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  • I have used a number of sources to accumulate my presentation; I used the web, some of the support documents based on the topic. The main concern is this There is an international and national imperative to include educational technologiesinto teacher training and professional development.
  • In the web the term knowledge society is broadly defined in saying that it refers to any society where knowledge is the primary production resource instead of capital. According to this definition, in knowledge society information that can be transformed into knowledge is seen as an important asset. Hence it is clear that in knowledge society knowledge is taken to be having much value. The main concern is to primarily produce knowledge in such a society. This is where knowledge can be traded for money or could be exchanged for other valuable resources.
  • In a source that that I am going to use throughout this report, the document “towards knowledge society”, the definition on knowledge society is outlined as follows: “Knowledge societies are about capabilities to identify, produce, process, transform, disseminate and use information to build and apply knowledge. “They require an empowering social vision that encompasses plurality, inclusion, solidarity and participation.”A knowledge society should be able to integrate all its members and to promote new forms of solidarity involving both present and future generations.
  • In a knowledge society there are things that are considered important; these are things such as: The human-development and empowermentknowledge and development The political, economic and social Promoting civil and political rights.Freedom of expressionEquality 
  • The term pervasiveness is a noun that comes from the verb “pervade” which means to spread throughout all parts of. Pervasiveness is a noun which means to spread throughout. So when we talk about the pervasiveness of technology we are talking about the spreading of technology. In the society that we live in, we see technology spreading throughout. Therefore it is crucial that we take advantage and use the availability of technology to improve the education system. Technology is about exploring new things, it introduces easy ways of teaching and learning.
  • In the document towards the knowledge society it is mentioned that many experts think that the rapid growth of new technologies might help to overcome a number of constraints that until now have impeded the emergence of knowledge societies, such as geographicalIntroduction. Before the use of technology if you can think about it, one needed to go to school to learn something or if you wanted to know something you had to go where it is given, so if you do not go to get knowledge then you are illiterate. Well, that is not the case anymore, because you can learn without even going to attend a class or anything. You can use you phone, computer to browse the internet and get as much information as possible and then get knowledge. You see it is not so difficult any more, geographical constraints do not matter anymore because I can be informed about what is happening in America while I am in my room in South Africa. Now those are the benefit of technology, the pervading technology.
  • Some paragraph taken from the document “towards knowledge society,” commenting on the contribution of the new technology on creating the knowledge society. Take a look: Are new information technologies a necessary condition for the creation of knowledge societies? If the rise of knowledge societies is accelerated by the dissemination of the new technologies, the contribution of older information and communication technologies, such as books, radio and terrestrial television, will nevertheless be crucial in this process. Thus, alongside the new technologies, electricity and radio transmission have a role to play in building knowledge societies.Now, I guess it is quite clear how the pervasiveness of technology is plying a huge role in promoting knowledge society. 
  • South Africa is aiming to increase the numbers of learners who are enrolled to schools and also encourages accommodating a wide range of people to be educated. This is evident in the plans that they have for 2030. According to the document “Towards knowledge societies”, Issues have risen, questions to be answered, among them are questions about obtaining gender equality, the ability to offer equal opportunities between boys and girls. Finding the appropriate way of approaching education which will ensure that learning societies are open to everyone rather than just being open to the most fortunate such as the countries, families and people that can afford the most appropriate and valued knowledge. Another question asked is how to make sure that education does not end up widening the gap between a more and more educated class of people and people who would have only limited access to quality education? And this is seen as the main pitfall of a global knowledge economy. However, to counter act these challenges, the international community gathered at the World Education Forum in Dakar (26–28 April 2000) and set six basic education for goals all to be reached by 2015.
  • The six Dakar goals as outlined in the document “towards knowledge society” are: 1. Expanding and improving comprehensive early childhood care and education, especially for the most vulnerable and disadvantaged children;2. Ensuring that by 2015 all children, particularly girls, children in difficult circumstances and those belonging to ethnic minorities have access to, and complete, primary education of good quality;3. Ensuring that the educational needs of all young people and adults are met through equitable access to appropriate learning and life-skills programmes;4. Achieving a 50 per cent improvement in levels of adult literacy by 2015, especially for women, and equitable access to basic and continuing education for all adults;5. Eliminating gender disparities in primary and secondary education by 2005 and achieving gender equality in education by 2015, with a focus on ensuring girls’ full and equal access to, and achievement in, basic education of good quality;6. Improving all aspects of the quality of education and ensuring excellence of all so that recognized and measurable learning outcomes are achieved by all, especially in literacy, numeracy and essential life skills.
  • 3. Ensuring that the educational needs of all young people and adults are met through equitable access to appropriate learning and life-skills programmes;4. Achieving a 50 per cent improvement in levels of adult literacy by 2015, especially for women, and equitable access to basic and continuing education for all adults;
  • 5. Eliminating gender disparities in primary and secondary education by 2005 and achieving gender equality in education by 2015, with a focus on ensuring girls’ full and equal access to, and achievement in, basic education of good quality;6. Improving all aspects of the quality of education and ensuring excellence of all so that recognized and measurable learning outcomes are achieved by all, especially in literacy, numeracy and essential life skills.
  • The first goal which is to improve early childhood care and educationAfter the six goals mentioned above have been achieved, then, the challenges that makes it hard to achieve the goal of education for all will be achieved. However, according to my opinion there are many things that should be done to achieve these goals.  
  • The South African Department of education has compiled a national strategic plan document for 2011-2014. In that they have included national strategic objectives which I am going to go through just now. These strategies have been categorised into programmes that are in the department of education. For example Administration is treated as a programme, and the objectives are outlined for this programme. In each programme the national strategic objectives, resource considerations and risk managements are included, but I am only going to present the strategic objectives as well as the risk management on that strategy for the sake of this presentation. As the department of education included the objective statement, baseline, justification and links for each strategic objective, but I will only give the objective statement of each strategic objective which are as follows it is as follows:
  • The South African Department of education has compiled a national strategic plan document for 2011-2014. In that they have included national strategic objectives which I am going to go through just now. These strategies have been categorised into programmes that are in the department of education. For example Administration is treated as a programme, and the objectives are outlined for this programme. In each programme the national strategic objectives, resource considerations and risk managements are included, but I am only going to present the strategic objectives as well as the risk management on that strategy for the sake of this presentation. As the department of education included the objective statement, baseline, justification and links for each strategic objective, but I will only give the objective statement of each strategic objective which are as follows it is as follows:
  • Programme 1: Administration Strategic objective 1.1: Improve capacity of the Department of Basic Education Objective statement: To formulate a comprehensive strategy to ensure that career counselling and the career path from basic education to further education and higher education are formalised.  Strategic Objective 1.2: Strengthen partnerships with all stakeholders, resulting in education becoming a national priority. Objective statement: To ensure that the basic education sector and the country benefit from bilateral and multi-lateral co-operation agreements. To enter into co-operation agreements that are targeted to support education development in South Africa and to share experiences with other developing countries. Strategic Objective 1.3 Improve capacity of the Department of Basic Education Objective statement: To improve inter-governmental co-ordination of policy and education delivery especially with provincial education departments.
  • Programme 1: Administration Strategic objective 1.1: Improve capacity of the Department of Basic Education Objective statement: To formulate a comprehensive strategy to ensure that career counselling and the career path from basic education to further education and higher education are formalised.  Strategic Objective 1.2: Strengthen partnerships with all stakeholders, resulting in education becoming a national priority. Objective statement: To ensure that the basic education sector and the country benefit from bilateral and multi-lateral co-operation agreements. To enter into co-operation agreements that are targeted to support education development in South Africa and to share experiences with other developing countries. Strategic Objective 1.3 Improve capacity of the Department of Basic Education Objective statement: To improve inter-governmental co-ordination of policy and education delivery especially with provincial education departments.
  • Programme 2: Curriculum Policy, Support and Monitoring Strategic Objective 2.1 Improve teacher capacity and practices Objective statement: To incentivise teacher adoption of e-Education by means of a substantial increase in the availability of learning and teaching resources, including the internet. Strategic Objective 2.2 Improve teacher capacity and practices Objective statement: To bring about stability and coherence with respect to the national school curriculum. Strategic Objective 2.3 Improve teacher capacity and practices Objective statement: To pay special attention to improvements in mathematics, physical science and technical subjects at the Further Education and Training band in schools through national programmes. Strategic Objective 2.4 Increase access to high quality learning materials Objective statement: To promote adequate access to learning materials among all learners by means of better national specifications on what every learner requires and a more proactive approach by the national department towards the cost-effective development, reproduction and distribution of materials such as workbooks and textbooks. Strategic Objective 2.5 Increase access to high quality learning materials Objective statement: To establish national norms for school libraries. Strategic Objective 2.6: Improve the quality of early childhood development Objective statement: To create a sound basis for quality pre-Grade 1 education through the promotion of quality learning and teaching materials at this level. Strategic Objective 2.7: Strengthen the capacity of district offices Objective statement: To finalise and promote national screening guidelines that provide for an equitable system of access to special needs support amongst learners.
  • Programme 2: Curriculum Policy, Support and Monitoring Strategic Objective 2.1 Improve teacher capacity and practices Objective statement: To incentivise teacher adoption of e-Education by means of a substantial increase in the availability of learning and teaching resources, including the internet. Strategic Objective 2.2 Improve teacher capacity and practices Objective statement: To bring about stability and coherence with respect to the national school curriculum. Strategic Objective 2.3 Improve teacher capacity and practices Objective statement: To pay special attention to improvements in mathematics, physical science and technical subjects at the Further Education and Training band in schools through national programmes. Strategic Objective 2.4 Increase access to high quality learning materials Objective statement: To promote adequate access to learning materials among all learners by means of better national specifications on what every learner requires and a more proactive approach by the national department towards the cost-effective development, reproduction and distribution of materials such as workbooks and textbooks. Strategic Objective 2.5 Increase access to high quality learning materials Objective statement: To establish national norms for school libraries. Strategic Objective 2.6: Improve the quality of early childhood development Objective statement: To create a sound basis for quality pre-Grade 1 education through the promotion of quality learning and teaching materials at this level. Strategic Objective 2.7: Strengthen the capacity of district offices Objective statement: To finalise and promote national screening guidelines that provide for an equitable system of access to special needs support amongst learners.
  • Programme 2: Curriculum Policy, Support and Monitoring Strategic Objective 2.1 Improve teacher capacity and practices Objective statement: To incentivise teacher adoption of e-Education by means of a substantial increase in the availability of learning and teaching resources, including the internet. Strategic Objective 2.2 Improve teacher capacity and practices Objective statement: To bring about stability and coherence with respect to the national school curriculum. Strategic Objective 2.3 Improve teacher capacity and practices Objective statement: To pay special attention to improvements in mathematics, physical science and technical subjects at the Further Education and Training band in schools through national programmes. Strategic Objective 2.4 Increase access to high quality learning materials Objective statement: To promote adequate access to learning materials among all learners by means of better national specifications on what every learner requires and a more proactive approach by the national department towards the cost-effective development, reproduction and distribution of materials such as workbooks and textbooks. 
  • Programme 3: Teachers, Education Human Resources and InstitutionalDevelopment Strategic Objective 3.1 Improve teacher capacity and practices Objective statement: To ensure that the new teacher development plan, to be made public in 2011, is translated into a wide range of teacher training materials, collaborative professional development activities within the schooling system and agreements with the relevant service providers. Strategic Objective 3.2 Improve teacher capacity and practices Objective statement: To establish the National Institute for Curriculum and Professional Development (NICPD) in order to promote best practices in classroom teaching and teacher development.. Strategic Objective 3.3 Improve teacher capacity and practices Objective statement: To establish an on-going national campaign for choosing teaching as a career, based on research into who becomes a good teacher and focusing on giving the necessary information and bursaries to interested youths. Strategic Objective 3.4 Strengthen school management and promote functional schools Objective statement: To bring about a set of planning, management and accountability tools at the school level that cater for South African needs and make quality education more realisable. Strategic Objective 3.5 Strengthen school management and promote functional schools Objective statement: To develop training strategies and materials aimed at parents that can bring parents more integrally into the new accountability mechanisms being established for schools.Strategic Objective 3.6 Strengthen the capacity of district offices Objective statement: To establish better and evidence-based practices and procedures for the country’s 82 education district offices, including models for school interventions designed to tackle specific school shortcomings.
  • Programme 3: Teachers, Education Human Resources and InstitutionalDevelopment Strategic Objective 3.1 Improve teacher capacity and practices Objective statement: To ensure that the new teacher development plan, to be made public in 2011, is translated into a wide range of teacher training materials, collaborative professional development activities within the schooling system and agreements with the relevant service providers. Strategic Objective 3.2 Improve teacher capacity and practices Objective statement: To establish the National Institute for Curriculum and Professional Development (NICPD) in order to promote best practices in classroom teaching and teacher development.. Strategic Objective 3.3 Improve teacher capacity and practices Objective statement: To establish an on-going national campaign for choosing teaching as a career, based on research into who becomes a good teacher and focusing on giving the necessary information and bursaries to interested youths. Strategic Objective 3.4 Strengthen school management and promote functional schools Objective statement: To bring about a set of planning, management and accountability tools at the school level that cater for South African needs and make quality education more realisable. Strategic Objective 3.5 Strengthen school management and promote functional schools Objective statement: To develop training strategies and materials aimed at parents that can bring parents more integrally into the new accountability mechanisms being established for schools.Strategic Objective 3.6 Strengthen the capacity of district offices Objective statement: To establish better and evidence-based practices and procedures for the country’s 82 education district offices, including models for school interventions designed to tackle specific school shortcomings.
  • Programme 3: Teachers, Education Human Resources and InstitutionalDevelopment Strategic Objective 3.1 Improve teacher capacity and practices Objective statement: To ensure that the new teacher development plan, to be made public in 2011, is translated into a wide range of teacher training materials, collaborative professional development activities within the schooling system and agreements with the relevant service providers. Strategic Objective 3.2 Improve teacher capacity and practices Objective statement: To establish the National Institute for Curriculum and Professional Development (NICPD) in order to promote best practices in classroom teaching and teacher development.. Strategic Objective 3.3 Improve teacher capacity and practices Objective statement: To establish an on-going national campaign for choosing teaching as a career, based on research into who becomes a good teacher and focusing on giving the necessary information and bursaries to interested youths. Strategic Objective 3.4 Strengthen school management and promote functional schools Objective statement: To bring about a set of planning, management and accountability tools at the school level that cater for South African needs and make quality education more realisable. Strategic Objective 3.5 Strengthen school management and promote functional schools Objective statement: To develop training strategies and materials aimed at parents that can bring parents more integrally into the new accountability mechanisms being established for schools.Strategic Objective 3.6 Strengthen the capacity of district offices Objective statement: To establish better and evidence-based practices and procedures for the country’s 82 education district offices, including models for school interventions designed to tackle specific school shortcomings.
  • Programme 4: Planning, Information and Assessment Strategic Objective 4.1Establish a world-class system of standardised national assessments Objective statement: To establish a quality system of standardised and benchmarked learner assessments. Strategic Objective 4.2 Universalise access to Grade R Objective statement: To ensure that all children complete a quality readiness programme in Grade R before they enter formal education in Grade 1. Strategic Objective 4.3 Strengthen school management and promote functional schools Objective statement: To put into places support systems for provinces and schools to improve the physical environs of the school and create enabling conditions for successful teaching and learning..Strategic Objective 4.4: Strengthen the capacity of district offices Objective statement: To ensure that districts can use quality information and data about the level and quality of learning in schools to plan and implement school based improvement programmes.
  • Programme 4: Planning, Information and Assessment Strategic Objective 4.1Establish a world-class system of standardised national assessments Objective statement: To establish a quality system of standardised and benchmarked learner assessments. Strategic Objective 4.2 Universalise access to Grade R Objective statement: To ensure that all children complete a quality readiness programme in Grade R before they enter formal education in Grade 1. Strategic Objective 4.3 Strengthen school management and promote functional schools Objective statement: To put into places support systems for provinces and schools to improve the physical environs of the school and create enabling conditions for successful teaching and learning..Strategic Objective 4.4: Strengthen the capacity of district offices Objective statement: To ensure that districts can use quality information and data about the level and quality of learning in schools to plan and implement school based improvement programmes.
  • ICT stands for Information Communications Technology. Pulling it from the guideline for teacher competencies they use the definition by the programme for International Student Assessment who defines ICT literacy as “the interest, attitude and ability of individuals to appropriately use digital technology and communication tools to access, manage, integrate and evaluate information, construct new knowledge and communicate with each other in order to participate effectively in society”. ICTs can a very good resource to be used in education. As it allows one to construct new Knowledge, manage and evaluate information just to mention a few. There teachers need to have knowledge about and be able to apply ICTs, to modify their teaching and learning process to the better. It is important for the teachers to acquire the skills of ICT education as it is both the national and international strategy to improve the education system.Due to the importance of the subject many articles and documents have been written about teacher competency on ICTs. One of the documents on this topic is the one that I have used to compile my report, which is the “Guidelines for Teacher Training and Professional Development in ICT” from the department of education and the “ICT-enhanced Teacher Standards for Africa”. However, most of my information is from the first mentioned document.
  • In the document “Guidelines for Teacher Training and Professional Development in ICT” there is a section titled; introduction to the teacher development framework. It is here where professional development of teachers with regard to teacher competency standards relating to ICTs and professional aptitude is discussed. Key principles for ICT professional development are given, which are:Educational goals should be primary. The focus should not be on providing technical ICT skills only, but on the use of ICT to achieve learning outcomes.Teacher development programmes should provide teachers with situated/contextualised learning experiences. Programmes should be subject-specific and relevant to the learning areas Teacher development programmes should be needs driven. Programmes should respond to the requirements of subjects such as Computer Application Technology, Information Technology, Geography, Design and Accounting.On-going support should be consistently available. This includes pedagogic support (particularly from subject advisers), technical support and creating communities of practice.Teacher development should be on-going, due to the changing nature of ICT. Programmes should reflect new technologies and applications.
  • In the document “Guidelines for Teacher Training and Professional Development in ICT” there is a section titled; introduction to the teacher development framework. It is here where professional development of teachers with regard to teacher competency standards relating to ICTs and professional aptitude is discussed. Key principles for ICT professional development are given, which are:Educational goals should be primary. The focus should not be on providing technical ICT skills only, but on the use of ICT to achieve learning outcomes.Teacher development programmes should provide teachers with situated/contextualised learning experiences. Programmes should be subject-specific and relevant to the learning areas Teacher development programmes should be needs driven. Programmes should respond to the requirements of subjects such as Computer Application Technology, Information Technology, Geography, Design and Accounting.On-going support should be consistently available. This includes pedagogic support (particularly from subject advisers), technical support and creating communities of practice.Teacher development should be on-going, due to the changing nature of ICT. Programmes should reflect new technologies and applications.
  • The White Paper on e-Education requires that the use of ICT, as a set of flexible tools for teaching and learning, be integrated into the Initial Professional Education of Teachers and Continuing Professional Teacher Development. This means that the teacher should have relevant ICT knowledge and be able to integrate ICTs into the teaching and learning context.It is crucial that there be a development programmes for teachers especially those who qualified before ICT training was introduced to the student teachers in higher education institutions. The guidelines for such programmes are given, but I will only consider two of those which are as follows:Teacher development programmes should be flexible in access, modes of delivery and content in order to make learning possible in meaningful and equitable ways. andTeacher development should be managed.
  • Another thing to consider in the teacher ICT development is the development levels, these helps to know the level at which different teachers are which will determine how much training they need if they have to be trained further.The white Paper on e-education outlines five ICT developmental levels, which are Entry level: The teacher is computer literate but lacks confidence.Adoption level: the teacher is able to use different ICT and teach learners how to use ICT Adaptation level: the teacher is able to use ICT to support everyday classroom activities at an appropriate NCS level, assess the learning that takes place and ensure progression. Productivity increases at this level.Appropriation level: The teacher has a holistic understanding of the ways in which ICT contributes to teaching and learning.Innovation level: The teacher is able to develop entirely new learning environments that use ICT as a flexible tool, so that learning becomes collaborative and interactive.
  • There are also essential skills levels for the integration of ICT into curriculum delivery are:Basic ICT knowledge and skills. These are the knowledge and skills to use ICT at a basic level, and correspond to the entry and adoption levels of the framework.Integrative ICT knowledge and skills. These are the knowledge, skills and values to integrate ICT into the design and practice of teaching and learning, and correspond to the adaptation and appropriation levels of the framework.Specialised ICT knowledge and skills. These focus on the transformational use of ICT to redefine the role of the teacher and classroom environments, and correspond to the innovation level of the framework.
  • In addition, are targets for initial and continuing teacher development, this is where targets and approaches to be adopted for ICT skills development for practising and student teachers are outlined. TargetsAll students leaving higher education for the teaching profession should have reached at least the adoption level. This means that they should have the knowledge and skills to use a computer and application software. Furthermore, they should have the ability to use various ICT, including a computer, to support traditional management, administration, teaching and learning, and be able to teach learners how to use ICT.All practising teachers that have access to ICT should, as a minimum, be trained to the adoption level.The adaptation and appropriation levels focus on the knowledge, skills and values to integrate ICT into teaching and learning. At least 60% of teachers with access to ICT should reach the adaptation level and 20% should reach the appropriation level. Continuing professional development and advanced certificate of education programmes should respond to this target.The innovation level focuses on the transformational use of ICT to redefine the role of the teacher and classroom environments. At this level, entirely new learning environments that use ICT as a flexible tool for whole-school development and for collaborative and interactive learning are developed. The innovation level is a specialisation level and is suited for study at advanced postgraduate levels. At least 10% of practising teachers should reach this level.
  • ApproachesAll higher education institutions should offer compulsory ICT in teaching and learning in teacher development courses (up to appropriation level).Students currently in higher education institutions should be fast-tracked to bring them to at least the adoption level by the end of their studies.From 2008, all students leaving higher education for the teaching profession should have reached at least the adaptation level.All practising teachers who have access to ICT should, as a minimum, be trained to the adaptation level by 2010.Subject advisors are to be trained up to appropriation level through a focused intervention from the national Department of Education. Once trained, they will be able to assist teachers to utilise access to computers
  • Reference ListGuidelines for Teacher Training and Professional Development in ICT (2007) http://goo.gl/aUS8AISTE_2008_NETST.PDFhttps://edulink.uj.ac.za/bbcswebdav/p...Strategic Plan 2011-2014 https://edulink.uj.ac.za/bbcswebdav/p...Towards Knowledge Societies (2005) http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0014...

Transcript

  • 1. Presented by Mr. H Ngobeni22 February 2013
  • 2. Sources Consulted Different Sources were consulted to compile thispresentation Most from the department of education Some of the documents are not necessarily fromSouth Africa Hope you enjoy
  • 3. Knowledge Societies Agenda In the web the term knowledge society is broadlydefined in saying that it refers to any societywhere knowledge is the primary productionresource instead of capital. Knowledge is traded
  • 4. What is Knowledge Society about capabilities to identify, produce,process, transform, disseminateand use information to build and applyknowledge. plurality, inclusion, solidarity and participation Integrate members Promote Solidarity
  • 5. Important things in KnowledgeSocieties.The human-development and empowermentknowledge and developmentThe political, economic and socialPromoting civil and political rights.Freedom of expressionEquality
  • 6. Pervasiveness of Technology The term pervasiveness is a noun that comesfrom the a “pervade” which means to spreadthroughout all parts of. Pervasiveness is a noun which means to spreadthroughout.
  • 7. Impact of Technology The rapid growth of new technologies might helpto overcome a number of constraints that untilnow have impeded the emergence of knowledgesocieties, such as geographical
  • 8. Technology contributing toKnowledge society Information Technologies creates Knowledgesocieties Contribution of old technology such asradio, books…??? Might not be necessary Thus, alongside the newtechnologies, electricity and radiotransmission have a role to play in buildingknowledge societies.
  • 9. Education for All
  • 10. Challenges on Education for all Gender Equity Equal opportunities•Boys and Girls•Poor and the rich
  • 11. Education for all six Dakar GOALS1. Expanding and improving comprehensive earlychildhood care and education, especially for themost vulnerable and disadvantaged children;2. Ensuring that by 2015 all children, particularlygirls, children in difficult circumstances and thosebelonging to ethnic minorities have access to, andcomplete, primary education of good quality;
  • 12. Education for all six Dakar GOALS3. Ensuring that the educational needs of all youngpeople and adults are met through equitableaccess to appropriate learning and life-skillsprogrammes;4. Achieving a 50 per cent improvement in levels ofadult literacy by 2015, especially for women, andequitable access to basic and continuing educationfor all adults;
  • 13. Education for all six Dakar GOALS5. Eliminating gender disparities in primary andsecondary education by 2005 and achieving genderequality in education by 2015, with a focus on ensuringgirls’ full and equal access to, and achievementin, basic education of good quality.6. Improving all aspects of the quality of education andensuring excellence of all so that recognized andmeasurable learning outcomes are achieved byall, especially in literacy, numeracy and essential lifeskills.
  • 14. Education for all six Dakar GOALS
  • 15. Education Belongs to everyone
  • 16. Present future National strategicObjectivesJust wait for the next Slide…..
  • 17. Present future National strategicObjectives Programme 1: Administration Programme 2: Curriculum Policy, Support andMonitoring Programme 3: Teachers, Education HumanResources and Institutional Development Programme 4: Planning, Information andAssessment
  • 18. Program 1: Administration Strategic objective 1.1: To formulate a comprehensivestrategy to ensure that career counselling and the careerpath from basic education to further education and highereducation are formalised. Strategic Objective 1.2: To ensure that the basiceducation sector and the country benefit from bilateraland multi-lateral co-operation agreements. To enter intoco-operation agreements that are targeted to supporteducation development in South Africa and to shareexperiences with other developing countries.
  • 19. Program 1: AdministrationStrategic Objective 1.3: To improve inter-governmental co-ordination of policy andeducation delivery especially with provincialeducation departments.
  • 20. Programme 2: CurriculumPolicy, Support and Monitoring Strategic Objective 2.1: To incentivise teacheradoption of e-Education by means of asubstantial increase in the availability of learningand teaching resources, including the internet. Strategic Objective 2.2: To bring about stabilityand coherence with respect to the nationalschool curriculum.
  • 21. Programme 2: CurriculumPolicy, Support and Monitoring Strategic Objective 2.3: To pay special attention toimprovements in mathematics, physical science andtechnical subjects at the Further Education and Trainingband in schools through national programmes. Strategic Objective 2.4: To promote adequate access tolearning materials among all learners by means of betternational specifications on what every learner requiresand a more proactive approach by the nationaldepartment towards the cost-effective development,reproduction and distribution of materials such asworkbooks and textbooks.
  • 22. Programme 2: CurriculumPolicy, Support and Monitoring Strategic Objective 2.5: To establish national normsfor school libraries. Strategic Objective 2.6: To create a sound basis forquality pre-Grade 1 education through the promotionof quality learning and teaching materials at thislevel. Strategic Objective 2.7: To finalise and promotenational screening guidelines that provide for anequitable system of access to special needs supportamongst learners.
  • 23. Programme 3: Teachers, EducationHuman Resources and Institutional Strategic Objective 3.1:To ensure that the newteacher development plan, to be made public in2011, is translated into a wide range of teachertraining materials, collaborative professionaldevelopment activities within the schooling systemand agreements with the relevant service providers. Strategic Objective 3.2: To establish the NationalInstitute for Curriculum and ProfessionalDevelopment (NICPD) in order to promote bestpractices in classroom teaching and teacherdevelopment.
  • 24. Programme 3: Teachers, EducationHuman Resources and Institutional Strategic Objective 3.3: To establish an on-goingnational campaign for choosing teaching as acareer, based on research into who becomes a goodteacher and focusing on giving the necessaryinformation and bursaries to interested youths. Strategic Objective 3.4: To bring about a set ofplanning, management and accountability tools atthe school level that cater for South African needsand make quality education more realisable.
  • 25. Programme 3: Teachers, EducationHuman Resources and Institutional Strategic Objective 3.5: To develop trainingstrategies and materials aimed at parents that canbring parents more integrally into the newaccountability mechanisms being established forschools. Strategic Objective 3.6: To establish better andevidence-based practices and procedures for thecountry’s 82 education district offices, includingmodels for school interventions designed to tacklespecific school shortcomings.
  • 26. Programme 4:Planning, Information andAssessment. Strategic Objective 4.1: To establish a qualitysystem of standardised and benchmarkedlearner assessments. Strategic Objective 4.2: To ensure that allchildren complete a quality readinessprogramme in Grade R before they enter formaleducation in Grade 1.
  • 27. Programme 4: Planning,Information and Assessment. Strategic Objective 4.3: To put into places supportsystems for provinces and schools to improve thephysical environs of the school and create enablingconditions for successful teaching and learning. Strategic Objective 4.4: To ensure that districts canuse quality information and data about the level andquality of learning in schools to plan and implementschool based improvement programmes.
  • 28. ICTs
  • 29. ICTs ICT stands for Information CommunicationsTechnology ICT literacy as “the interest, attitude and ability ofindividuals to appropriately use digital technologyand communication tools to access, manage,integrate and evaluate information, constructnew knowledge and communicate with eachother in order to participate effectively in society ICTs can a very good resource to be used ineducation
  • 30. Teacher Competency Standardsrelating to ICTs and professionalaptitude Key principles for ICT professional development. Guidelines that should be taken into considerationwhen implementing development programmes. The five ICT developmental levels. The essential skills levels for the integration of ICTinto curriculum delivery. Targets and approaches to be adopted for ICT skillsdevelopment for practising and student teachers areoutlined.
  • 31. Key principles for ICT professionaldevelopmentEducational goals should be primary. The focus should not beon providing technical ICT skills only, but on the use of ICT toachieve learning outcomes.Teacher development programmes should provide teacherswith situated/contextualised learning experiences.Programmes should be subject-specific and relevant to thelearning areasTeacher development programmes should be needs driven.Programmes should respond to the requirements of subjectssuch as Computer Application Technology, InformationTechnology, Geography, Design and Accounting.
  • 32. Key principles for ICT professionaldevelopmentOn-going support should be consistentlyavailable. This includes pedagogic support(particularly from subject advisers), technicalsupport and creating communities of practice.Teacher development should be on-going, dueto the changing nature of ICT. Programmesshould reflect new technologies andapplications.
  • 33. Guidelines.Teacher development programmes should beflexible in access, modes of delivery and contentin order to make learning possible in meaningfuland equitable ways. andTeacher development should be managed.
  • 34. Development Levels Entry level Adoption level Adaptation level Appropriation level Innovation level
  • 35. Skills Levels for the integration ofICTBasic ICT knowledge and skills.Integrative ICT knowledge and skills.Specialised ICT knowledge and skills.
  • 36. TargetsAll students leaving higher education for the teachingprofession should have reached at least the adoptionlevel.All practising teachers that have access to ICT should,as a minimum, be trained to the adoption level.At least 60% of teachers with access to ICT shouldreach the adaptation level and 20% should reach theappropriation level. At least 10% of practising teachers should reach theinnovation level.
  • 37. ApproachesAll higher education institutions should offer compulsory ICT.Students currently in higher education institutions should befast-tracked.From 2008, all students leaving higher education for theteaching profession should have reached at least theadaptation level.All practising teachers who have access to ICT should, as aminimum, be trained to the adaptation level by 2010.Subject advisors are to be trained up to appropriation so theycan assist teachers.
  • 38. Reference ListGuidelines for Teacher Training and ProfessionalDevelopment in ICT (2007) http://goo.gl/aUS8AISTE_2008_NETST.PDFhttps://edulink.uj.ac.za/bbcswebdav/p...Strategic Plan 2011-2014https://edulink.uj.ac.za/bbcswebdav/p...Towards Knowledge Societies (2005)http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0014...