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assistant referee signal
assistant referee signal
assistant referee signal
assistant referee signal
assistant referee signal
assistant referee signal
assistant referee signal
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assistant referee signal

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  • 1. The assistant referees must raise the flag using the hand that will also be used for the next signalin a sequence. If circumstances change and the other hand must be used for the next signal, theassistant referee should move his flag to the opposite hand below the waist. Throw-In When the ball crosses the touch line near to the assistant referee’s position, the assistant referee must make a direct signal to indicate the direction of the throw-in. When the ball crosses the touch line far from the assistant referee’s position and the throw-in decision is an obvious one, the assistant referee must also make a direct signal to indicate the direction of the throw-in. When the ball crosses the touch line far from the assistant referee’s position but the ball appears still to be in play or if the assistant referee is in any doubt, the assistant referee must raise his flag to inform the referee that the ball is out of play, make eye contact with the referee and follow the referee’s signal. Goal Kick When the ball crosses the goal line near to the assistant referee’s position, the assistant referee must make a direct signal with his/her right hand (better line of vision) to indicate a goal kick. When the ball crosses the goal line near to the assistant referee’s position but the ball appears still to be in play, the assistant referee must first raise his/her flag to inform the referee that the ball is out of play, then indicate it is a goal kick. When the ball crosses the goal line far from the assistant referee’s position, the assistant referee must raise his/her flag to inform the referee that the ball is out of play, make eye contact and follow the referee’s decision. The assistant referee may also make a direct signal if the decision is an obvious one. Corner Kick When the ball crosses the goal line near to the assistant referee’s position, the assistant referee must make a direct signal with his right hand (better line of vision) to indicate a corner kick. When the ball crosses the goal line near to the assistant referee’s position but the ball appears still to be in play, the assistant referee must first raise his/her flag to inform the referee that the ball is out of play, then indicate
  • 2. it is a corner kick.When the ball crosses the goal line far from the assistant referee’sposition, the assistant referee must raise his/her flag to inform the refereethat the ball is out of play, make eye contact and follow the referee’sdecision. The assistant referee may also make a direct signal if thedecision is an obvious one.OffsideThe first action the assistant referee makes after an offside decision is toraise his/her flag. He/She then uses his/her flag to indicate the area of thepitch in which the offence occurred.If the flag is not immediately seen by the referee, the assistant refereemust keep signalling until it has been acknowledged or the ball is clearlyin the control of the defending team.The flag must be raised using the right hand, giving the assistant referee abetter line of vision.SubstitutionWhen dealing with substitutions, the assistant referee must first beinformed by the fourth official. The assistant referee must then signal tothe referee at the next stoppage in the match. The assistant referee doesnot need to move to the halfway line as the fourth official carries out thesubstitution procedure.If there is no fourth official, the assistant referee must assist withsubstitution procedures. In this case, the referee must wait until theassistant referee is back in position before restarting play.FoulsThe assistant referee must raise his/her flag when a foul or misconduct iscommitted in his/her immediate vicinity or out of the referee’s vision. Inall other situations, he/she must wait and offer his/her opinion if it isrequired. If this is the case, the assistant referee must report what he/shehas seen and heard and which players are involved to the referee.Before signalling for an offence, the assistant referee must determine that: the offence was out of the view of the referee or the referee’s view was obstructed the referee would not have applied advantage if he/she had seen
  • 3. the offenceWhen a foul or misconduct is committed, the assistant referee must: raise his/her flag with the same hand that will also be used for the remainder of the signal, this gives the referee a clear indication as to who was fouled make eye contact with the referee give his/her flag a slight wave back and forth (avoiding any excessive or aggressive movement) use the electronic beep signal, if necessaryThe assistant referee must use the “wait and see technique” in order toallow play to continue and not raise his/her flag when the team againstwhich an offence has been committed will benefit from the advantage. Inthis case, it is very important for the assistant referee to make eye contactwith the referee.
  • 4. 1. 1 Signal for a stoppage in play Watch for the flag up! This is the most basic signal the assistant will make. By putting the flag up, they are indicating to the referee that play needs to be stopped for some reason. Typically, when the assistant sees something, they will put up the flag and after the referee blows the whistle will indicate what they saw. If the referee does not see the flag, the assistant will typically begin wiggling/rolling it to attract the referees eye.2. 2 Watch for ball out-of-play and restarts. One of the two main jobs of the assistant is to indicate when the ball is out of bounds and how the game should proceed. Once the referee has blown the whistle, the assistant will indicate how to proceed: o Signal for a throw-in If the assistant raises the flag, at a 45 degree angle, and points it horizontally along the touch line, they are indicating for a throw-in. The team attacking in the direction they are pointing takes the throw. o If the assistant stands near the goal line and points at the goal, they are signalling for a goal kick. o If the assistant stands near the goal line and points at the corner flag, they are signalling for a corner kick.3. 3
  • 5. Watch for offsides. This is initially indicated by a flag straight up in the air, to indicate to the referee that play must be halted. When the referees calls the offside with a whistle, the assistant then holds the flag in one of three positions in front of them to indicate where on the field the offside occurred and thus where the ball should be placed for the freekick. But if the referee gives you a waving gesture it means there was no advantage in play so it continues and you lower your flag. o If they hold the flag up at a 45 degree angle, they are signalling for an offside on the far side of the field (from them). o Signal for offside in middle of field If they hold the flag straight horizontally, they are signalling for an offside in the middle of the field. o If they hold the flag down at a 45 degree angle, they are signalling for an offside on the near side of the field.4. 4 Signal for a substitution Watch for substitutions. If the assistant holds his flag above his head with both hands, he is indicating to the referee that a substitution is being performed and that play should not be started until it is finished.5. 5
  • 6. Watch for the goal signal. When the assistant thinks a goal has been scored, they will lower the flag, optionally may point to center with their hand and sprint back to the center line. If they want to dispute the goal, however, they will put the flag up and stay where they are. 6. 6 Watch for the penalty kick signal. This can vary from region to region. Generally, if a foul is called by the referee and it is inside the penalty area the AR will move toward the corner flag. If the AR stays where they are then it indicates the foul was outside the penalty area. The referee can then determine the appropriate restart. Other possible signals for penalty kicks include holding the flag horizontally across the chest or running to the corner flag and hiding their flag behind their back. 7. 7 Watch for the miscellaneous signal. When the assistant simply keeps the flag straight up after the whistle is blown, he is indicating he needs to talk to the referee. The assistant may show this signal if, for example, a player begins abusing him or he sees outside interference. In particular, if he wishes to indicate that a player deserves a yellow or red card, he will place his hand over hisWhen the referee has signaled a direct free kick foul and makes obvious eye contact with theassistant referee for advice on whether the offense occurred inside the penalty area, the assistantreferee’s signal to indicate that the offense was inside the penalty area is to display the flagacross the lower body. The same signal is also used when the AR has indicated a direct free kickfoul committed by a defender inside the defender’s penalty area. In a change from last year, theAR should insert the new flag signal (display the flag across the lower body) after waggling theflag to indicate the foul and before beginning to move down toward the goal line to take theposition for the recommended penalty kick.
  • 7. In addition, the responsibilities of the lead assistant referee for the taking of a penalty kick (aswell as for kicks from the penalty mark to break a tie) will now clearly include assisting thereferee in determining if a goal has been scored and for indicating if the goalkeeper has movedillegally AND IT MADE A DIFFERENCE. The signal to indicate this is the same as the signaldescribed in the previous paragraph. Referees must be sure to discuss these changes regardingpenalty kick and kicks from the mark situations in their pregame and to be very clear about thecircumstances in which the signal for goalkeeper movement should be given.

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