Workshop Handouts
Rick Bacon, AIA

Bacon Group, Inc. Architecture
© Bacon Group, Inc.

HSUS Animal Care Expo
Shelter Desig...
HSUS Animal Care Expo
Daylong Shelter Design Workshop
May 8, 2013
Nashville, Tennessee

The handouts support the following...
Design and Construction Project Definitions and Related Information
Design Consultants and Construction Related
Profession...
Design and Construction Project Definitions and Related Information
Design Phases
Programming - this phase determines both...
Design and Construction Project Definitions and Related Information
Construction
Building Inspector - this representative ...
Design and Construction Project Definitions and Related Information
Design Professionals’ Education, Training, and
Licensi...
Twenty Questions to Ask Your Architect

HOW
DESIGN
WORKS
FOR YOU

1.	 What does the architect see as important issues of
c...
Sustainability Checklist for Architects
SITE DESIGN AND SELECTION
•	 Select site near transit, daily shopping needs and
wo...
Cost Estimates
COST ESTIMATES

Cost estimates
increase in accuracy
as the design
documents progress.
The most accurate
est...
Cost Estimates
Example Preliminary
Cost Estimate
Bacon Group, Inc.

February 18, 2013

Project: Your Humane Society (new +...
Construction Phase 10-12 months
Substantial Completion
Punch List
Close-Out Documentation

Bid Advertising
RFI Review & Ad...
EXAMPLE OF A DESIGN SCHEDULE
This page is left blank on purpose.
Materials and Equipment - Animal Care Facilities
Flooring Materials

Vinyl Composition Tile
•	 Cost Per SF: $
•	 Suppliers...
Materials and Equipment - Animal Care Facilities
(continued)

Kennel / Cages / Condo
Dog & Cat Housing Materials

•	 Nonme...
Materials and Equipment - Animal Care Facilities
Acoustical Materials

Sound Block
•	 Cost Per SF: $$ - $$$
Acoustical Dec...
Materials and Equipment - Animal Care Facilities
(continued)

Special Systems or Equipment

•	 Trench Drains: Hydraulic Tr...
Tips for Selecting a Contractor
•	 Use a local contractor who will have to live in the community
after the project is fini...
Contractor Reference Check
Contractor Name:										
Project Name:										
Name of Reference:										
Date:										...
Additional Resources & Workshop Presentations
These resources are available
from Bacon Group. Contact
Mindy Bacon at 727.7...
Workshop Handouts
Rick Bacon, AIA
HSUS Animal Care Expo
Shelter Design Workshop
Nashville, May 8, 2013
From woof to wow and the cats meow bacon2
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From woof to wow and the cats meow bacon2

  1. 1. Workshop Handouts Rick Bacon, AIA Bacon Group, Inc. Architecture © Bacon Group, Inc. HSUS Animal Care Expo Shelter Design Workshop Nashville, May 8, 2013 This document is digital friendly and it is formatted for double-sided printing.
  2. 2. HSUS Animal Care Expo Daylong Shelter Design Workshop May 8, 2013 Nashville, Tennessee The handouts support the following workshop sessions presented by Rick Bacon, AIA:    Design & Construction Project Organization, Roles & Responsibilities Architectural Design & Materials Construction Observation & Quality Control Handouts included are:           Design and Construction Project Definitions and Related Information Twenty Questions to Ask Your Architect Sustainability Checklist for Architects Cost Estimates Design Schedule Examples Construction Schedule Example Materials and Equipment – Animal Care Facilities Tips for Selecting a Contractor Contractor Reference Check Additional Resources © Richard S. Bacon, AIA, Architect / Bacon Group, Inc., Clearwater, FL Bacon Group, Inc. 2641 Sunset Point Road Clearwater, FL 33759 727.725.0111 phone www.BGArchitects.com If you have questions or need additional information, please contact Mindy Bacon at mindy@bgarchitects.com.
  3. 3. Design and Construction Project Definitions and Related Information Design Consultants and Construction Related Professionals (List is not exhaustive.) Acoustical Consultant - state licensed consultant who is qualified to test noise levels and design or recommend design features that will moderate ambient, external or internal noise levels. Architect - state-licensed consultant who is responsible for the design and coordination of the overall project including site, building and systems. The project architect will serve as the interface between the Owner, consultants and outside agencies. Architectural/Engineering Consultant - design consultant, usually licensed, who has special knowledge of and experience with specific building types or systems required for a project, e.g. swimming pool engineer. Civil Engineer - state-licensed consultant responsible for a project site design including drainage, water management, paving, roadways and utilities related to the project. The civil engineer does not design or landscaping. On larger projects, this engineer is responsible for assisting in the site master planning including traffic flow. Cost Estimator - consultant qualified to review the design documents and prepare Statements of Probable Construction Cost based on project type, prevailing materials costs and labor conditions of the project location. This consultant may also provide value engineering, review construction schedules, pay requests and contractor Change Orders. Environmental Consultant - a variety of usually industry certified or state-licensed consultants qualified to study, recommend, design and perform remedial work concerning a myriad of environmental tasks such as wetlands mitigation, endangered flora and fauna on a site, chemical/fuels contamination or asbestos and lead-based paint abatement. Geotechnical Engineer - state-licensed consultant responsible for testing and determining soil and sub-surface conditions. These test results help determine building placement as well as foundation and pavement design. Investigation may further define environmental and hidden conditions. Landscape Architect - state-licensed consultant responsible for the landscape design, plantings, and irrigation system, some site permitting, and site amenities including lighting, furnishings, accessories, etc. T hese definitions are intended to provide rudimentary information about the professionals and processes commonly encountered during a design and construction project. Almost all design and construction professionals are licensed and regulated by state government. While there are many similarities, these laws vary from state to state. Take the time to educate yourself about the laws, requirements, and regulations of your state before you start your project. Many state licensing boards have consumer education sections on their web sites. Designer/Computer Drafter individuals of widely varying degrees of skill who work under the direct supervision of a licensed architect or engineer to design portions of a project. While manual drafting is still used in some cases, most projects are now designed and drafted with the aid of computer programs such as CADD (computer aided drafting and design). Some advantages of computer drafting are greater accuracy in the construction documents, easier redesigns, and direct communication with engineering consultants and files management. Disciplines transfer current digital drawings to each other via the Internet. Electrical Engineer - state-licensed consultant responsible for all electrical (power and lighting) including site designs for the project; concerned with all communications including telephone and computers, television and power generation, etc. © 2009 Bacon Group, Inc., www.BGArchitects.com, 800.961.1967 LEED® AP - Acronym that means Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Accredited Professional, an accreditation from the U.S. Green Building Council in sustainable design. There may be additional letters after “AP” such as, BD+C that stands for Building Design and Construction. Mechanical Engineer - statelicensed consultant responsible for all the mechanical systems such as HVAC (heating, ventilating, air conditioning) systems. This consultant is often the plumbing engineer, too. Plumbing Engineer - state-licensed consultant responsible for the plumbing and fire suppression systems and may include the water supply, waste water and storm water systems, etc. Roofing Consultant - qualified, and often industry-certified, consultant who evaluates, recommends, designs and reviews the construction of roofing systems for structures. This consultant is often involved in renovations and remedial projects. Structural Engineer - state-licensed consultant responsible for the structural infrastructure of a building including foundations, wall construction, roof framing, etc., conforming to all code requirements including wind and hurricane and snow loads. Threshold Inspectors are also structural engineers. Surveyor - state-licensed consultant responsible for establishing site boundaries including legal descriptions, set backs, easements, etc., existing and new building locations, elevations (grades), utilities, wetlands, trees, etc. Richard S. Bacon, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, CGC Page 1
  4. 4. Design and Construction Project Definitions and Related Information Design Phases Programming - this phase determines both internal and external spaces required for the project. This may include the size, location, relationship to other spaces, furnishings, equipment, and all other support information. Pre-design - site evaluation, existing structure evaluation, space needs planning, investigation into development and permitting requirements, programming, and preliminary floor plans. Schematic - this phase develops the program into a two or three dimensional graphic format. Scale is developed, relationships are further refined, systems are reviewed and materials are evaluated. Basic costs are established. Design Development - this phase refines the schematic phase and establishes in graphic and written format, the entire building including plans, elevations, systems, materials, equipment, etc. A more detailed Statement of Probable Construction Cost is provided. Construction Documents - this phase sets forth in both graphic and written format the construction documents for both bidding and construction. This is the culmination of the design process. A comprehensive Statement of Probable Construction Cost is provided. Bidding - during this phase contractors review the contract documents and contract requirements and submit a fee proposal to complete the construction. This usually includes both cost and construction schedule. The architect is responsible for plan interpretation, clarifications, bid review and recommendations. Negotiation - In lieu of bidding, one to three pre-qualified contractors may be asked to submit a fee for construction that is a negotiated price. This avenue of contractor selection eliminates the time expended during a formal bidding procedure. This may not be possible for government projects. Construction - this is the time where the successful bidder is contracted to complete the construction of the project. Architects/engineers provide construction observation services where members of the design team observe the progress of construction to monitor the building is built according to the intent of the design and according to the permitted construction documents. Product / system submittals and shop drawings are provided by the contractor / sub-contractor for review by the design team to monitor the products and systems specified are being installed. Architects also review/approve contractor’s pay request, perform a “punch-list” review and substantial completion walk-through review. Close-out documents, technical manuals, as-built drawings, and warranty information on the building’s systems, etc., are submitted to the architect for review and submission to the owner. © 2009 Bacon Group, Inc., www.BGArchitects.com, 800.961.1967 Standard Design Phases, Basic and Extended Design Services, and Non-Basic Design Services The standard design and construction phases are sequential. The list of what is considered Basic and Extended Design Services and the services that are Non-Basic Design Services follow. Standard Design and Construction Phases • Schematic Design • Design Development • Construction Documents • Bidding • Construction Observation Basic and Extended Design Services • Basic Design Services - Architecture design - Mechanical, electrical, plumbing engineering design - Structural engineering design • Extended Design Services - Site / civil engineering design - Landscape architecture and irrigation system design - Acoustical design - Fire suppression system design Non-Basic Design Services • Programming • Boundary and Topographical Surveys • Geotechnical Engineering and Soils Testing • Environmental Evaluation, i.e., asbestos and lead-based paint surveys and testing • LEED® Certification • Acoustical Engineering and testing • Security / CCTV systems design • Furniture, Fixtures & Equipment (FF&E) specifications • Permitting and Permit Expediting • Extensive Interiors Design, i.e., furniture systems • Detailed cost estimating • Value Engineering (VE) • Construction Administration (a more extensive version of Construction Observation that has greater legal implications) Permitting Permit Expediter – Individual who coordinates and monitors the site and building documents permitting process, especially in jurisdictions known to have lengthy and complicated review requirements. Plans Reviewers – this representative of a local, state or federal entity is responsible for reviewing and qualifying that construction plans meet local, state, and national building codes, fire safety codes, accessibility codes, etc. Richard S. Bacon, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, CGC Page 2
  5. 5. Design and Construction Project Definitions and Related Information Construction Building Inspector - this representative of a local, state or federal entity is responsible for reviewing the construction relative to the codes of his/her jurisdiction. General Contractor - this entity is responsible for the overall construction of the project including coordination of the sequence of work, sub-contractors and schedule. The contractor is legally contracted with the Owner, not the architect. General Contractors (GC’s) are regulated by the state and usually are state licensed. Sub-contractor - this entity works for the prime contractor for specific areas of construction. The sub-contractor is legally contracted with the prime contractor and most are state licensed in their specialty. Project Manager - works for and is assigned overall construction responsibility from the GC. The superintendent reports primarily to the project manager. The project manager interfaces with the Owner and the architect and engineers (A/E) team. Superintendent - works for the GC and is responsible for the day-to-day supervision of the job site. Project Delivery Methods Design / Bid / Build - this is the most recognized method of project delivery. The Owner selects a design entity to design the project to budget and the Owner’s needs. The contract documents are then bid with the contract awarded to the most responsive (and often the lowest) bidder. The Owner then enters into a contractual relationship with the contractor. The architect and contractor do not have a contractual relationship. Advantages of this method are it is suitable for competitive bidding, has a system of checks and balances, and insurance/ bonding programs are well defined. Disadvantages include diffused responsibility and project delivery may be slow. Always selecting only the lowest bidder may exclude a more qualified contractor who can deliver a better finished product. Design / Build - this method of project delivery is used when the Owner desires a single source of contact and responsibility. Both the architect and contractor act as a single contractual entity. The advantages for the Owner may include faster delivery time, earlier knowledge of construction costs, and lower incidence of claims. Some disadvantages include reduction of checks and balances and not as much assurance that materials and equipment of lesser quality are not being substituted without the Owner’s knowledge. © 2009 Bacon Group, Inc., www.BGArchitects.com, 800.961.1967 Partnering - this method of project delivery requires the owner to enter into contracts with the architect and contractor at about the same time. All three entities work together to establish the most cost effective project. This method endeavors to eliminate adversarial relationships. Construction Management (CM) - a project delivery method where the Owner contracts directly with a Construction Management firm that in turn contracts with the trade contractors. The Owner contracts with the architect. Advantages include preconstruction involvement by the contractor, cost savings and better scheduling. Disadvantages may include too much risk and burden on the Owner while modified CM is not very different from design / bid / build. Contract for Services with Your Design Professional The complexity of your project may determine what kind of contract you will have. Forms of contract include an oral contract, a written contract (letter of intent or letter agreement), a standard form contract (such as one from the American Institute of Architects, AIA), or a customized contract. The purpose of a contact is: • To appropriately allocate the risk between parties. • To avoid ambiguity in connection with the material obligations and responsibilities between parties. • To establish timelines and compensation. The agreement for services with your design professional should include the following elements: • • • • • • Responsibilities on the project Responsibilities of the contracting parties The specific scope of work Compensation for services, including additional services, and how reimbursable expenses will be paid The time period in which work should be performed Under what conditions the relationship may be terminated. C onstruction requires observation to monitor that the project is being constructed according to the permitted plans and your design intent. Eliminating this critical design service in an effort to save money may end up costing you more later to correct changes made in the field or substitutions of different products, finishes, or equipment that do not meet the design criteria. Richard S. Bacon, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, CGC Page 3
  6. 6. Design and Construction Project Definitions and Related Information Design Professionals’ Education, Training, and Licensing Services provided by an architect or engineer are considered professional services like those of a Certified Public Accountant (CPA), medical doctor, or attorney. In general, the following applies: • Architects have earned a professional Bachelor of Architecture or Master of Architecture degree from a college or university that is accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board. • Architects have completed a three-year internship under the supervision of a registered architect before they can sit for their licensing exams. • Architects have passed a multi-part licensing exam administered by the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB). • Architects are licensed and regulated by individual state governments. • Individuals must be licensed before they are allowed to use the title “architect.” Additional Resources A web search for design and construction associations will result in a myriad of choices. Listed below are sources of additional information. • American Institute of Architects, www.aia.org (There are state and local AIA chapters, too.) • National Council of Architectural Registration Boards, www.ncarb.org • American Society of Civil Engineers, www.asce.org • National Society of Professional Engineers, www.nspe.org • Construction web links, www.constructionweblinks.com (See licensing section for links to state licensing boards.) • Associated Builders and Contractors, Inc., www.abc.org • The Associated General Contractors of America, www.agc.org • Design-Build Institute of America, www.dbia.org • Most states require architects to complete continuing • U.S. Green Building Council, www.usgbc.org • Some states license commercial building design • Green Globes, www.greenglobes.com (sustainability education classes before license renewal. architects and residential design architects separately. (sustainability design) design) • Engineers and Landscape Architects are similarly educated, tested, and licensed. • Interior Designers are similarly educated, tested, and licensed (in some states). • Architects may offer all the same services as licensed Interior Designers but not vice versa. • Licensing for General Contractors and construction sub- contractors vary widely so check with your state or local construction licensing board for regulations in your area. Rev. 02/2013 © 2009 Bacon Group, Inc., www.BGArchitects.com, 800.961.1967 Richard S. Bacon, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, CGC Rick Bacon is an architect who specializes in design for the animal care community. He works with humane sheltering, animal control, veterinary, and boarding and day care professionals to design and improve animal care facilities. Rick is the president and principal architect at Bacon Group, Inc., located in Clearwater, Florida. He is a member of the American Institute of Architects (AIA), is a registered architect in 23 states, holds a certificate from the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB), is a LEED Accredited Professional in sustainable building design and construction, and is a Certified General Contractor in the state of Florida. Richard S. Bacon, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, CGC Page 4
  7. 7. Twenty Questions to Ask Your Architect HOW DESIGN WORKS FOR YOU 1. What does the architect see as important issues of consideration in your project? 2. How will the architect approach your project? 3. How will the architect gather information about your needs, goals, etc.? 4. How will the architect establish priorities and make decisions? 5. Who from the architecture firm will be dealing with you directly? Is that the same person who will be designing the project? Who will be designing the project? 6. How interested is the architect in this project? 7. How busy is the architect? 8. What sets this architect apart from the rest? 9. How does the architect establish fees? 10. What would the architect expect the fee to be for this project? 11. What are the steps in the design process? 12. How does the architect organize the process? 13. What does the architect expect you to provide? 14. What is the architect’s design philosphy? 15. What is the architect’s experience / track record with cost estimating? 16. What will the architect show you along the way to explain the project? Will you see models, drawings or sketches? 17. If the scope of the project changes later in the project, will there be additional fees? How will these fees be justified? 18. What services does the architect provide during construction? 19. How disruptive will construction be? How long does the architect expect it to take to complete construction? Source: American Institute of Architects howdesignworks.aia.org 20. Can the architect provide a list of client references? Bacon Group, Inc., www.BGArchitects.com, 800.961.1967 Richard S. Bacon, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, CGC Page 1
  8. 8. Sustainability Checklist for Architects SITE DESIGN AND SELECTION • Select site near transit, daily shopping needs and work. • Select infill site – reduce sprawl. • Restore sites natural system functions. • Design for bioclimatic conditions – passive comfort controls. WATER • Conserve and reuse stormwater. • Reduce potable water consumption for non potable uses. • Reduce off-site treatment of wastewater. • Use gray water systems. • Conserve building water consumption. WASTE In view of these environmental concerns, sustainable design embodies the following goals: • Minimize use of resources. • Minimize waste generated from construction, renovation and demolition of buildings. • Minimize waste generated during building occupancy. • Encourage better management of waste. • Reuse existing buildings. • Design for less material use. • Design building for adaptability. • Design building for disassembly. ENERGY • Use alternative energies and appropriate technologies. • Reduce all energy loads. • Optimize building placement and configuration for passive energy use. • Optimize building envelope thermal performance. • Provide daylighting – all rooms lighting during daylight. • Design efficient systems. • Use efficient electric lighting systems and controls. • Maximize mechanical systems performance. • Use efficient equipment and appliances. • Use renewable or other alternative energy sources. • Simulate total building energy use. • Integrate all systems and reduce total energy use. INDOOR AIR QUALITY (IAQ) • Minimize production and transmission of air pollution. • Zone manage controls to maximize personal comforts. • Control moisture to prevent microbial contamination. • Provide ample ventilation for pollutant control and thermal comfort. • Provide appropriate thermal conditions. • Provide effective lighting. • Provide appropriate building acoustical and vibration conditions. • Provide views, viewspace, and connection to natural environment. Bacon Group, Inc., www.BGArchitects.com, 800.961.1967 MATERIALS • Minimize consumption and depletion of material resources. • Minimize the life-cycle impact of materials on the environment. • Minimize the impact of materials on indoor environmental quality. • Use materials with low environmental impact during their life cycle production. • Use salvaged and remanufactured materials. • Use recycled content products and materials. • Use materials from renewable sources distribution. • Use locally manufactured materials installation. • Use low voc-emitting materials. • Use durable materials. Source: American Institute of Architects Richard S. Bacon, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, CGC Page 1
  9. 9. Cost Estimates COST ESTIMATES Cost estimates increase in accuracy as the design documents progress. The most accurate estimate is obtained through construction estimating and bidding. Preliminary Cost Estimate These are done at the beginning of a project once a program and space needs analysis is complete. For an animal shelter facility, this estimate should reflect your programs and services provided. Bank/Finance Cost Estimate This is an estimate that might be required by the bank if you are seeking financing. It is not an accurate estimate since the estimate is based on very preliminary design. Schematic Design Phase This estimate is usually a per square foot estimate reflecting this level of design and material concepts. Design Development Phase The Design Development estimate is a more detailed and accurate. It should now include quantities and labor based on specification divisions. It should also better define additional costs such as overhead, profit, bond, etc. Construction Documents Phase This is the last estimate provided by the design team and is the closest estimate without formal bidding. Contingency should be around 5%. Construction Bid Estimate This estimate reflects the actual bid prices provided by the contractor or construction manager prior to any negotiations. Guaranteed Maximum Price (GMP) This is the final construction price after negotiations. This will be the basis of the contract for construction. Fantasy Humane Society New Shelter Example Preliminary Cost Estimate 16-Feb-13 Division Total DIVISION 2 - SITE WORK DIVISION 3 - CONCRETE DIVISION 4 - MASONRY DIVISION 5 - METALS DIVISION 6 - WOOD AND PLASTICS DIVISION 7 - THERMAL AND MOISTURE PROTECTION DIVISION 8 - DOORS, WINDOWS AND GLASS DIVISION 9 - FINISHES DIVISION 10 -SPECIALTIES DIVISION 11 - EQUIPMENT DIVISION 12 - FURNISHINGS DIVISION 13 - SPECIAL CONSTRUCTION DIVISION 14 - CONVEYING SYSTEMS DIVISION 15 - MECHANICAL FIRE PROTECTION PLUMBING HVAC DIVISION 16 - ELECTRICAL Building Sub-Total 60,000.00 130,000.00 215,000.00 125,000.00 70,000.00 260,000.00 50,000.00 120,000.00 80,000.00 50,000.00 25,000.00 180,000.00 0.00 50,000.00 225,000.00 300,000.00 200,000.00 $2,140,000.00 Contractor General Conditions (10%) Subtotal 214,000.00 $2,354,000.00 Contractor's OH&P (5%) Design Contingency (10%) Subtotal 117,700.00 235,400.00 $2,707,100.00 P & P Bond & Insurance (0.025%) Estimate Example of Preliminary Cost Estimate by construction specification divisions. Item 67,677.50 $2,774,777.50 Cost per Square Foot $184.99 Prepared by Bacon Group, Inc., February 16, 2013 Note: This cost estimate is a format example for a preliminary cost estimate and is not representative of all projects. © Bacon Group, Inc., www.BGArchitects.com, 800.961.1967 Richard S. Bacon, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, CGC Page 1
  10. 10. Cost Estimates Example Preliminary Cost Estimate Bacon Group, Inc. February 18, 2013 Project: Your Humane Society (new + renovation construction) Format Example for a Preliminary Cost Estimate BG13-007 Richard S. Bacon, AIA Items Quantity Unit Material Line Total 7,140.00 1,326.00 8,466.00 S.F. S.F. $150.00 $175.00 $1,071,000.00 $232,050.00 $1,303,050.00 $153.92 4,240.00 2,884.00 7,124.00 S.F. S.F. $250.00 $125.00 $1,060,000.00 $360,500.00 $1,420,500.00 $199.40 3,850.00 2,809.00 6,659.00 S.F. S.F. $250.00 $125.00 $962,500.00 $351,125.00 $1,313,625.00 $197.27 2,930.00 575.00 3,505.00 S.F. S.F. $200.00 $187.50 $586,000.00 $107,812.50 $693,812.50 $197.95 Training Facility Training Center, Public Seating, Storage, etc. Foyer, Restrooms, Mechanical/Electrical Rooms, Etc. Subtotal Training Facility Dog Housing Areas Suites / Housing, Socialization Areas, Staff Areas, etc. Circulation Subtotal Dog Housing Facility Cat Boarding Facility Free Roaming, Housing Rooms, and Staff Areas, etc. Circulation Subtotal Cat Housing Facility Administration Facility Renovation/Addition Renovations Addition (Conference Room, Vestibule, etc.) Subtotal Administration Renovation/Addition Sub-Total 25,754.00 Estimate Contingency (10%) Total Construction Estimate $4,730,987.50 $473,098.75 $5,204,086.25 Average Cost per Square Foot of all affected areas including the new facilities and the renovation/addition $202.07 Example of Preliminary Cost Estimate using per square foot cost applied to gross square feet per area. © Bacon Group, Inc., www.BGArchitects.com, 800.961.1967 Richard S. Bacon, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, CGC Page 2
  11. 11. Construction Phase 10-12 months Substantial Completion Punch List Close-Out Documentation Bid Advertising RFI Review & Addendum Bid Negotiation & Recommendation Owner Approval Prepare & Submit for Site Permitting Building Permitting Construction Documentation Final Specifications; Final QA/QC Construction Cost Estimate Owner Review & Approval Design Development Phase Draft Specifications Construction Cost Estimate Owner Review & Approval Schematic Design Phase Construction Cost Estimate Owner Review & Approval Award Contract Site & Building Programming Site Survey & Geotechnical Investigation Scheduled Tasks / Milestones BACON GROUP, INC. PROJECT SCHEDULE Month 1 Month 2 Month 4 Month 5 Planning & Design Phase Month 3 Year 1 (Months) Month 6 Month 7 Month 9 Bid & Negotiation Month 8 Construction Phase Year 2 (Quarters) Month10 Month 11 Month 12 Quarter 1 Quarter 2 Quarter 3 Quarter 4 SAMPLE PROJECT DESIGN SCHEDULE
  12. 12. EXAMPLE OF A DESIGN SCHEDULE
  13. 13. This page is left blank on purpose.
  14. 14. Materials and Equipment - Animal Care Facilities Flooring Materials Vinyl Composition Tile • Cost Per SF: $ • Suppliers: Armstrong, Azrock and Tarkett (see below) Sheet Vinyl • Cost Per SF: (Can vary from reasonable to astronomical) $$ - $$$$ • Suppliers: Armstrong (www.armstrong.com) • Forbo, Marmoleum (www.forbo.com) • Tarkett Granit Acoustiflor (www.tarkettna.com) • Mondo Flooring (www.mondoworldwide.com) COST TRIANGLE Material Location Quality Cost Maintenance When choosing materials remember the Cost Triangle: Quality vs. Maintenance vs. Location Porcelain Tile • Cost Per Square Foot: $$$ • Suppliers: • Dal-Tile Corporation (www.daltile.com) • American Olean Tile Co. (www.americanolean.com) • Crossville (www.crossvilleinc.com) • StonePeak Ceramics (www.stonepeakceramics.com) Quarry Tile • Cost Per SF : $$ • Suppliers: American Olean, Dal-Tile Corporation, Lafaenza, Florida Tile, and Buchtal Ceramic Tile • Cost Per SF: $$ • Suppliers: American Olean, Dal Tile, Lafaenza, Florida Tile, and Buchtal, StonePeak Ceramics, among others Grouts • Cost Per SF: $ • Suppliers: Latapoxy SP100 Epoxy Grout, Laticrete Adhesive #4237, and Mapei Karapoxy (www.laticrete.com) Resinous Flooring • Cost Per SF: $$$ • Suppliers: • Stonhard (www.stonhard.com) • Sika Corp. (http://usa.sika.com) • Dur-a-flex, (www.dur-a-flex.com) • Dex-O-Tex, Cheminert, Neotex (www.dex-o-tex.com) Terrazzo • Cost Per SF: $$$ • Vendors like Dex-O-Tex, have a plastic epoxy poured terrazzo-type product that is far less expensive than real terrazzo, yet is as durable. Kennel / Cages / Condo Dog & Cat Housing Materials Cost Scale $ = least expensive $$$$ = most expensive Flooring Materials • Resinous Flooring (See above) • Concrete Sealers, Colors and Hardeners • Integrally colored concrete: Suppliers: True Tone Cement Colors (Davis Colors) Solomon Grind (Chemical Service) © Bacon Group, Inc., www.BGArchitects.com, 800.961.1967 Richard S. Bacon, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, CGC Page 1
  15. 15. Materials and Equipment - Animal Care Facilities (continued) Kennel / Cages / Condo Dog & Cat Housing Materials • Nonmetallic Grit: Supplier: The Burke Company • Dry Shake, Nonmetallic Hardeners: • Suppliers: • Dry Shake (Sonneborn) • Colorcron (Master Builders) • Tnemec Acid Staining, Supplier: L.M. Scoffield Wall Materials • Structural Glazed Tile or Structural Glazed Brick Suppliers: • Elgin-Butler • Astra-Glaze (Trenwyth Industries) • Hanley Brick • Spectra Glaze, the Burns and Russell Company • Fiberglass Wall Board / FRP Suppliers: • Glasboard (Crane Composites) • Glasboard (Kemlite) • Dipcraft MFG (Braddock, PA) • Earth Science • Glass Block Walls Suppliers: • Pittsburgh Corning • Altempco (Amiran) Cages, Modular Kennel Systems, Equipment Suppliers: • Clark Cages (800.461.9972, www.clarkcages.com) • LGL Animal Care Products (979.690.3434, www.lglacp.com) • Mason Co. (800.543.5567, www.masonco.com) • Shor-line / Schroer Manufacturing (800.444.1579, www.Shor-line.com) • Snyder Manufacturing (800.422.1932, www.snydermfg.com) • Suburban Surgical Company (800.323.7366, www.suburbansurgical.com) • T Kennel System (888.551.4060, www.t-kennel.com) • The Cat’s Inn (877.228.7466, www.thecatsinn.com) • Tri-star Metals, Inc. (877.459.7827, www.tristarvet.com) and Direct Animal Products (www.directanimal.com) • VSSI Kennels (800.299.9525, www.vssi.com) Other: • Companion Habitats (pocket pets, reptiles, etc. (888.831.1226, www.companionhabitats.com) • Cat Fence-In (888.738.9099, wwwcatfencein.com) • Houndquarters (custom dog doors) (480.502.9622, www.houndquarters.com) • PurrfectFence (888.280.4066, www.PurrfectFence.com) Cost Scale $ = least expensive $$$$ = most expensive © Bacon Group, Inc., www.BGArchitects.com, 800.961.1967 Richard S. Bacon, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, CGC Page 2
  16. 16. Materials and Equipment - Animal Care Facilities Acoustical Materials Sound Block • Cost Per SF: $$ - $$$ Acoustical Decks • Most deck manufacturers fabricate decking Acoustical Plasters • Cost Per SF: $$$ • Manufacturers: • Pyrok • 3-M acoustical spray Sound Absorbing Wall Panels • Cost Per SY: $$ • Suppliers: • Soundsoak (Armstrong) • Softscape, Capaul, Acoustiflex Corp. • Acoustone Space Units, US Gypsum • Silent Auratone Panels, US Gypsum Company • Tectum, Inc. Sound Stop Fiberboard • Cost Per SY: $$ • Suppliers: Knight - Celotex (www.blueridgefiberboard.com) Paints/Coatings Epoxy Paint: • Cost Per SF: $ • Supplier: • Tile & Epoxy Coating • Porter International • Tile Clad II (Sherwin Williams) • Try-Glaze 4, Gloss or Semi-Gloss (Moore) Acoustical Paints: • Latex Acoustical Ceiling and Wall Paint with ceramic micro-spheres and special sound absorbing filters AND additives that can be mixed with regular paint • Manufacturer: Hy-Tech Thermal Solutions Ceiling Finishes Special Systems or Equipment Cost Scale $ = least expensive $$$$ = most expensive Painted Drywall Suspended Acoustical Tile • Cost Per SF: $1.00, or more if patterned. • Suppliers: Armstrong, US Gypsum Company, Owens Corning, Celotex Floor Drains Systems • Flushing Floor Drains: The Sani-ceptor flushing floor drain is the most commonly used drain. It is 14 inches in diameter with a hinged, perforated grate cover. The inside of the drain is porcelain enamel. The important benefit of this drain is that it can be flushed from controls on the wall so solids can be forced out of the system, which includes out of the P-trap. © Bacon Group, Inc., www.BGArchitects.com, 800.961.1967 Richard S. Bacon, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, CGC Page 3
  17. 17. Materials and Equipment - Animal Care Facilities (continued) Special Systems or Equipment • Trench Drains: Hydraulic Trench Systems, such as those from ACO Polymer Products (800.543.4764, www.acousa.com) or Polydrain Trench Drain System (800.438.6057, abtdrains.com), have been used successfully in canine runs. These can be installed for each individual run so crosscontamination is eliminated. • Individual Kennel Drains: Separate drains in each run are an alternative that reduces the chance of cross-contamination and eliminates the mechanical parts of the above system. Six-inch diameter drains are the smallest indicated unless ALL solids are to be collected before washing the run; with a solid-removal program, four-inch drains are usually adequate. A drawback is the staff washes toward one small target. • Drain Covers: Materials include plastics to stainless steel with stainless preferred. Plants and Greenery Don’t forget plants. They add color, help with acoustics and scale, and provide comfort for animals and people. Richard S. Bacon, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, CGC Rick Bacon is an architect who specializes in design for the animal care community. He works with humane sheltering, animal control, veterinary, and boarding and day care professionals to design and improve animal care facilities. Rick is the president and principal architect at Bacon Group, Inc. located in Clearwater, Florida. He is a member of the American Institute of Architects (AIA), is a registered architect in 23 states, holds a certificate from the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB), is a LEED Accredited Professional in sustainable building design and construction, and is a Certified General Contractor in the state of Florida. Incinerators & Crematoriums Cost: $15,000 and up installed. Suppliers: • B&L Cremation Systems (800.622.5411 www.blcremationsystems.com) • Onex (800.282.6639, www.onexnet.com) • NCE-Crawford-EMCOTEX (800.228.0884, www.animal-creamation.com) • Matthews Cremation Division (888.726.1474, www.matthewscremation.com) • Shenandoah Manufacturing / Agile Mfg., Inc. (800.704.7356, www.shenmfg.com) • Therm-tec (800.292.9163, www.thermtec.com) Note: Do not forget: most of these vendors will guarantee local environmental clearance as part of the sale. Make them put the guarantee in writing! Glass/windows/store-front systems Adds more light, opens facility and allows viewing of pet care areas, surgery, grooming, boarding, etc. Corner Guards Suppliers: • Acrovyn • Tepromark International Notes: 1. As with all such information, manufacturer’s names, phone numbers and prices are guaranteed to change! 2. Many of the products listed here are used for our environmental and sustainable design projects; however, this is not a “green” list of materials. 3. Other vendors for the pet care market can be found in The Humane Society of the United States’ Shelter Pages catalog. http://marketplace.animalsheltering.org/product/shelter Rev. 02/16/2013 © Bacon Group, Inc., www.BGArchitects.com, 800.961.1967 Richard S. Bacon, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, CGC Page 4
  18. 18. Tips for Selecting a Contractor • Use a local contractor who will have to live in the community after the project is finished. Local reputation is everything for a contractor who makes his/her living in the community. • Choose a contractor whose volume of business is approximately three times your project’s value. This way your project will be a significant part of his/her business. On the other hand you don’t want a contractor that is so small that your project represents most of his/her business. If the contractor has problems on the job he/she must have the resources to correct the problem and finish the project. • Visit projects completed by the prospective contractors and talk with the owners. Did the contractor finish on time; did the contractor take care of the punch list in a timely manner; and did the contractor come up with a lot of extra charges? • Does the contractor self-perform much of his/her own work? Contractors who self-perform more of the work simply have more control of the project. • Choose a contractor who has experience building the type of end-use intended for your project. (Note: This is not always an option when constructing an animal care facility. If you are not hiring a designer or contractor that specializes in animal care facilities, compare projects that are similarly complicated such as medical / hospital, institutional / laboratory, and small manufacturing facilities. Knowledge of the requirements and installation of specialized clean environments, HVAC systems, floor finishes, and wall finishes are key.) • Don’t just choose the low bidder. Many times the low bidder did not really study the plans and specs or they desperately need a job for financial reasons. You should closely evaluate bids when there is a 7% difference between the lowest bidder and the next highest bidder. • Verify the contractor’s bonding capability. Original Source: From Architectural Record forum on-line, posted 7/2/08; McGraw Hill Construction. Edits / notes by Bacon Group, Inc. © 2009 Bacon Group, Inc., www.BGArchitects.com, 800.961.1967 Richard S. Bacon, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, CGC Page 1
  19. 19. Contractor Reference Check Contractor Name: Project Name: Name of Reference: Date: 1. Did the contractor meet the construction schedule? If not, was the reason due to the architect or owner or contractor and what caused the delay? 2. Were there any change orders during construction? If so, what was the basis of the change order(s)? 3. Were there any problems with the project that the contractor was responsible for causing? 4. Were there any warranty issues that the contractor failed to take care of? 5. Would you hire the contractor again? If so why? If not, why not? Signature of person checking reference: © 2009 Bacon Group, Inc., www.BGArchitects.com, 800.961.1967 Richard S. Bacon, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, CGC Page 2
  20. 20. Additional Resources & Workshop Presentations These resources are available from Bacon Group. Contact Mindy Bacon at 727.725.0111 or email mindy@bgarchitects.com. Bacon Group’s Basic Guide to Reading Architectural Drawings. Please note that Rick Bacon’s presentations may not be available until after the conference. We recommend you download ASV’s Guidelines for Standards of Care in Animal Shelters. It contains a lot of valuable recommendations related to facility design and primary enclosures for animals. To learn more about Bacon Group and its design work for the animal care community. Association of Shelter Veterinarians http://www.sheltervet.org/ Bacon Group, Inc. Architecture • www.BGArchitects.com • www.S3Shelters.com • Find us on Facebook Bacon Group, Inc. Architecture Bacon Group, Inc., www.BGArchitects.com, 800.961.1967 Richard S. Bacon, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, CGC Page 1
  21. 21. Workshop Handouts Rick Bacon, AIA HSUS Animal Care Expo Shelter Design Workshop Nashville, May 8, 2013

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