity and mortality – Delay discharge – Increase health care costs
    • Two Primary Goals of Infusion Therapy Improve patient outcomes Prevent complications
    • Clinician Responsibility Choosing Providing Aspects Monitoring of Infusion Assessing Therapy Documenting Do no harm
    • Today’s Topics OVERVIEW 1 2 DRESSING CHOICES 3 GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS 4 HOW TO APPLY & REMOVE DRESSINGS
    • Types of Catheter Dressings Transparent 2 1 Tape and Gauze
    • Tape and Gauze Dressings • Positive Features Absorbency Minimizes exposure to adhesive  Limitations • Poor adhesion • Poor barrier to bacteria • No barrier to fluids • Must be removed to assess the site and changed every 48 hours (CDC & INS) • Bulky and uncomfortable for patients • Provide little stability for catheter securement
    • Types of Catheter Dressings Transparent 2 Tape and Gauze
    • Transparent Dressings  Transparent Semi- Transparent permeable Membrane (TSM) 2  Transparent Adhesive Dressings (TAD)  Transparent Film Dressings
    • Transparent Dressings  Positive Features • Breathable • Semi-permeable barrier to external contaminants • May also provide a barrier to bacteria and viruses • Help secure and stabilize the catheter  Limitations Not absorbent May not be appropriate for sites with: Excessive bleeding Skin previously compromised
    • Transparent Dressings • Transparent film dressings: – Use pressure sensitive adhesives (PSA) • PSAs are soft, allowing them to: • Conform to the irregular surface of the skin • Stick well to the contours of the body.
    • Today’s Topics 1OVERVIEW 2DRESSING CHOICES 3 GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS 4 HOW TO APPLY & REMOVE DRESSINGS
    • Guidelines for PIV Dressings According to CDC guidelines and CDC INS Standards of Practice, how frequently should a transparent adhesive dressing applied to a peripheral IV be changed? INS A. Every 2 hours B. Every 10 days C. Every 72-96 hrs or w/site rotation D. Once per month
    • Guidelines for CVC Dressings According to CDC guidelines and CDC INS Standards of Practice, when should CVC dressings be changed? A. Every 48 hours for gauze, tape and gauze, or island dressings INS B. When the dressing is compromised in any way C. Every 7 days for transparent dressings D. With site rotation
    • Today’s Topics 1OVERVIEW 2DRESSING CHOICE 3GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS 4 HOW TO APPLY & REMOVE DRESSINGS
    • Applying Dressings Three main steps 1. Remove the back liner 2. Press the dressing onto the site 3. Remove the frame as you smooth the edges Remember to • Use firm pressure • Make sure extensions & IV tubing are secured
    • Application Tips for Transparent Adhesive Dressings APPLICATION TIP True or False? 1. Make sure the skin is free of soaps, detergents, and lotions. TRUE 2. Very gently press the dressing into place. FALSE
    • Application Tips for Transparent Adhesive Dressings APPLICATION TIP True or False? 3. STRETCH the tape or dressing during application. FALSE 4. Place a small strip of sterile tape over the hub without obscuring the site for added catheter TRUE stability.
    • Removing Dressings
    • Dressing Removal Techniques Low and Slow Stretch Release
    • Today’s Topics 5 TIPS FOR SOLVING PROBLEMS 6 CATHETER SECUREMENT METHODS 7 SITE ASSESSMENT & COMPLICATIONS 8 DOCUMENTATION
    • Tips for Solving Problems MOST COMMON CAUSES of ADHESION PROBLEMS 1 Failure to apply the dressing with pressure to the edges Failure to allow prepping 2 agents to dry thoroughly
    • Failure to Apply Pressure Review:  Application Can cause:  Lifting  Rolling  Falling off Rolling – Edge Lift
    • Failure to Allow Preps to Dry Review:  Skin Preparation  Make sure the skin is clean and dry  Allow preps to dry thoroughly  Clip (don’t shave) body hair as needed
    • Skin Injuries
    • Skin Injuries: Skin Stripping Skin Stripping appears: – As a reddened area…or… – As shiny skin Occurs more often: • In patients with fragile skin • Where an aggressive adhesive was used
    • Preventing Skin Stripping Use an alcohol-free film type skin protectant
    • S.P.A.R.E. • Select the right product • Prepare the skin and position the body • Apply using appropriate technique • Remove using appropriate technique • Evaluate skin site, Eliminate causative factors, Educate others, Elect to report skin problems to manufacturer
    • Today’s Topics TIPS FOR SOLVING PROBLEMS 5 6 CATHETER SECUREMENT METHODS 7 SITE ASSESSMENT & COMPLICATIONS 8 DOCUMENTATION
    • Why Attend to Securement? Visualizing the Site Minimizing Movement Preventing Contamination Avoiding Removal Problems Later
    • Types of Catheter Securement • Tape • Transparent adhesive dressings • Island dressings • Anchor securement devices • Sutures or staples • Adhesive skin closures (e.g., 3M™ Steri-Strip™ Skin Closures) Infusion Nursing Standards of Practice -2006
    • Types of Catheter Securement Modified Transparent Adhesive Dressings ConMed™ Tri-State Centurion® Veni-Gard® SorbaView® 2000 Window Dressing 3M™ Tegaderm™ Dressing
    • Types of Catheter Securement Modified Tape Shield Anchor Tri-State Centurion® WingGuard® Tri-State Centurion® I.V. House Ultra I.V. House HubGuard® Dressing™ IV Site Protector ™
    • U Taping Technique
    • Chevron Taping Technique
    • Modified Dressings What are the challenges you see here? ?
    • Modified Dressings Modified Dressings with borders & notch: • Protection for the insertion site • Better stabilization • Reduced mechanical stress NOTE: Modified dressings DO NOT replace the need for sutures in CVCs
    • Tips for Challenging Sites • Clip Hair • Turn patient’s head away • Extend the neck fully • Use additional Subclavian and Internal Jugular taping non- tunneled Central Venous techniques Catheter Sites
    • Tips for Challenging Sites  Provide additional securement or taping  Stabilize catheter extensions  Position tape so ports can be accessed Multi-lumen Catheters
    • Today’s Topics 5TIPS FOR SOLVING PROBLEMS 6CATHETER SECUREMENT METHODS 7 SITE ASSESSMENT & COMPLICATIONS 8 DOCUMENTATION
    • IV Site Assessment • FREQUENCY • INFUSATE  Look for signs or symptoms of • ASSESSMENT complications – Insertion site  Identify problems – Patient’s condition early – Patient’s need for therapy
    • Phlebitis What is it?  Inflammation in the walls of the vein  INS scale of 0 - 4 Image Courtesy and © Becton, Dickinson and Company
    • Phlebitis: INS Scale Signs and Symptoms – INS Scale of 0 - 4 – Redness - Erythema (1) (2) (3) (4) – Pain or tenderness along the vein (2) (3) (4) – Edema (2) (3) (4) – Streak formation (3) (4) – Palpable corded vein (3-beg) (4) – Purulent drainage at insertion site (4)
    • Phlebitis Cause Mechanical Chemical Bacterial Failure to scrub hub with alcohol Infusion rate too rapid for vein Solution too acidic or alkaline Improper skin preparation Traumatic insertion X Medications into a small vein Inadequate stabilization X
    • Phlebitis Cause Mech Chem Bact Failure to scrub hub with alcohol Infusion rate too rapid for vein X Solution too acidic or alkaline X Improper skin preparation Traumatic insertion Medications into a small vein X Inadequate stabilization
    • Phlebitis Cause Mech Chem Bact Failure to scrub hub with alcohol X Infusion rate too rapid for vein Solution too acidic or alkaline Improper skin preparation X Traumatic insertion Medications into a small vein Inadequate stabilization
    • Infiltration What is it?  Inadvertent administration of an IV solution into surrounding tissues Image Courtesy of N. Costa
    • Infiltration  Frequent complication  Often goes undetected  Signs  Swelling / Edema  Taut/stretched skin  Cool to the touch  Tenderness at the site  Infusion – sluggish or stopped Image Courtesy of N. Costa
    • Infiltration Causes include: – Improper selection of catheter or site – Catheter gauge too large for the vein – Traumatic insertion – Inadequate securement – Catheter inserted over a joint Source: INS S59-60
    • Extravasation What is it?  Inadvertent administration of a vesicant agent  MUST be identified quickly Image Courtesy and © Becton, Dickinson and Company
    • Extravasation Signs and symptoms include: – Severe pain or burning during infusion – Blotchy redness surrounding the insertion site – Edema at the insertion site – A slowed or stopped infusion rate
    • Extravasation Causes: – Same as for infiltration… BUT occur when…. – A peripheral route is selected – When a central route SHOULD be used Vesicants (irritating agents) – Best administered through CVC
    • Catheter-Related Infection  Identification is crucial  Early detection of local infections can prevent systemic infections PICC Infection Image Courtesy of N. Costa
    • Catheter-Related Infection Signs and Symptoms include: – Erythema or redness – warm to the touch – Tenderness – Swelling – With or without drainage – Changes in heart rate, BP – Elevated temps
    • Check Your Understanding 5. Which signs and symptoms are true of infiltration? Of catheter-related infection? Of phlebitis? Signs and Symptoms Infiltr. CRI Phlebitis Fever X X Taut or stretched skin X Redness at insertion site X X X Tenderness at insertion site X X X Coolness of the skin X Drainage X X Sluggish infusion X
    • Today’s Topics 5TIPS FOR SOLVING PROBLEMS 6CATHETER SECUREMENT METHODS 7SITE ASSESSMENT & COMPLICATIONS 8 DOCUMENTATION
    • Documentation- for insertion of VAD In the medical record include: – Size length, and type of catheter – Name of person who inserted it – Date, time, and insertion site – Complications, patient response, any nursing interventions – Patient teaching and evidence of patient understanding – Number of venipuncture attempts – Medications used
    • Dressing Label Documentation Dressing Label Documentation New PIV CVC Dressing Change Date / time of insertion Date / time of change Device Gauge / size and length Your Initials Your Initials *Dressing change due date * Always review and follow your facility’s policy and procedure for dressing change documentation.
    • Documentation For Complications, document the: • Occurrence and severity of the complication • Size of the catheter and location of insertion • Estimated amount of drainage at the site or the amount of fluid that was infused subcutaneously or infiltrated • Actions taken to treat the complication • Communication with physicians
    • Two Primary Goals of Infusion Therapy Together, well-informed practitioners and correctly performed IV site care form a strong line of defense to improve patient outcomes and prevent complications.
    • For more information or to view other educational programs sponsored by 3M™ Tegaderm™ Transparent Film Dressings, visit: www.3M.com/tegaderm Or www.3M.com/tegadermchg