FastShip: Technical Validation MIT: SWAN Codes Seakeeping Analysis MIT: SWAN Codes Seakeeping Analysis SSPA: Resistance...
FastShip: Why the Design Works At higher speeds, SPMH (semi-planing monohull) generates a pressure  At higher speeds, SPMH...
Speed Reduction in Head Seas(M.I.T. Evaluation using SWAN computer codes, verified by extensive tank testing)
Validation of FastShip Technology…
FastShip Concept: Leverage commercial ship withNational Defense Features (NDF)   • NAVSEA has identified NDF for FastShip ...
FastShip: Specific Capabilities for Sea Basing• Selective offload of troops and equipment for specific  missions• At-sea t...
FastShip: Military Speed/Payload/Range at 95% power                             (36 to 41 kts. depending on Range and Payl...
2nd Deck – Armored   Battalion Load-out                                                                  FastShip: Typical...
FastShip Sea-Base
FSS, 72% Faster than LMSR Incl. Suez  Canal, with 12,000 ton load ( * = total    time from CONUS to load deliveredShip    ...
FastShip delivers 50 - 200% greater   lift to Kuwait over 58 days… Tonnes Delivered                                       ...
…and, even if Suez is blocked,FastShip only needs 2.7 days longer  to sail around Africa to Kuwait  DAYS  35  30  25  20  ...
FastShip can be the bridge between existing ships and the    future’s ultra-fast ships: saves 4+ days to the Gulf         ...
FAST Ship Slides B
FAST Ship Slides B
FAST Ship Slides B
FAST Ship Slides B
FAST Ship Slides B
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

FAST Ship Slides B

333

Published on

combatreform.org/STRATEGICMANEUVER

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
333
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • tr
  • How Fast and Slow Hulls Are Slowed Down By Big Seas: Now we compare FastShip and the Slender Monohull with a conventional Container Ship of about the same size as the two other hulls, as the seas get rougher, from calm up to 7.5 Meters Significant Wave Height (25-50 ft. seas). This is the maximum height at which FastShip can operate at full power. In calm conditions, at her maximum cruising speed of 22.5 knots, the Standard container ship will be more efficient than the other two, in ton-mile terms, as a DC- 6 was in still air at 250 knots compared with a 707. However, as the sea gets up the container ship experiences a big loss of speed due to increased drag from plunging and bucking through the waves. This increases her wetted surface and, hence, frictional drag. She has neither the power, the speed, nor the seakeeping ability to get away from a big storm. So, at the ‘red line’ wave height for Fastship, the container ship has had to reduce speed from 22.5 knots to about 14 knots: a reduction of 40 percent. Likewise, the Slender Monohull has to reduce speed from 32 knots to about 22.5 knots: again a reduction of some 30 percent. Yet FastShip only has to reduce speed from 39 knots to 36.5 knots, a reduction of only 8 percent, and is still able to maintain a speed 14 knots faster than the Slender Monohull and 23 knots faster than the container ship – or nearly 3 times its speed. This all provides a welcome increase in reliability – something which has never applied to ocean shipping in the past. (Computed by M.I.T., using SWAN II numerical simulation)
  • FastShip Military Speed/Payload/Range: This chart shows the average speeds over different distances, depending upon the load carried. The ranges given are without any refuelling – although a standard US Navy UNREP facility is recommended as an NDF. FastShip uses the same MDO fuel specification as the U.S. Navy’s gas turbine-powered surface combattants and LMSR’s However, for military sealift operations, FastShip can be rapidly converted to carry strategic loads of equipment and personnel over much-increased distance, by use of the additional fuel capacity within the ship. Standard US Army accommodation units, based on TEU’s, can be carried abaft the bridge. Studies contracted with the US Naval Sea Systems Command have demonstrated the feasibility of these arrangements, enabling the US to maintain a maritime high-speed heavy-lift capability, equivalent to the Civil Reserve Air Fleet maintained by the US airlines. The US Navy study estimated that, equipped with strong-points and extra fuel tanks under the National Defense Features (NDF) program, a ship could be converted to military sealift in about 48 hours. For military operation the full load displacement can be increased to 42,000 tonnes.
  • FAST Ship Slides B

    1. 1. FastShip: Technical Validation MIT: SWAN Codes Seakeeping Analysis MIT: SWAN Codes Seakeeping Analysis SSPA: Resistance & Propulsion, Seakeeping Tank Tests SSPA: Resistance & Propulsion, Seakeeping Tank Tests Danish Technical University: QST, Computer Analysis Danish Technical University: QST, Computer Analysis Trondheim University: Extreme Sea Condition Analysis Trondheim University: Extreme Det Norske Veritas (DNV): Classification to +100A1 CSA-2A Det Norske Veritas (DNV): Classification to +100A1 CSA-2A for Unrestricted Worldwide Operation for Unrestricted Worldwide Operation U.S. Coast Guard: Approval of DNV Class in all aspects U.S. Coast Guard: Approval of DNV Class in all aspects U.S. NavSea: Evaluation of National Defense Features (NDF) U.S. NavSea: Evaluation of National Defense Features (NDF) J.J. McMullen Associates: Due Diligence for Investors J.J. McMullen Due Diligence for Investors
    2. 2. FastShip: Why the Design Works At higher speeds, SPMH (semi-planing monohull) generates a pressure At higher speeds, SPMH (semi-planing monohull) generates a pressure wave under the stern which increases stability and reduces pitching. wave under the stern which increases stability and reduces pitching. This, combined with a deep ‘V’ bow, also reduces bow-slamming and This, combined with a deep ‘V’ bow, also reduces bow-slamming and drag in rough water – and improves water jet efficiency. drag in rough water – and improves water jet efficiency. Due to this pressure wave, vessel becomes progressively more stable Due to this pressure wave, vessel becomes progressively more stable in all axes of motion (roll, pitch, and heave) as speed increases. in all axes of motion (roll, pitch, and heave) as speed increases. Greater beam than conventional fast hulls further increases stability, Greater beam than conventional fast hulls further increases stability, while enhancing the effect of the pressure wave. while enhancing the effect of the pressure wave. 250MW of power combined with high hull mass, speed and stability, 250MW of power combined with high hull mass, speed and stability, matches the energy of oncoming waves. matches the energy of oncoming waves. Robustness of design and redundancy of systems Robustness of design and redundancy of systems assure attainment of performance goals assure attainment of performance goals
    3. 3. Speed Reduction in Head Seas(M.I.T. Evaluation using SWAN computer codes, verified by extensive tank testing)
    4. 4. Validation of FastShip Technology…
    5. 5. FastShip Concept: Leverage commercial ship withNational Defense Features (NDF) • NAVSEA has identified NDF for FastShip • NDF can include: • Stern Door fitted with Ramp; Extra Fuel Capacity; Strengthened deck panels; Personnel Accommodation Modules*, Cranes*, Internal Ramps* and Elevators* • Extra Ventilation and Firefighting Capacity; Austere Mooring; UNREP • Capital cost of NDF is estimated to be $15 - $25 million per ship, depending upon NDF incorporated • A FastShip vessel is always within 48 hours of Philadelphia • Conversion from Commercial to Sealift within 48 hours *Not included in NAVSEA NDF study *Not included in NAVSEA NDF study
    6. 6. FastShip: Specific Capabilities for Sea Basing• Selective offload of troops and equipment for specific missions• At-sea transfer by ramp/crane/helo/VTOL aircraft for ISO containers, oversize equipment, ammo, personnel to LCAC, LCU, ISV etc. LCACs can fly from in/out of stern or carried on top deck via heavy lift cranes, Amphibious armored vehicles can swim selves to shore• Medical or decontamination facility available• Rapid reconstitution of loads in-stream• Logistics/IT• Exceptional stability when stopped in-stream due to wide beam and anti-roll Intering flume tanks.• Capable of carrying self-defensive armament• Possible power-generation for disaster relief
    7. 7. FastShip: Military Speed/Payload/Range at 95% power (36 to 41 kts. depending on Range and Payload) 14000 12000 Nominal Payload Limit (12,000 tons) 2 Armored Battalions (10,069 tons) 10000 36ktPayload - Tons 8000 37kt 6000 2 Air Cav. Sqdns + 1 Arm’d Battn (5,821 tons) 38kt 4000 39kt 2000 4 Air Cavalry Squadrons (1,573 tons) 0 41kt 40kt 0 2000 4000 6000 8000 10000 12000 Range - N. Miles
    8. 8. 2nd Deck – Armored Battalion Load-out FastShip: Typical Load-outEquipment Quantity Deck Area L, W, H Unit Wt. Total Wt. (SQ. FT.) (Inches) Long Tons Long TonsTank M1A2 116 41,296 356x144x104 56.3 6530.8HET Truck 6 1772 370x115x142 17.1 102.4HET Truck 6 2940 515x137x114 14.1 84.6RVY VEH 3 1938 323x144x134 48 287.8TRK 5T 10 2074 311x96x119 14.3 143TRK 1 1/4T 50 7453 265x81x101 8 400TRK 1 1/4T(HMMWV) 50 5570 191x84x74 2.9 145TRK 1/4T 30 1760 132x64x71 1.1 33AH-64 14 6390 603x109x142 6.1 85.4UH-60A 10 5924 496x172x148 4.6 46OH-58 16 426 393x78x115 0.9 14.4 3rd Deck – ArmoredCH-47D 8 5100 612x150x224 13.4 107.2Pers Carr 36 8062 258x125x116 17.9 644.4SP 155M 12 3786 355x126x105 21.9 262.8ACE 4 862 246x126x105 15.8 63.2 Battalion Load-out Subtotal: 95,353 Subtotal: 8,950 25% Stow Factor: 23,838 Tie Downs (12.5%): 1,119 Total Deck Area: 119,191 Total Wt: 10,069 Unused Deck Area: 27,809 Unused Wt. Margin: 1,741
    9. 9. FastShip Sea-Base
    10. 10. FSS, 72% Faster than LMSR Incl. Suez Canal, with 12,000 ton load ( * = total time from CONUS to load deliveredShip Load Voyage Out: Unload Voyage R’nd TripType Time: ashore at SPOD) (Days) Time: (Days) Time: Back: (Days) (Days) (Days)Fast 1.4 10.9 (36 Kt.) 0.3 9.9 (40 Kt.) 22.5Ship (12.6)*FSS 2.5 14.2 (27 Kt.) 2.5 12.9 (30 Kt.) 32.1 (19.2)*LMSR 4 16.6 (23 Kt.) 4 15.9 (24 Kt.) 40.5 (24.6)*Standrd 2 21.6 (17 Kt.) 2 20.4 (18 Kt.) 46Containr (25.6)*/Ro-Ro(SCRC)
    11. 11. FastShip delivers 50 - 200% greater lift to Kuwait over 58 days… Tonnes Delivered Load 3 35000 30000 Load 1 Load 2 25000 Load 2 FSS 20000 FastShip 15000 Load 1 Load 1 Load 1 LMSR 10000 SCRC 5000 0 0 12.6 18.2 21.9 25.6 35.1 49.3 57.6 Days Taken to Deliver from Charleston to Kuwait
    12. 12. …and, even if Suez is blocked,FastShip only needs 2.7 days longer to sail around Africa to Kuwait DAYS 35 30 25 20 FastShip FSS 15 LMSR SCRC 10 5 0 Via Suez Round Africa
    13. 13. FastShip can be the bridge between existing ships and the future’s ultra-fast ships: saves 4+ days to the Gulf New concepts (Trimaran, SES)*: •Expensive to develop (> $1.24 billion each) •Long lead times (> 8 years) •Technology and capability problematic •Only 38% of FastShip payload; range in doubt. *SOURCE: NavSea/USNSWC Carderock Report (NSWCCD – 20 – TR-2002/06), May ‘02

    ×