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Saving lives one mile at a time wehr2
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Saving lives one mile at a time wehr2

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  • 1. Saving  Lives  One  Mile  at  a  Time     Mandie  Wehr,  DVM   Veterinarian   Coastal  Humane  Society   UC  Davis  ASPCA  Fellow     Sandra  Newbury,  DVM   Koret  Shelter  Medicine  Program   Center  for  Companion  Animal  Health   U  C  Davis  School  of  Veterinary  Medicine       This  chart  explores  the  strengths  and  drawbacks  of  state  importation  laws  in  Maine  as  an  example  of  how  to  put  state  requirements  into  context   for  a  transport  program.  In  some  cases,  (green  /  bold)  importation  requirements  may  help  reinforce  recommended  practices  for  transport;  in   others  (red  /italics)  requirements  may  seem  to  have  more  drawbacks  than  strengths.      It  is  useful  for  both  the  source  and  destination  shelters  to   have  a  clear  understanding  of  the  state  laws  for  importation  in  order  to  assess  the  requirements  and  potential  success  of  a  partnership.   Requirements  vary  from  state  to  state  and  may  have  resource  limiting  factors  for  source  shelters.  In  some  cases,  destination  shelters  may  help  to   defer  costs.    Many  shelters  will  expand  their  partnerships  to  include  additional  support  for  a  source  shelter  to  meet  importation  laws  such  as   provision  of  vaccinations,  tests  or  financial  reimbursement  for  animals.  
  • 2.       Maine State Law Vaccine timing Vaccinations required 14 days prior to arrival Distemper, Hepatitis, Parvo Strengths • Vaccination for designated disease processes will have had enough time to be effective • • Infectious Tracheobronchitis Leptospirosis • • Drawbacks • This time limit requires animals to stay in a source shelter’s care (either in shelter or foster care) for 2 weeks with potential additional exposure to contagious disease • LOS and effect on total shelter population (overcrowding, increased exposure to disease, etc.) • Gives a false sense of security especially for puppies and kittens • Some immunity may be present within hours with complete protection developing 3-5 days post-vaccination for core vaccines (not 14 days) These preventable diseases may be life threatening and easily transmitted Vaccination for these disease processes are very effective May decrease clinical signs and severity of disease May decrease clinical signs and severity of disease • • • • • • Testing required Heartworm Ehrlichiosis Lyme Disease • • Allows for identification of positive animals and treatment as needed Allows for state to track results • • • Vaccination does not necessarily prevent infection or shedding Cost limiting for source More likely to cause a vaccine reaction than core standard vaccines According to AAHA guidelines Leptospirosis vaccination is not recommended for use in the Shelter Environment: http://www.aahanet.org/PublicDocuments/CanineVaccineGuidelines.p df Cost & time limiting for source Does not prevent infection or shedding so poses higher risk to public and other animals if infected and not displaying clinical signs of illness Cost & time limiting for source Ehrlichia and Lyme are antibody tests so a positive test may result from previous exposure rather than clinical illness No required preventive follow up (eg. Microfilaricide) to protect against disease spread and support the testing requirement

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