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Feb/Mar Harrisburg Battalion Newsletter

Feb/Mar Harrisburg Battalion Newsletter

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    Feb Mar 2010newsletter Feb Mar 2010newsletter Document Transcript

    • The Official Publication of Harrisburg Recruiting Battalion FEB/MAR 2010 Vol 1, Issue 4 March Madness Penn State - Fayette Basketball Tournament page 4 STAND PROUD. STAND UNITED. STAND ARMY STRONG
    • CONTENTS FEB/MAR 2010 Vol 1, Issue 4 Departments 6 3 LEADERSHIP CORNER 4 BATTALION NEWS 7 EDUCATION 8 COLD STEEL FAMILY 9 Commander Lt. Col. Stephen B. Lockridge 9 COMPANY CORNER 10 12 ARMY NEWS Command Sgt. Major Command Sgt. Maj. Reginald K. Washington Harrisburg Battalion Vision Chief of Advertising & Harrisburg Battalion is committed to deliver excellence from recruiting with integrity and providing Public Affairs quality service members as the strength of our all-volunteer Army. We strive to consistently achieve mis- Staci Cretu sion and inspire Americans to proudly serve within the profession of arms in support of their Nation. Public Affairs Specialist, Associate Editor Harrisburg Battalion Mission With integrity and selfless service, the Harrisburg Recruiting Battalion provides strength to the Army, Bill Irwin cares for the Soldiers, civilians, and families and develops community support for the military. Administrative Assistant, Layout Design Angela D. Walter 1st Brigade Mission The Battalion Newsletter is authorized by Victory Brigade prospects, processes, and sustains future soldiers to achieve its FY10 precision mission AR360-1 for members of the U.S. Army. Con- requirements within the DA quality marks and resources allocated while simultaneously expanding tents of this publication are not necessarily the both its market and number of partners; executes specified training and Command initiatives though official views, or endorsement by the U.S. Gov- discipline and adhering to standards in accordance with Army Values and Ethos all the while ensuring ernment, Department of Defense, Department the quality of life of its Soldiers, Civilians, and Family members. of the Army, or the U.S. Army Recruiting Com- mand. The Newsletter is published bi-monthly by the Advertising and Public Affairs (A&PA) Office, U.S. Recruiting Battalion - Harrisburg. Please mail or e-mai submissions and letters to: A&PA U.S. Army Recruiting Battalion - Harrisburg, 54 M Ave., Suite 11 New Cumberland, PA 17070 COMM: (717) 770-6721 FAX: (717) 770-2707 E-mail: 1ebn-apa@usarec.army.mil The Newsletter is currently distributed electron- ically and will be sent to everyone on the bat- talion distribution list and to those who request a copy. Deadline submissions for Apr/May. edition is May 15. 2•
    • LEADERSHIP CORNER Keys to Victory Leadership and the daiLy appLication of the soLdier’s creed G reatings Steel Battalion! My previous article addressed transforming the Steel Battalion from “Good to Great” and during our dialogue, while receiving Quarterly Training Briefs from Company leadership and Station Commanders, one thing became glaringly apparent. Leadership will determine our future success. Army leadership is defined as influencing people by providing purpose, direction, and motiva- tion while operating to accomplish the mission and improving the organization. As Officers and NCOs, we Lt. Col. Stephen B. Lockridge cannot accept anything less than the pursuit of exceeding standards (including mission) and instituting Battalion Commander processes that will improve the organization after our departure. However, none of this is possible unless each leader makes a personal commitment to excellence. How do we make this leap and complete our transformation to a better organiza- tion? It is very simple. We must master the fundamentals of our craft, first as a Soldier and then as a recruiter. Guard against complacency and remember the Soldier’s Creed. This creed is the motto that binds us together; it provides purpose to our service. Most importantly, embedded in the Soldier’s Creed is the Warrior Ethos, which reminds us to live the Army Values; place the mission; and never quit, accept defeat, or leave a fallen comrade. To ensure we remain reminded of these principles, I ask each company leadership team and station commander to post the Soldier’s Creed inside their office. Much is required of a leader serving in the best Army the world has ever known. Are you willing to accept that challenge and become the change agent that helps our organization to achieve greatness? Command Sgt Maj. Washington and I believe you are up to the challenge. Now is the time. Let’s get after it, and see you on the high ground! Steel 6 ethics in recruiting “Black and White turns gray” T he Army grooms and develops Soldiers to make critical decisions in the absence or orders. The Army Values, instilled during Basic Training, are the foundation used when making a decision of right and 27-37), is clouded by public opinion, media perception, and their influencers which wrong, or facing Ethical Dilemma. When the results of this decision ap- dilutes their perception of pear clouded, it is considered throughout the command as “walking in “black and white”. This genera- the gray”. tion lives by a different belief The Army Values are an extension of the beliefs that we feel are com- or value system than Soldiers. mon to those of an average person. It is believed that civilians, who Recruiters are grouped with enlist into the Army, possess the same belief or value system. However, “car salesmen”, who are brand- reinforcement of Army Values is believed to be the solution of conflict- ed with the stigma that says, ing values. Therefore, a Recruiter is perceived as an accurate represen- “they are liars”. To facilitate Command Sgt. Maj. Reginald K. Washington Battalion Command Sgt. Major tation of the values of the Army. Recruiters, shape the public’s percep- communication, you must first tion of the Army, and inherently project the values of the Army in the understand and then earn the community. trust of this generation. During the Recruiting Course, recruiters are trained to accurately The clash of ethics between a civilian and a Solider begins to change represent the facts about the Army, opportunities and benefits. They the clear views of what’s black and white. The Soldier, through training, leave with these facts and the Army Values reinforced, which are black develops attributes of protection and defense for the weak. Civilians and white. At this point with no variables that would dilute black and have their natural shield to counter all offensive actions which contra- white, what changes a recruiter’s view to gray? dicts their need for survival. This fuels a recruiter’s ethical justification Regulations, the first variable that blends black and white, are in- to view his decision in a “gray” manner. The recruiter will now choose a tended to be used as interpretations, but only in a manner to qualify course of action based on these clashing factors of ethical values. a Future Soldier. This begins to fog a recruiters understanding of mis- Soldiers, when faced with an ethical dilemma, will make black and sion, beginning the cycle of decision making by Soldiers to determine white decisions common with the Army Values. Therefore, the ultimate right and wrong. challenge is providing recruiters leader support, and information to Effective communication with the target market, Generation X (ages make the ethical choice when all looks “gray”. FEB/MAR 2010 • 3
    • BATTALION NEWS SIGNIFICANT EVENTS On the Cover march madness CG’s Four Pilars: Teamwork, Quality of Life, Army Values, and Standards APRIL - Month of the Military Child 1 Newcomer’s Orientation Penn State - Fayette BaSketBall tournament 4 Easter 4 Hershey BEARS table exhibit - 1E3 Story and photos by Bill Irwin 5-7 ICI - Carlisle Company Public Affairs Specialist 7 Community Covenant - Hazelton City Council- 1E9 Left: Sgt. 1st Class William Foy 9 New Recruiter Board talking to stident durning the tournament. 12-16 Strength In Action Zone - School Blitz - 1E4 19 Orange County Chopper - 1E2 19 Army Heritage and Education Tour 22 Pittsburgh Media Day - 1E5 23 U.S. Army Reserve 102nd Birthday 23-24 Penn State Blue/White Garme - 1E7 MAY 2-6 Our Community Salutes of Pittsburgh - 1E5 6 New Recruiter Board M 7 Newcomer’s Orientation arch Madness hit 10 Community Covenant - Support the Troops Uniontown the first week of the month as more Rally State Capital than 20 colleges in the United 10-14 SIAZ School Challenge - School Blitz - 1E3 States Collegiate Athletic Staff Sgt. Oscar Martinez, Uniontown Recruiting 15 Armed Forces Day - City Island Harrisburg Association descended on Station, receives the 2010 National USCAA program Penn State–Fayette campus from Penn State-Fayette campus Athletic Director, 17-21 SIAZ School Challenge - School Blitz - 1E1 to compete in their national Vince Capozzi. The Army wasone of the title spon- sors of the national basketball tournament. 31 Memorial Day championships. Uniontown Recruiting jUNE Station, who has an excellent relationship with the Fayette campus 11 New Recruiter Board and was asked to participate in this year’s basketball tournament. The 11-12 Army Strong Tour - PA Passing League station ended up being a title sponsor with two speakers at the awards banquet, judging the skills competition, placement of several color 14 Flag Day - Army Birthday guards, signage throughout the gym and a booth directly in front of 24-27 Thunder in the Valley - 1E7 the entrance to the gym. The partnership was not only beneficial for Uniontown recruiters; 27-30 Battalion Educators Tour - Fort Lee, Va. it also provided a forum for the ROTC cadre to interact with the student athletes. Lt. Col. Ron Bonomo from California University of Pennsylvania said, “The synergy between ROTC and recruiting that this outing is creating is wonderful. It is really providing us a foothold here in this community, and I can only see our partnership growing.” During the tournament one on one contact was made with more than 400 prospects, 92 good leads and five appointments were made. This is in addition to any ROTC inquiries that came across the table. Sgt. 1st Class William Foy, station commander at Uniontown expressed, “I was a little surprised at the number of student-athletes that approached us asking about the Army’s tuitionprograms. Even though many of them received at least partial scholarships, the monies they are receiving are minimal when the full tuition payment was taken into account. We plan on following up on each student’s questions now that the tournament is over and they (the students) are back to their day to day college activities.” 4•
    • BATTALION NEWS pinnacle transformation modernization oF the recruiting Force SPOTLIGHT Story and photo by Bill Irwin Public Affairs Specialist O n February 16, Lt. Col. Stephen Lockridge, Irwin, A&PA Harrisburg Battalion Commander, took to the TV studios of Comcast network’s “Local Edition” to explain Lt. Col. Lockridge and jill Horner prepare to Pennsylvania viewers the new program of Pinnacle for Comcast Local Edition five minute interview on Pinnacle. Photo by Bill transformation. Arrangements have been made with the cable network to air the five minute interview in the Harrisburg region sometime in May with a follow up in the Pittsburgh market in June-July. “Local Edition” is a five minute news talk show aired every 20 minutes on the hour and discusses topics of interest regarding, community, political and social, topics in the area. It Devin Howard replaced a similar show titled “Comcast Newsmakers” on the network lineup. Resource Management Specialist Jill Horner, the moderator for the show guided Lockridge through the show’s production process and during the interview allowed him to elaborate on what Pinnacle is, how it is affecting recruiting, and possibly more important how these changes would affect viewers Q: Where did you grow up? and anyone interested in joining the Army. Lockridge detailed how Pinnacle will allow young men and women (and their families) to Salem, NJ experience a more team focused effort, how they will be able to interact with more than one Soldier, and hopefully obtain a larger picture of the Army experience. Q: What’s your background? How did When asked about the possible closing of Army Opportunity Centers, Lockridge assured you end up getting into Resource Horner that not only will the Army remain in the community, but that communities may Management? experience a heightened awareness of the Army in their area as a new state of the art mobile center is deployed throughout the battalion. I spent over 20 years in the United States Marine Corps, retired in 2003. For the past six years hard worK and sacrifices I’ve been working for Harrisburg Recruiting Battalion. In the Marine Corps, my job was finance so that is how I got into resource aFrican-american’S honored management. Q: What has been your most memorable Story and photo by Staci Cretu moment working with the U.S. Army? Chief, A&PA When I won back-to-back Civilian of Year T he U.S. Army takes special pride in acknowledging African-Americans who have served this country with honor and awards!!!! distinction and those who continue to defend Lt. Col. Stephen Lockridge talking with Reading our nation. On Feb. 4, approximately 300 High Schoolers about his Army story. students and faculty of Reading High school gathered for a presentation by Lt. Col. Stephen free, and that through the heroism of those Lockridge, Harrisburg Battalion Commander. who fought and sacrificed before us, we can They were shown the Army sponsored forge a future as bright as the one America’s educational video; For the Love of Liberty. founding fathers envisioned when they wrote The video illustrated a message that must the words that created a Nation. be shared with the America of today, but Through presentations such as this, the most importantly, it is a message that must hard work and sacrifices that African-American be shared with the America of tomorrow. servicemen and women have made continues A 24/7 Resource for Young people across the nation in schools and universities must be aware of the price to shape history in the thoughts, words, and actions of revolutionaries, visionaries, and Military Members, African-Americans paid for liberty, and the part African American’s paid, and still pay for in the dreams of generations today and to come. Spouses & Families its preservation. It is vitally important for us to honor our The presentation and video was an effort history and to learn from it. In doing so, we of the U.S. Army along with Reading High create a future that can sustain our individual Call and Talk Anytime School to remind students that freedom is not and collective success. FEB/MAR 2010 • 5
    • BATTALION NEWS honoring the forgotten students Future SoldierS, SailorS, airmen and marineS By Staci Cretu harrisburg battalion launches TEAMWORK is key to continued success. Chief, A&PA pennsylVania passing league I n May, high schools across Pennsylvania will honor their best and brightest students in their graduating class. The u.s. army & “the sports flash” radio networK scholars, athletes, musicians, artists, class officers and other teaming up for 7-on-7 passing league leaders will step forward to receive honors and recognition for their achievements. As these special students step forward to receive their By Staci Cretu well-deserved honors, there will be a group of students Chief, A&PA who often go unnoticed. The forgotten students; the fu- ture Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen and Marines; students that have bravely committed to preserve our safety and the T he U.S. Army Harrisburg Recruiting Battalion is proud to announce the launch of the Pennsylvania Passing League, the first component of the 2010 Army Strong Tour. The 7-on-7 passing tournament will freedom. For the first time, this year, over 200 schools in Pennsyl- feature high school football players from throughout the Keystone vania will make a difference through Our Community Sa- State. The Pennsylvania Passing League is an opportunity for high lutes of Pittsburgh. Our Community Salutes of Pittsburgh school football teams from across the state to engage in a leadership- a non-profit organization created to recognize and honor developing, team-building, skill-enhancing competition during the graduating high school students (and their parents) who summer. plan to enlist in the armed services after graduation. Depending upon the level of interest and the number of May 6, 2010 at Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Hall in participating teams, the Pennsylvania Passing League may be a Pittsburgh Pa. a formal banquet will be held to honor and single-day state championship event; two regional events (East recognize new enlistees as well as ROTC cadets. The pro- & West) with teams qualifying for a single-day or weekend state gram will be funded by donations from a variety of “stake- championship tournament; or series of state qualifying tournaments holders,” including private citizens, community-based throughout the state with teams qualifying for the single-day state non-profit organizations, veterans groups, local business, championship event. The tentative date for the Pennsylvania Passing education, etc. Honorees will include graduating enlistees League Championship is the weekend of June 11-12. If enough teams (and their parent(s)/guardian) representing all services/ participate, regional qualifiers would be held during the weekend of components (i.e. Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, Coast July 5. The site is to be determined. Guard, National Guard, both active and reserve compo- The structure of Pennsylvania Passing League (PPL) Tournaments nents). Also during the program, one high school educa- will consist of pool play to determine the qualifiers for the single- tor will be recognized with the presentation of the “Colin elimination championship round. For example, with a 16-team PPL Powell Leadership Award,” commending that individual’s tournament, the teams will be broken down into four pools of four commitment to mentoring and supporting young adults teams each. Each team is guaranteed to play three games, with the desiring to serve our nation. top two teams from each pool advancing to an eight-team single- Our Community Salutes Steering Committee is compro- elimination tournament. mised of a group of professionals in the Pittsburgh area Entry fee is $20 per player with a minimum, maximum of 12 players who have made a commitment to support the Military, and per team. A school can enter multiple teams in the tournament. The in particular those young people considering enlistment. cost of the entry fee covers the cost of an official PPL tee-shirt to be worn by all competitors, referees, facility rental, and insurance. Trophies will A simple thank you will go a long way. be awarded to the winning teams as well as the Pennsylvania Passing League Most Valuable Player. A Pennsylvania Passing League All-Star team will also be selected. The 2010 Pennsylvania Passing League is part of the U.S. Army Harrisburg Recruiting Battalion’s 2010 Army STRONG Tour, which includes the Army Iron Man campaign, the Army STRONG Wrestler of the Year, and the Army Rivalry Tour. 6•
    • EDUCATION is key Educators tour preparing for 2010 tour By Mark Mazarella Education Services Specialist (ESS) T he Battalion will conduct its annual Educator/COI Tour to Fort Lee, Vs. 2June 27-30. Fort Lee, located approximately Photos by Angela D. Walter 30 miles south of Richmond, Va., is home to the Quartermas- ter School, and is also the new home for the Ordnance School, Photos of last years Educators tour. Educators went to Fort which is in the process of being relocated from Aberdeen Prov- Rucker, Ala. and Panama City ing Ground under BRAC. Beach, Fl. to experience Avaiation Our tour will focus on Advanced Individual Training (AIT) and and Diver training. Soldier and Family quality of life programs. AIT Military Occupa- tion Specialty (MOS) training at Fort Lee includes Parachute Rigger, Mortuary Affairs Specialist, Petroleum Supply/Laboratory Technician, Water Treatment Specialist, Unit Supply Specialist, Au- tomated Logistical Specialist, Food Service Specialist, and Shower/Laundry and Clothing Repair Rpecialist. In order to accommodate as many educators as possible, we will be traveling to/from Fort Lee in two separate busses departing from Pittsburgh and Harrisburg. Each company should plan to have up to seven educators on the tour. During the tour participants will observe first hand, a sampling of the breadth of training op- portunities available to high school and college graduates in today’s Army. Participants will also learn about other aspects of “Army life,” including Soldier and family housing, education, health care, and morale, welfare and recreation. Recruiters should begin now to identify those educators/Centers of Influence (COI) who are in the best position to directly impact our recruiting mission (i.e. those in direct contact with stu- dents and/or those who make decisions regarding recruiter access), focusing to the maximum extent on our “Must Win/Must Keep” zip codes and targeted schools, with particular emphasis on those schools where market share is below expectations and/or barriers exist. As a secondary priority, commanders may extend invitations to non-educator COIs who, by virtue of their posi- tion, can be a positive influence on our recruiting mission. Please direct questions pertaining to the Ed/COI Tour to the Battalion ESS, at 717-770-6318 or mark.mazarella@usarec.army.mil u.s. a rmy s.t.a.r. club program b ecoming a resource to your schools By Staci Cretu Chief, A&PA The S.T.A.R. Club Program, Students Taking Active Roles, is a foundation: Loyalty, Duty, Respect, Selfless Service, Honor, Integrity, partnership between the high school and the U.S. Army created to and Personal Courage. The Army provides program of instruction, leverage the expertise and resources of local U.S. Army recruiters recruiters provide structure, supervision and mentorship and the to help students develop skills that will enable and encourage faculty advisor (educator) within the school provides school point them to take active roles in their own life, within their families, their of contact and club oversight. Any student with a commitment to school and community, with the ultimate goal of graduating high academic excellence, willingness to do their best, and desire to be a school and creating enriching postsecondary options. The S.T.A.R. part of a team can participate in the S.T.A.R. Club. For more information program employs the Army’s Values-based leadership doctrine as the contact Mark Mazarella, Battalion ESS. FEB/MAR 2010 • 7
    • THE “COLD OUALITY OF LIFE. Families are as important as the annual recruiting mission. STEEL” FAMILY a pril m onth of the m ilitary c hild t he a rmy is committed to m ilitary youth . a rmy family c oVenant : K eeping the p romise For many years, April has been designated as the Month of the Military Child. This is the second year Connect and Join, along with help from retailers across America, will make the Month of the Military Child a truly unique one for all the children. this year AC Moore Stores is joining in as a national chain sponsor, opening up their stores to special Saturday events just for children, and with a focus on the military child during the month of April! w hat is afap a re you an e ffectiVe w hy s hould you c are ? s ponsor ? By Randy Readshaw Soldier & Family Assistance Program Manager By Randy Readshaw Soldier & Family Assistance Program Manager T he Army Family Action Plan (AFAP) is input from the people of the Army to Army leadership. It is a process that lets Soldiers and Families say what’s working, and what isn’t – AND what they think will H ave you been appointed to sponsor an inbound Soldier? If not, chances are you will fix it. It alerts commanders and Army leaders to areas of concern that be during your tour as a Recruiter. The Department need their attention and it gives them the opportunity to quickly put of Defense has created a new Sponsorship Training plans into place to work toward resolving the issues. It often results in Program to help you effectively integrate your legislation, policies, programs and services that strengthen readiness new teammates as efficiently as possible. Check and retention. it out at eSponsorship Application & Training: During a AFAP symposium, delegates are formed into work groups to http://apps.mhf.dod.mil/esat consider and work on issues submitted throughout the year. In February, delegates from Jim Thorpe, Harrisburg, and Greensburg companies met The online application provides: in Reading for the Brigade AFAP symposium. Special thanks go to Sgt. Daniel Sandoval, Sgt. 1st Class Stacey Heygood, and Mrs. Chris Domser • Registration for you and your newcomer for their hard work and willingness to volunteer to have an impact on • Training and certificate for your files Army welfare. If this sounds like something you might like to be a • Sponsorship Duty Checklist part of next year, just let me know. The next symposium is tentatively • Newcomer and family needs assessment scheduled sometime in February 2011. • Congratulations and Welcome letter If you have issues or ideas you would like to see addressed, you can templates and packages submit them at any time at Randy. Readshaw@usarec.army.mil. The • Links to important DoD and Service moving format is rather simple: Title: summarizes the issue what is the issue websites about?; Scope: describes the problem what is the problem and why is • Management and status updates it a problem?; Recommendation: identifies the solution what do you • Reporting module want to have happen? • Customer Satisfaction Surveys Issues fall into one of three categories; Quality of Life, Medical and Dental, or Force Support and Entitlements. 8•
    • COMPANY CORNER Meet Your Penn State University – Fayette Campus – Savannah DiMaio Marketing/Management major, Savannah was asked why she accepted this internship; “I found it College AMbAssAdor to be a great opportunity to increase my marketing experience while working on campus with a well respected organization.” She is looking forward to organizing on campus events in order to promote the Army education programs and job opportunities. Slippery Rock – Gretchen Muri By Staci Cretu Marketing major, Gretchen was asked why she accepted this internship; “This internship Chief, A&PA will further my education in marketing and advertising by promoting a well respected I n a new partnership with UD on Campus (UDOC) and McCain Erickson (agency of record) for the U.S. Army, announced that they will award internship’s at seven Pennsylvania Universities for marketing, advertising and organization such as the U.S. Army.” She feels that she can gain more recognition for Army programs on campus through peer-to-peer business undergraduate degree students. These paid internships have been communications. awarded to students to introduce young people to a variety of U.S. Army education programs and related careers while developing future leaders. The Army Strong Brand Ambassador program was created to provide Lehigh University – Jasmine Hughes skills training while providing college internship credits to those awarded Marketing major, Jasmine was asked why she accepted this internship; “I the opportunity. This program will assist in educating college students about am looking forward to building relationships with students and organizations U.S. Army programs offered to them through their peers. Ambassadors will on campus. I am looking forward to the opportunity to enhance my marketing work to create brand awareness at pre-existing events like Greek life parties, skills while also learning about a brand that I had been pretty unfamiliar organization meetings, sporting events, etc. The ambassadors will learn all with. It seems like an opportunity to work, learn, and have fun.” She believes aspects social media networking well through the ambassador Facebook that she can foster relationships and use resources to help run a successful page, www.facebook.com/armystrongambassador.com. This internship campaign. By using the tools and information she has been given, along with program will be executed during the 2010 Spring and Fall semesters at each her creative abilities, she believes she will be able to give exposure and spark university under direction of UD on Campus (UDOC). All events will fall in line interest among students. with university policies and on-campus marketing guidelines. This internship will provide these seven college students with the chance to gain professional work experience and school credit while engaging Carnegie Mellon – Jon Simon the student body. While skills’ training in the Army is always a priority, so is encouraging college attendance or take continuing education courses. Business major, Jon was asked why he accepted this internship; “I have an interest in Kutztown University – Matt Halper event planning, marketing, and design. I would Marketing/Management major, Matt was asked why he accepted this like to see what I can do with the program to internship; “To gain experience and knowledge in marketing and sales related raise Army awareness.” Jon believes that he can fields.” Matt feels he can help Kutztown University become a more interactive generate a lot of interest in the events, and use campus where students feel comfortable attending events and interacting access to the events to access students. with one another. California University – Rachel Wagner LaRoche University – Tony Schleup Business Management major, Rachel was Marketing/Business major, Tony was asked asked why she accepted this internship; “It’s why he accepted this internship; “I am interested always great to work independently and to in this internship for a number of reasons. For challenge yourself to see what you can do. starters, becoming a Brand Ambassador for the I was interested in the internship to test Army is an honor. As a college student, I am my creative abilities. I realized, also, that it always looking to build my resume. The other gave me a chance to do what I really love reason I chose to take this position is because a doing: talking to people about something good friend of mine recently entered the Army that can genuinely help them.” Rachel and just completed basic training. Due to his would like to increase the genuine interest acceptance and success in the Army, I thought of Cal U students in relation to the Army by this could be my way to help.”Tony wants to bring first spreading awareness. Though people the Army to life on La Roche College campus know what the Army is, the post-graduation by integrating the Army into the culture of La Roche. Once people fully opportunities that are available aren’t clear understand what the Army is about, we can create and establish a stronger to everyone. She will serve as a liaison between the students of Cal U and sense of brand awareness for the Army. Throughout his ten week internship, the local recruiting office in order to build a long lasting, mutually beneficial he plans to integrate the Army into the La Roche Culture and provide a sense relationship between the two. of awareness about the Army to students. FEB/MAR 2010 • 9
    • COMPANY CORNER 2010 niKe regional combine - pittsburgh This Just In... Story and photos by Angela D. Walter Advertising & Public Affairs/Education Assistant promotion E arly on the morning of Feb. 20, Pittsburgh Company recruiters geared up to support the 2010 Nike Football Regional Combine held at the UPMC Sports Performance Center. Photo by Bill Irwin, A&PA As an extension of the 2010 All-American Bowl program, the combine allowed the high school football players, seniors and top underclassmen, to showcase their skills. The players also had the opportunity to get Combine participant completing professionally SPARQ tested. SPARQ stands for one of the SPARQ sections. speed, power, agility, reaction and quickness Cpt. John Swaray counts and allows the player to see their strengths and weaknesses. pull-ups for one of the combine participants During the event, recruiters assisted at many of the five stations the players Maj. William Hammac pins Sgt. 1st Class Daniel Gilke. rotated through. Being able to assist allowed the recruiters face to face speed interaction with many of the players. Before and after the event the recruiters also had the Farewell power opportunity to meet with the players’ parents and area coaches. Richard F. Slippy - Battalion Applications agility Representatives from the University of Pittsburgh ROTC teamed up to make this event Trainer (BAT) reaction a success. QuicKness Left: Sgt. John Baugh congradulates one of the players on his SPARQ stats what are teens doing online? By Staci Cretu ARMY VALUES Chief, A&PA R eading Pa. teens they are accepting “friend requests” from the recruiter team at Reading Recruiting Station. There is no longer any good reason to avoid Facebook for recruiting efforts. The site has crossed a threshold—it is now so widely trafficked that it’s fast becoming a routine aid to social interaction. Reading Recruiting Station has embraced the usage of Facebook within their community by highlighting they’re recruiting efforts. With over 200 fans on their page, Reading is continuing to foster relationships with prospects, community members and future soldiers. Reading Station Commander, Sgt. 1st Class Woodruff attributes Facebook to enhancing the relationship between three potential future soldiers. “I have more high schools friends on Facebook than I ever had in high school!” statement on a recent Facebook page. Like with e-mail and cell phones, and as you begin to use it, you’ll notice more and different situations in which it proves helpful. With so many people on Facebook, it’s now the best, fastest place online to find and connect with a specific person. Ideas from Sgt. 1st Class Woodruff: • When visiting the high schools, all students we speak to we hand out our card with Facebook information • A majority of your high schools will have a Facebook page, research the school and “friend request” students. This allows for further communication with students on their terms. Discipline with • During the Army interview at the station, the recruiter pulls up the Facebook page to show the potential recruit other Future Soldiers and activities that are happening in their area. • FS Orientation and Hometown News Release – During the orientation and when the applicant fills out the Hometown News Release, they inform them that they will be contact via Facebook interaction. Everyone else is on Facebook. Are you? 10 •
    • COMPANY CORNER Stories and photos by Bill Irwin Public Affairs Specialist O n Sunday, Feb. 21 during the American H arrisburg Recruiting Station broke new ground Officers of SAL Squadron #420 and Harrisburg Company Commander Cpt. Eric on Jan. 30 when Harrisburg Sutton look on as Sgt. 1st Class Shawn Legion District 24 meeting, Somerset American Legion Company Commander CPT Eric Smith signs the Community Covenant. Post 181 signed a Community Sutton and Harrisburg Station Covenant with the Armed Commander Sgt. 1st Class Shawn Smith signed a Community Covenant with Forces. Greensburg Sons of the American Legion Squadron #420 located in Steelton, PA. The Company Commander Covenant Signing occurred during the Squadron Awards Dinner. CPT. Terry Redd, Somerset The signing covered several “firsts,” it placed the Squadron as the first station commander Staff Sgt Squadron on record to perform a stand-alone signing in lieu of a joint signing Janet Bailey and Somerset (Back Row L-R) Staff Sgt Janet Bailey, Alexander with the AL Post. It was also the first signing for new station commander recruiter Sgt. Sean Blackburn Dombrowsky, David Koontz, Kirk Moore, George Smith. signed with the Legion. This Knecht, John McNaul, (Front row) Sgt. Sean “I am honored and excited to sign with the Squadron,” said Smith “This is a milestone for the Post as Blackburn, Larry Barclay, Jack Mosholder and evening’s events are providing me with the opportunity to get out in it is the first Covenant to be Cpt. Terry Redd, with the Somerset Armed Forces the community and meet some outstanding individuals that really seem signed in Somerset County. Community Covenant. concerned with each Soldier in my station, and Future Soldiers that may be The Community interested in the Army.” Covenant is a formal affirmation of support by state and local communities to As part of the night activities CPT Sutton was asked to provide the keynote Service members and their Families –Active, Guard and Reserve. speech. During his presentation he relayed his Army story, introduced Smith In addition to the Covenant the Redd presented the Post Commander as the new Harrisburg station commander and incorporated elements of Larry Barclay with a Certificate of Appreciation and letter from the Chief of Black History month to the audience. Sutton addressed how proud he was Staff and Secretary of the Army thanking them for their support. The Post was of all the Soldiers in his company and asked for assistance and support from nominated for the award by Harrisburg Recruiting Battalion Commander LT. the community. Col. Stephen Lockridge. The event was a milestone for the Squadron and was covered by the local During the district meeting Redd was asked to offer his insight about community newspaper, the 326th MPAD, and The Keystone News the state recruiting and retention issues the Post and District was having. After American Legion magazine. weighing in with suggestions and possible solutions Redd and the recruiters Squadron Commander Joseph Rittner stated “We don’t take this were presented a commanders coin and a round of applause for their service commitment lightly; we intend to stand behind the Soldiers in Harrisburg and not only to the country but to the community. offer our services where we can. We want to make a difference.” superintendents’ retreat usarec entertainment team presents reaching out to our educatorS Sgt. 1St claSS Jamie Buckley Courtesy Photo By Cpt. John Swaray Pittsburgh Company Commander Story and photo by Staci Cretu U SAREC Country Music artist Sgt. 1st Class Jamie Buckley performed at the South Allegheny High School on the evening of March 29. The event which lasted for approximately one hour was well attended by students, Chief, A&PA faculty and future soldiers of South Allegheny High School and friends and T he Capital Area Intermediate Unit hosted the Spring 2010 Superintendents’ Retreat at the Bedford Springs Resort in Bedford, Pa. from Tuesday, March 23 through Thursday, March 25, Harrisburg Recruiting Battalion sponsored family members from the McKeesport area. As part of the Pittsburgh Company’s school penetration strategy, the company commander, station commander and recruiters of the Century III the program on Mar. 23. This sponsorship gave the Army exposure to an Recruiting Station coordinated with South Allegheny High School to bring audience with 22 school district superintendents and two vocational-career Buckley to the high school. center directors. Buckley performed for approximately one hour The Battalion Commander, Lt. Col. Stephen Lockridge, Mr. Mark Mazarella, The company commander and first sergeant were on hand to meet ESS and Staci Cretu, Cheif, A&PA attended the conference to provide an faculty and staff of the school and reaffirmed the company’s commitment to overview of Army programs to include: March2 Success, ASVAB, A&PA partnering with the school. They also offered to serve as substitute teachers in programs, Career Exploration, Army Ed Tour, etc. the absence of a teacher, and officiate or assist at school games FEB/MAR 2010 • 11
    • ARMY NEWS army opens expanded women’s museum documents to trace the history of the first women to serve in the chaplaincy.” The U.S. Army Women’s The U.S. Army Women’s Museum is the only Museum held its grand Army museum that focuses on the contributions of females opening and ribbon-cut- who’ve served, and it was only fitting that the month’s obser- ting ceremony for its new expansion during the vance be held there. This year also marked the 30th anniver- Women’s History Month sary of President Jimmy Carter declaring the week of March 8, Program, March 19 at 1980, as the first National Women’s History Week. Fort Lee, Va. From left, Chambers kicked off the program and said the day was Francoise Bonnell, Army dedicated to not only highlighting women’s contributions in Women’s Museum acting director; William Moore, the Army, but also the contributions of the museum. deputy to the command- “Every day, the Army Women’s Museum is doing an amaz- ing general, Combined ing job at rewriting women back into history,” Chambers said. Arms Command and Sustainment of Excellence; retired Command Sgt. Maj. Michele S. Jones, “I hope the time will come that women’s history is just ‘his- special assistant to the Secretary of Defense White House Liaison; Maj. Gen. James E. Cham- tory.’” bers, CASCOM, SCoE and Fort Lee commanding general; retired Maj. Gen. Dee McWilliams, Army Women’s Foundation president; Brig. Gen. Jesse R. Cross, Quartermaster School com- Jones, the guest speaker, said she knows all about being a part of history. By earning command sergeant major of the Communicate and Enforce Standards manding general; and Peggy Trossen, Army Women’s Foundation executive director. U.S. Army Reserve, she was the first woman to serve as com- Story and photo by Amy Perry , Fort Lee Public Affairs mand sergeant major of any of the Army components. She was also the first woman selected as class president at the U.S. FORT LEE, Va. (Army News Service March 23, 2010) -- A seven-year, $800,000 U.S. Sergeants Major Academy. Army Women’s Museum expansion project here, concluded with a March 19 “Writing women back into history is important, as we ribbon-cutting ceremony and Women’s History Month program. know too much of it is left out,” said Jones, as she reflected on The museum expansion includes a new exhibit titled “writing women back the month’s theme. “There is history being made every day. into history,” which corresponds with the Department of Defense theme for the The history is great, and good to know, but it’s the legacy left 2010 Women’s History Month observance. behind that is really important.” About 200 guests attended the event, which included remarks by Maj. Gen. “Accomplishments and achievements tell me what you did James E. Chambers, commanding general of the Combined Arms Support Com- when you lived,” she continued, “but legacy tells me how you mand, Sustainment Center of Excellence and Fort Lee, and featured speaker, re- did it.” tired Command Sgt. Maj. Michele S. Jones, appointed Special Assistant to the Jones said she couldn’t be where she is today without the Secretary of Defense White House Liaison. Also attending the ceremony was re- women who came before her. tired Maj. Gen. Dee McWilliams, Army Women’s Foundation president, and Peg- Serving in the military has not always been considered as gy Trossen, AWF executive director. AWF was responsible for raising the funds for a typical path for women, Jones said, but women serving to- the new expansion to the museum. day are taking the typical path because women have always “The first temporary exhibit to be displayed in the new space examines the served in the military, from the earliest conflicts (American history of women in the Army Chaplain Corps,” said Francoise Bonnell, AWM act- Revolutionary War) to the latest in Afghanistan and Iraq. ing director. “It highlights their challenges and contributions in providing for “We are individuals who choose to serve our country, not the spiritual needs of Army Soldiers. It uses original photographs and archival because we’re women, but because we can,” she said. dod authorizes non-chargeable recuperation leaVe for iraQ and afghanistan By Jim Garamone and the combatant commander must recommend Inability to take leave upon returning from a American Forces Press Service it through the Joint Staff for approval by the under- deployment is a problem. The services want their secretary of defense for personnel and readiness, people to take leave so they can decompress and Retherford said. reintegrate with the families and communities. The WASHINGTON -- Some deployed ser- To qualify for the program, members must be services have been allowing administrative leave vicemembers will not be charged for serving in a leave restricted area, where no depen- upon redeployment from a combat zone, but gen- rest and recuperation leave under a dents are allowed. They must be receiving hostile- erally limit it to local areas around bases. new Defense Department policy. fire pay and in areas where travel in and out of Servicemembers already in Iraq and Afghani- The new policy allows service- the country is restricted. “Two additional areas are stan who qualify to participate in the R&R program members in designated areas to go that the duty has to be extremely arduous and the will qualify for the nonchargeable R&R program. on rest and recuperation leave with- command has to foresee continuing combat op- The areas that qualify for the program have to be out charge to their leave accounts. erations,” Retherford said. redesignated every two years. “So in a sense, it is an administrative The benefit will take effect once an area is The commander of U.S. Central Command re- absence and that’s up to 15 days,” designated by the undersecretary of defense for quested that Iraq and Afghanistan be designated said Sam Retherford, the Defense personnel and readiness and will not apply retro- as nonchargeable rest and recuperation areas, Department’s director of officer and actively. Retherford said. “We quickly coordinated this re- enlisted personnel management. The Army identified the need as especially im- quest with the military departments to ensure we In the past, the leave was charged portant for junior members, Retherford said, be- provided servicemembers with this new benefit as to servicemembers’accounts, though cause they typically do not have a large amount quickly as possible,” he added. travel time from the theater to the of leave accumulated. “At the end of their deploy- About 1 million servicemembers have partici- airport closest to their destinations ment, there is very little in their leave accounts for pated in Centcom’s rest and recuperation program. was not charged, Retherford said. rest, recuperation and reintegration to the family Due to the requirement for combat operations in The nonchargeable rest and re- and community,” he said. “So this program means a presidentially designated combat zone, the non- cuperation leave program will be they will not be charged for the R&R leave, and chargeable rest and recuperation program should limited to the “most arduous” areas, they will have that leave upon redeployment.” be limited to U.S. Central Command, officials said. 12 •
    • ARMY NEWS resilience school to open in april: tradoc releases new warrior tasKs and battle drills fort JacKson at forefront of army’s new By Lisa Alley mental fitness program TRADOC Public Affairs By Susanne Kappler Fort Jackson Leader U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command released the Army’s new Warrior Tasks and Battle Drills, and FORT JACKSON, S.C. -- When Staff Sgt. the Critical Individual Supporting Task List elaborat- Keith Allen, an instructor at Victory Uni- ing on those tasks and battle drills, March 25. versity, was selected to participate in A PDF document with the new information can the Master Resilience Training pilot pro- be downloaded from the “What’s Hot” list on the Army Training Network homepage. gram at the University of Pennsylvania The information is accessed using one’s Army in August, he was skeptical, at best. Knowledge Online (AKO) password or Common Ac- “I honestly had no idea what to ex- cess Card (CAC) login. pect. All I knew was I was going to some- The last major overhaul of the tasks and battle thing that had to do with the University drills was 2005, although the number of tasks and of Pennsylvania and the psychology department,” Allen said. “I got up there, and on the first drills has evolved in response to lessons-learned couple of days, my battle buddies and I thought, ‘There’s absolutely nothing they can do to from the battlefields of Iraq and Afghanistan. help us. We’re hard-charging NCOs (noncommissioned officers). We’re infantrymen. We’re “We now have a list which has been unanimously former drill sergeants. What do I need in terms of psychology?’” approved by all Army commands universally,” said Lt. Gen. Mark Hertling, TRADOC’s deputy commanding Allen said his attitude quickly changed once he understood how resilience training general for Initial Military Training (IMT). “Some of old worked and what kind of an impact it could have. tasks and drills introduced in basic training were not “I recognized that there is some value in this,” he said. “And I can see the practical appli- relevant - they were not things most Soldiers would cation across the spectrum. I can see it at home. I can see it at work in the garrison environ- use at any point in their careers. They’d see it one ment. I can see it in combat. So, I guess, I got sold.” time and then never see it again.” More than 600 Soldiers have been trained in master resilience to date; either at UP- The old tasks and drills list were organized under enn or via video teleconference. Master resilience trainers are one of the four pillars of the headings such as “shoot,” “communicate,” “urban op- Army’s Comprehensive Soldier Fitness Program, the Army’s long-term effort to improve erations,” and “move and fight,” and contained rough- emotional, social, family and spiritual strength in Soldiers. ly 32 tasks, 207 subtasks and 12 battle drills. The new list is streamlined, with 15 tasks, 76 The program, which was initiated in October 2008, is rapidly growing and will mark a subtasks and four battle drills, organized under the milestone with the opening of the Master Resilience Training school at Fort Jackson, April headings “shoot,” “move,” “communicate,” and “sur- 5. vive and adapt.” “Fort Jackson will be at the cutting edge of the resiliency (program), and building and continuing resilience in the Army,” said Col. Darryl Williams, deputy director of Comprehen- sive Soldier Fitness. “I think we will be able to double our capacity ... and produce master resilience trainers quicker and get them out where they’re needed on the front lines.” About 750 students are scheduled to take the 10-day course this fiscal year before the school will reach its full capacity of 1,800 in fiscal year 2011. The curriculum will consist of three phases. During the first eight days, students will learn resilience fundamentals based on UPenn’s principles of positive psychology. That phase is followed by instruction on sustainment, which is comparable to the former Battlemind training. At the end of the course, students will receive one day of enhancement training, which teaches them how to maximize their performance. Fort Jackson also plays a role in the administration of the Global Assessment Tool. The GAT is an online tool that assesses a Soldier’s emotional, social, family and spiritual strength. So far, more than 300,000 Soldiers have taken the GAT, which must be completed by May 31. The other two elements of the Comprehensive Soldier Fitness program - beside the GAT and the MRT course - are online self development modules, which are tailored to a person’s performance levels on the GAT, and institutional military resilience training. Williams said that the Comprehensive Soldier Fitness program will have benefits for the entire Army. “We’ll have Soldiers and civilians and family members who will be able to better deal with adversity, will be able to communicate better with their loved ones, will be able to instill resiliency in the folks they’re charged with and will just be better. We will be a better fighting force by be- ing a more resilient Army.” Despite his initial skepticism, Allen said he is now convinced that the program will be successful. He said he advises Soldiers selected for the MRT course to have an open mind. “I am an infantry Soldier, so I had a lot of reluctance to do the program,” he said. “I know that people can overcome their reluctance. The program will sneak in and people will find out that it works. If it weren’t worthwhile, I wouldn’t be involved in it myself. I guess I’m a personal believer.” FEB/MAR 2010 • 13