Northwest Indiana Air Quality - Green Drinks

  • 496 views
Uploaded on

Kathy Luther of the Northwest Indiana Regional Planning Commission presented to Green Drinks on May 16, 2011.

Kathy Luther of the Northwest Indiana Regional Planning Commission presented to Green Drinks on May 16, 2011.

More in: Education , Technology
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
496
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • Churches, Colleges and Universities, Chambers of Commerce, Methodist Hospitals,Inc. Schools, NGOs, NIRPC, NICTD, State Agencies
  • EPA is sitting on proposed attainment redesignations for PM 2.5 due to uncertainty related to implementation of the Clean Air Interstate Rule. CAIR imposed strict caps on SOX and NOX which was promulgated in 2005, courts sent back to EPA 2008, held public hearings on a new proposed rule last summer, and in January this year and is
  • EPA is sitting on proposed attainment redesignations for PM 2.5 due to uncertainty related to implementation of the Clean Air Interstate Rule. CAIR imposed strict caps on SOX and NOX which was promulgated in 2005, courts sent back to EPA 2008, held public hearings on a new proposed rule last summer, and in January this year and is
  • There are two NAAQS for O3. The 1-hour O3NAAQS is exceeded when the day’s highest 1-hour average O3concentration is greater than 0.12 parts per million (ppm). An area does not meet the 1-hour if there are four exceedances in a three calendar year period. The newer 8-hour O3NAAQS was enacted in 1997 to reflect the health concerns from longer exposure at lower concentrations. As of May 2008, an area does not meet the 8-hour O3NAAQS if the 3-year average of each year’s fourth highest 8-hour average O3concentration is greater than 0.075 ppm (the previous standard was 0.08 ppm). Because EPA has ruled that Lake and Porter Counties have attained the revoked 1-hour O3 NAAQS and the 8-hour O3 NAAQS is a greater reflection on long-term health concerns; only the 8-hour O3 NAAQS is presented below in Figure X.The Ozone NAAQS continues to be a moving target. In 2008 EPA lowered the primary and secondary 8-Hour standard for ozone from 0.08 to 0.075 ppm. Then, in 2010 they proposed further lowering the standard to between 0.060 and 0.070. The modeled design values for Northwest Indiana’s air emissions indicate that depending on where the final standard is set, some or all of our counties may return to nonattainment status, requiring a possible revision to the Ozone SIP and additional emission reduction steps to be taken.
  • Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is produced by all forms of combustion from engines, wood burning, open burning, and industrial processes. The annual PM2.5 NAAQS is met when the annual arithmetic mean concentration is less than or equal to 15.0 μg/m3 (parts per billion) The 24-hour PM2.5 NAAQS is met when the three-year average of the 98th percentile of 24-hour concentration is less than 35 μg/m3. The trend of compliance with the annual PM2.5 is a greater indicator of the impact of fine particulate matter on human health and therefore is presented in Figure below.Like the criteria for Ozone, the standards for Fine Particulate Matter are also in a state of uncertainty. In March 2010 EPA released the announced it would reconsider the Annual PM2.5 standard within a range of 11-13 µg/m3 (parts per billion). Depending on where that final standard is designated, Northwest Indiana could again find itself in non-attainment.
  • Churches, Colleges and Universities, Chambers of Commerce, Methodist Hospitals,Inc. Schools, NGOs, NIRPC, NICTD, State Agencies
  • Churches, Colleges and Universities, Chambers of Commerce, Methodist Hospitals,Inc. Schools, NGOs, NIRPC, NICTD, State Agencies
  • Toxics are monitored and regulated differently than the National Ambient Air Quality Criteria Pollutants. Northwest Indiana currently has five Air Toxics monitoring sites operated by the Indiana Department of Environmental Management (IDEM). These are located in Whiting, Hammond, East Chicago, Gary, and Ogden Dunes. Air Toxic monitoring sites are designed to be located in industrial areas where higher than normal concentrations are expected. Air toxics are discussed in two groups: carcinogenic, and non-carcinogenic. Carcinogen risk is evaluated based on the number of cancers likely to occur in one million people, the upper-end carcinogen risk threshhold from USEPA is 100-in-1,000,000. Non-carcinogenic risk is measured in Hazard Quotients. According to a 2008 IDEM report air toxic risk levels in Indiana are comparable to levels normally found in urban areas in the United States. There are three compounds in the state that have been measured at levels of possible concern including acrolein, benzene, and carbon tetrachloride.
  • Toxics are monitored and regulated differently than the National Ambient Air Quality Criteria Pollutants. Northwest Indiana currently has five Air Toxics monitoring sites operated by the Indiana Department of Environmental Management (IDEM). These are located in Whiting, Hammond, East Chicago, Gary, and Ogden Dunes. Air Toxic monitoring sites are designed to be located in industrial areas where higher than normal concentrations are expected. Air toxics are discussed in two groups: carcinogenic, and non-carcinogenic. Carcinogen risk is evaluated based on the number of cancers likely to occur in one million people, the upper-end carcinogen risk threshhold from USEPA is 100-in-1,000,000. Non-carcinogenic risk is measured in Hazard Quotients. According to a 2008 IDEM report air toxic risk levels in Indiana are comparable to levels normally found in urban areas in the United States. There are three compounds in the state that have been measured at levels of possible concern including acrolein, benzene, and carbon tetrachloride.
  • Toxics are monitored and regulated differently than the National Ambient Air Quality Criteria Pollutants. Northwest Indiana currently has five Air Toxics monitoring sites operated by the Indiana Department of Environmental Management (IDEM). These are located in Whiting, Hammond, East Chicago, Gary, and Ogden Dunes. Air Toxic monitoring sites are designed to be located in industrial areas where higher than normal concentrations are expected. Air toxics are discussed in two groups: carcinogenic, and non-carcinogenic. Carcinogen risk is evaluated based on the number of cancers likely to occur in one million people, the upper-end carcinogen risk threshhold from USEPA is 100-in-1,000,000. Non-carcinogenic risk is measured in Hazard Quotients. According to a 2008 IDEM report air toxic risk levels in Indiana are comparable to levels normally found in urban areas in the United States. There are three compounds in the state that have been measured at levels of possible concern including acrolein, benzene, and carbon tetrachloride.
  • Toxics are monitored and regulated differently than the National Ambient Air Quality Criteria Pollutants. Northwest Indiana currently has five Air Toxics monitoring sites operated by the Indiana Department of Environmental Management (IDEM). These are located in Whiting, Hammond, East Chicago, Gary, and Ogden Dunes. Air Toxic monitoring sites are designed to be located in industrial areas where higher than normal concentrations are expected. Air toxics are discussed in two groups: carcinogenic, and non-carcinogenic. Carcinogen risk is evaluated based on the number of cancers likely to occur in one million people, the upper-end carcinogen risk threshhold from USEPA is 100-in-1,000,000. Non-carcinogenic risk is measured in Hazard Quotients. According to a 2008 IDEM report air toxic risk levels in Indiana are comparable to levels normally found in urban areas in the United States. There are three compounds in the state that have been measured at levels of possible concern including acrolein, benzene, and carbon tetrachloride.
  • There are 133
  • There are 133
  • Lawn mower = 45 minutes per week per yearNew standards in effect for 2011 or 2012 machines
  • New boat engine standards in 2008 in effect in 2010 standards
  • Churches, Colleges and Universities, Chambers of Commerce, Methodist Hospitals,Inc. Schools, NGOs, NIRPC, NICTD, State Agencies
  • Actin Inc, East ChicagoAllen Landscaping, PortageBPCerestar, To ElmoodCemetary, to Kvaerner SongerInc Construction, To New York Blower to Whiteco Industries to Wolf Lake Terminals
  • Cities and Towns throughout Northwest Indiana from LaPorte to Whiting, multiple city and county departments,

Transcript

  • 1. Northwest Indiana Air
    What is going on up there?
    Kathy Luther
    Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission
    Green Drinks
    May 16, 2011
  • 2. How’s the air up there?
    NAAQS
    Air Toxics
    Partners for Clean Air
    Things you can do
  • 3. NAAQS
  • 4. EPA Lowering the BAR!
    New SOX Standard 140 75 = 54%
    New Nox Standard – Added Hourly + new monitoring requirements
    New Lead Std. – 1.5 0.15 = 10%
    WE STILL MEET THE STDS!
  • 5. Ozone
  • 6. Fine Particulate
  • 7. How do I know what the air is like NOW!
    http://www.in.gov/idem/airfacts/
  • 8. How do I know what the air is like NOW!
    www.airnow.gov
  • 9. Air Toxics
    5 Monitoring Sites in Northwest Indiana
    Whiting, Hammond, East Chicago, Gary
    Ogden Dunes
    Categories
    Carcinogens
    Non-Carcinogens
    IDEM – Our air is the no better or worse than other urban areas.
  • 10. Air Toxics
    Acrolein– non-carcinogen, found throughout the state, but there are concerns about the monitoring protocols
    Causes congestion, eye and throat irritation
    Used as an aquatic herbicide and in chemical plants
    Most common sources
    Burning tobacco, wood, gas, or oil.
    Downward trends except for Whiting
  • 11. Air Toxics
    Benzene – carcinogen, found throughout the state
    can be naturally occurring, or made for chemical plants
    Oil, gas, coke oven gas, and cigarette smoke
    Downward trends except for Whiting
  • 12. Air Toxics
    NESHAPs
    EPA is establishing National Emission Standards
    Technology Based by source type
    Mobile Source Air Toxics Rule
    4 pollutants of focus incl: Benzene, & DPM
    Focuses on cleaner fuels and engines
  • 13. Who causes all this air pollution?
    YOU!
    ME!
    All of US!
  • 14. Who causes all this air pollution?
    CARS!
    Average Annual emissions
    77 pounds HC
    575 pounds CO
    38 pounds of N0x
    11,450 pounds of CO2 (almost 6 tons)
    Maintain your car- Keep your automobile well tuned and maintained and its tires properly inflated and wheels aligned.
    Drive wisely
    Reduce idling
  • 15. Who causes all this air pollution?
    Yard Care
    Lawnmowers, snow blowers,
    chain saws, leaf vacs
    Source of N0x and HC
    1 lawn mower/snow blower = 22,000 miles driving a new car
    REDUCE MOWING!
    Decrease Lawn area!
    Plant Trees!
  • 16. Who causes all this air pollution?
    Boating
    10 million marine engines in the United States.
    Boat engines HC &(NOx).
    1 boat hour = 348 cars
    Reduce idling and full throttle use
  • 17. Partners for Clean Air?
    Partners for Clean Air is a coalition of Northwest Indiana and Chicago area businesses, industry, and community groups committed to improving air quality through voluntary actions.
  • 18. Who’s it all about?
    Anyone can be a Partner for Clean Air
    Businesses
  • 19. Who’s it all about?
    Anyone can be a Partner for Clean Air
    Communities
  • 20. Who’s it all about?
    Anyone can be a Partner for Clean Air
    Individuals
  • 21. What do Partners Do?
    1. Take a Pledge for Air Quality Action
    www.in.gov/idem/4445.htm
  • 22. What do Partners Do?
    2. Create an Air Quality Action Plan that’s Right For You!
  • 23. What do Partners Do?
    3. Pay Attention
    http://www.in.gov/apps/idem/smog/
  • 24. What do Partners Do?
    4. Implement your Action Plan
  • 25. What can YOU do?
    Top 12 ACTION DAY TIPS:
     
    PICK SOMEONE UP BEFORE YOU GO OUT – Carpool
    USE mass transit, walk, bicycle and/or reduce driving
    TRIP CHAIN- do your errands in one trip instead of
    SKIP THE DRIVE THRU TODAY - Avoid drive-thru service lanes.
    DON'T TOP OFF YOUR TANK - Be careful not to spill gasoline when filling your car or gasoline-powered lawn equipment.
    REFUEL WHEN IT'S COOL - Wait until after 7:00 p.m to refuel your vehicle.
  • 26. What can YOU do?
    Top 12 ACTION DAY TIPS: 
    CONSERVE ENERGY - Participate in your local utility’s energy conservation programs.
    KEEP HOUSEHOLD CONTAINERS SEALED - Seal containers household cleaners, chemicals and solvents to prevent VOC from evaporating into the air and dispose of the containers properly.
    MOW GRASS AFTER 6:00 P.M.
    EAT LUNCH IN THE OFFICE TODAY
    DO NOT IDLE - Idling for 30 seconds uses more fuel than stopping and starting your engine.
    AVIOD USING CHARCOLE GRILL and lighter fluid today.