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  • http://www.nier.go.jp/English/EducationInJapan/Education_in_Japan/Education_in_Japan_files/201109ECEC.pdf http://educationinjapan.wordpress.com Source Citation   (MLA 7th Edition) "Nurseries for sick kids becoming established." Yomiuri Shimbun/Daily Yomiuri 20 Dec. 2005. General Reference Center GOLD.Document URLhttp://go.galegroup.com.ezproxy.torontopubliclibrary.ca/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CA139956664&v=2.1&u=tplmain_z&it=r&p=GRGM&sw=wGale Document Number: GALE|A13995666Wikipedia.com
  • http://futureofchildren.org/futureofchildren/publications/docs/05_03_04.pdfby Sarane Spence Boococwww.cptdb.ca
  • Flickr.com
  • http://photoblog.nbcnews.com/_news/2011/09/01/7553990-earthquake-drills-for-school-children-in-japan?lite
  • oldjapanphoto.wordpress.comwafuworks.blogspot.comTheinquiry.ca
  • Flickr.comwww.city.urasoe.lg.jp
  • Kumon-method.html
  • Document URLhttp://go.galegroup.com.ezproxy.torontopubliclibrary.ca/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CCT4099908268&v=2.1&u=tplmain_z&it=r&p=GRGM&sw=wGale Document Number: GALE|CT4099908268

Child care from a global perspective japan (3) Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Child care from a global perspective Group members Donna Gallimore Catarina Jovita Vesna Adamova Edward Tolin Bora Hwang Sultana Sanjida 1
  • 2. • Introduction• Types of childcare• History/Evolution of service• Underlying philosophy• Availability• Accessibility• Role of ECE / training• Video 2
  • 3. Types of Childcare System 3
  • 4. Age Ranges Ontario Japan• Infants • Infants : 0 month to 18 months : 0 month to 18months• Toddlers • Toddlers : 18 months to 2 ½ years : 18 months 2 ½ or 3years • Preschool/kindergarten• Preschool : 3 years to 6years : 2 1/2years to 5 years • Elementary school• School age : 6 years to 12years : 6 years to 12years
  • 5. Types of childcare system Ontario JapanLicensed Formal • Kindergartens• Childcare centres - Public-run and private-run, both licensed by- 3months to 12years Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT)- Full-time programs and five days a week - 3years to 5years- By the province of Ontario - most are part-time- Must meet the Day Nurseries Standards - focus on education • Daycare centers• Home childcare - Licensed by Ministry of Health, Labor and- 0 to 12 years Welfare (MHLW) - Licensed centers can be Public-run or private-- by agencies run- by nannies, au-pairs, or friends and family - Non-licensed centers do exist and are not under MHLW - 0 to 5years - Most are full-time
  • 6. Types of childcare system Ontario Japan Unlicensed Informal• Nursery school- 2 to 5 years • Non-licensed home- focus on learning experience care/after-school - most 6 to 12 years• After-school and Recreation- 6 to 12 years - focus on studying- such as YMCA, Community center• Family Resource Program • Nanny- focus on supporting parents and caregivers - part-time or full-time :playgroups, drop-ins, resources, toy lending - by agency libraries.etc.
  • 7. History• The first kindergarten opened in 1876. • The first kindergarten opened here in 1882.The first public school opened in Kitchener, Ontario• School year starts in April and ends in March which in January 1857. started around 1900. • School year starts in September and ends in• There are special places set up for children who are ill. June Since 1994, about 500 have been built. The government had planned to increase that number to about 1500 by • IBM has on-site daycare in Markham,Ontario 2009.• In-house daycare has been established since 2011 at IBM in Japan Suddaby Public School -First public school in Ontario 7
  • 8. School buses and school zone sign in Japan School buses and school zone sign in Ontario• . 8
  • 9. Lunch time• Lunch time • In Ontario kids bring or buy their own lunches.• In Japan schools, the students are taught to do things themselves. They clean their school, and Some go home for lunch . make and serve their own lunches . They are very concerned with germs , so the kids serving the food use face masks. 9
  • 10. Earthquake drills are held once a month in Japan schools 10
  • 11. Old school Japan Old School Ontario 11
  • 12. Daycare and schools in Japan The way it is now School uniforms are worn thereNative dress is worn for special occasions 12
  • 13. Kumon started in Japan • Kumon expanded to Ontario in 1980. Kumon English Program (for native Japanese speakers) was launched. The Kumon Recommended Reading List was prepared. First Kumon Center opened in Toronto, Canada (Mrs. Kishibe)• In 1954 Toru Kumon began to teach his eldest son, who was having problems in mathematics at school. Kumon developed the Kumon Method. In 1958, he founded the Kumon Institute of Education after which Kumon Centers began to open around the world. 13
  • 14. Japan’s relationship with Ontario Official state visit to Canada commemorating the 80 year relationship between the two countries Title: The Emperor And Empress Of Japan Visit The Hospital For SickKids In TorontoEmperor Akihito (L) and Empress Michiko of Japan admire the bouquet of flowers presented to them by young children in the ReadingRoom at the Hospital for SickKids in Toronto, Canada on July 9, 2009. The Imperial Couples stop at the hospital was part of theirofficial state visit to Canada commemorating the 80-year relationship between the two countries.UPI Photo/Christine Chew Source Citation (MLA 7th Edition) "The Emperor And Empress Of Japan Visit The Hospital For SickKids InToronto." UPI Photo Collection. United Press International, 2010. General Reference Center GOLD. Web. 9 Feb. 2013. 14
  • 15. Underlying Philosophy Ontario Japan• Children learn through play • Play has essential role in children’s development• Children are the center of the learning curriculum • “Child centered education”• Children’s families are • “Omoiyari” refers to encouraged to actively cooperation participate
  • 16. Underlying philosophy Ontario JapanSome of the philosophical • International philosophical approaches: approaches:• High Scope Montessori, High Scope• Reggio Emilia and Reggio Emilia• Montessori• Behaviorist • Japanese traditional Kodomeon philosophy• Thematic
  • 17. Availability in Japan:•In Japan there is high demand for child care, but there is not enough resources to supply the demand•There are long waiting list in the public and private sector.•Japan government estimates 46, 000 children are on waiting list to get into day care, you must convince the wardoffice that you are desperate if not you remain at the back of the line.• There is a higher demand than supply. Availability in Ontario:•In Ontario there is high demand for child care•In public and private sector there are long waiting list, but not so high like in Japan•In Ontario the demand is higher while the supply is low 17
  • 18. Accessibility Ontario  Licensed Child Care Centres Licensed Home Child Care Centre Japan  Authorized Day Care centre  Non-registered Day Care centre
  • 19. Ontario Licensed Day Care• Most of them have subsidy• Depends on the family income• 0-12 years of age• Must meet Day Nursery Act• Private Day Care centre are privately owned and operated
  • 20. Japan Publicly-funded, publicly- managed Publicly-funded, Privately- managed Privately-funded, Privately- managed
  • 21. Japan  Publicly-funded, publicly- managed• Government subsidy• Depends on family income• “Minimum standards for child welfare facilities” ” Government Act Publicly-funded, Privately- managed• Government certified centre• Facilities standards are higher than city run centre.
  • 22. Japan  Privately-funded, Privately- managed • Run by private sector • Longer hour, six days a week • Not regulated by the government • Standards are usually higher • Parents usually have higher income• http://www.jetro.go.jp/en/reports/market/pd f/200
  • 23. •Designing and implementing curriculum and standards•Improving qualifications, training and working conditions•Engaging families and communities•Advancing data collection, research and monitoring•Setting out quality goals and regulations• http://www.oecd.org/edu/school/JAPAN%20policy%20profile%20-%20published%2028-09-2012.pdf Create a framework for good programs and curriculum •Encourage children to develop in all development and domain •Maintain healthy and safety policies and procedures •Meet each individual child’s basic needs •Partner with parents •Designing and implementing curriculum and standards ( Cox, Class note, week 4 page: 2) http://ecrp.uiuc.edu/v1n2/holloway.html 23
  • 24. ECE need to get Certificate in two ways:1- Finish 4 years education and get 124credits for level 1 certificate2- Finish 2 years education and get 62 credits for level 2 certificatehttp://www.slideshare.net/chenvivian/child-care-in-japan3Here we have two ways to become a Child study leader1- ECE needs to finish two academic years of education to get Diploma2- ECL need to Finish 4 academic years for periods of 8 months to have Bachelor of Early ChildhoodLeadership 24
  • 25. 終わりThe End 25
  • 26. Bibliography• Bibliography• http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Child_care• http://sjls.ca/en/?page_id=8• http://www.ipss.go.jp/webj-ad/webjournal.files/population/2003_6/15.Zou.pdf• http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kindergarten#Japan• http://www.oecd.org/edu/school/JAPAN%20policy%20profile%20-%20published%2028-09-2012.pdf• http://ecrp.uiuc.edu/v1n2/holloway.html• http://www.slideshare.net/chenvivian/child-care-in-japan3• http://www.oeyc.ca/pdf%20files/Every%20Child%20Every%20Opportunity.pdf• http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/childcare/oelf/continuum/continuum.pdf• http://photoblog.nbcnews.com/_news/2011/09/01/7553990-earthquake-drills-for-school-children-in-japan?lite• oldjapanphoto.wordpress.comwafuworks.blogspot.com• The inquiry.ca• Kumon-method.html• Title: The Emperor And Empress Of Japan Visit The Hospital For SickKids In Toronto• Source: UPI Photo Collection.• Document Type: Photograph• Class Notes Week 4• Class Notes Week 5• EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION, An international encyclopaedia, Edited by Rebeca S. New and Moncrieff Cochran 2007 26
  • 27. SUMMARY SHEETChild care in Japan Child care in OntarioThere are private schools called vochien for higher income children. The There are private and public schools in Ontario. For younger ages in themajority of children go to hoikuen which is full-day government subsidized. form of daycare centers with infant/toddler/preschool ages. Kindergarten isSchooling is not mandatory until Grade 1. optional . Mandatory schooling begins in Grade 1.The Japanese school year begins in April and runs until late March with Ontario’s elementary school year run from September to late June withsummer and winter breaks in between. winter break and March break in between.A need for more affordable child care exists. Supply does not meet demand. Subsidized spaces are hard to come by and waiting lists are long.There are facilities in Japan set up primarily for taking care of sick children There are no facilities in Ontario set up to cater to sick childrenIBM operates an in-house child care center in Tokyo, Japan IBM operates an on-site daycare center in Markham, OntarioECE EDUCATION TRAINING in Japan ECE EDUCATION TRAINING in OntarioECE need to get Certificate in two ways: Here we have two ways to become a Child study leader1- Finish 4 years education and get 124credits for level 1 certificate 1- ECE need to finish two academic years of education to get Diploma2- Finish 2 years education and get 62 credits for level 2 certificate 2- ECL need to Finish 4 academic years for periods of 8 months to have Bachelor of Early Childhood LeadershipSome preschools are set up based on religion - Buddhist, Christian, etc. Pre-schools in Ontario generally are non-sectarian and generally inclusive.In Japan schools, the students are taught to do things themselves. They In Ontario, children are responsible for bringing their own lunches fromclean their school, and make and serve their own lunches. Each class is sent home to school.to go pick up their own food•In Japan there is high demand for child care, but there is not enough •In Ontario there is high demand for child careresources to supply the demand •In public and private sector there are long waiting list, but not so high like•There are long waiting list in the public and private sector. in Japan•There is a higher demand than supply •In Ontario the demand is higher while the supply is low 27
  • 28. Summary sheetChild care in Japan Child care in OntarioIn Japans’ case, starting from age of 4, the children begin focusing seriously In Canada, between preschool age of 2 ½ years to 5 years, they focus onon school subjects such as Mathematics and Language development. social and physical development.The childcare system in Japan is divided between formal and informal The childcare system in Canada is mainly divided between licensed andsystem. Kindergartens and daycare centers belong to a formal system. unlicensed system. There are 2 types of licensed childcare system, childcareKindergarten can be publicly or privately run but both are licensed by center and home care. Unlicensed system focuses mainly on after schoolJapan’s Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology activities such as YMCA, Community Centres and other recreational clubs.(MEXT). But daycare centres are licensed by Japan’s Ministry of Health,Labour and Welfare (MHLW). Informal systems in Japan are simply dividedbetween nanny care and after school private tutoring.Underlying philosophy of the Early Childhood education in Japan is based on Underlying philosophy of the Early Childhood Education in Ontario istwo models. reflection of values, beliefs, high standards in curriculum programming,One is called “education through play” or “child centered education”. principles and philosophical approaches. Children are the center of theJapanese believe that children can learn through play and the play has learning curriculum; they are active participants, encouraged by theiressential role in children’s development. educators.Another model is based on some parents believes that children need to learnthrough direct instructions in numeracy, literacy and instrumental music.Kumon developed the Kumon Method. In 1956, Kumon opened Kumon expanded to Canada in 1980. Kumon English Programthe first Kumon Center in Osaka, Japan with the help of parents (for native Japanese speakers) was launched. The Kumonwho were interested in the Method. In 1958, he founded the Recommended Reading List was prepared. First Kumon CenterKumon Institute of Education , after which Kumon Centers opened in Toronto, Canada (Mrs. Kishibe)began to open around the world 28