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  • Introduce myselfWhy Kindergarten is separate
  • Key Points:Some lesson types repeat across grades and are critical. A cornerstone of all lesson types is the basic code. Will be taught approximately 40 times in kindergarten, less in first grade. Only in review in second grade, but it has many critical parts that become the basis for alter lesson types. Want to review it.You saw this in May or over this past year, but we want to look at it from the lens of “what are the critical parts and how did we use the lesson?”
  • Key Points:A basic code lesson is dedicated to a single sound and will usually contain the following elements:(Warm-up/review)Introduction of Sound (orally)Oral Language ExercisesTeacher ModelingWorksheet (Additional reading and writing activities)
  • Key Points:Review previously taught tricky words from first grade units 1–3.New tricky word lessons start in unit 4.
  • Key Points:Starts end of unit 3–unit 4.Tricky spelling is when a spelling can be sounded different ways: snow vs. how.

beginning K beginning K Presentation Transcript

  • D I G G I N G D E E P E R SKILLS STRAND-- KINDERGARTEN
  • AGENDA • 1. Burning Questions • 2. Review of lesson types • 3. Lesson Models (videos) • 4. Practice—Role Play • 5. E-Learning • 6. Data Analysis • 7. Action Plan
  • BURNING QUESTIONS Open to Questions…
  • ©2013 Core Knowledge Foundation. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ Lesson Types EngageNY.org 4
  • ©2013 Core Knowledge Foundation. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ The Basic Code Lesson The purpose of this lesson type is to teach students to hear a particular sound, and to write a picture of that sound using the most common (or least ambiguous) spelling for the sound. EngageNY.org 5
  • ©2013 Core Knowledge Foundation. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ The Basic Code Lesson A basic code lesson is dedicated to a single sound and will usually contain the following elements: (Warm-up/review) Introduction of Sound (orally) Oral Language Exercises Teacher Modeling Worksheet (Additional reading and writing activities) EngageNY.org 6
  • ©2013 Core Knowledge Foundation. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ Not a Smorgasbord • The Basic Code Lesson is not meant to be done in bits and pieces, or selectively. • It has a sequence, with one part leaning on the previous part. • It will be less effective if subdivided. • Same is true of other lessons. • Please try to do all the exercises, but with fewer examples if necessary. EngageNY.org 7
  • ©2013 Core Knowledge Foundation. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ Warm Up Key Instructional Techniques • This is an oral task, no letters. • There are very specific gestures used for blending 3, 4, 5 syllable words. These should be taught explicitly. • Very specific examples are used. EngageNY.org 8
  • ©2013 Core Knowledge Foundation. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ Introducing the Sound Key Instructional Techniques • This is an oral task, no letters. • A focus on articulation is explicitly taught as a technique to support learning of the sound. EngageNY.org 9
  • ©2013 Core Knowledge Foundation. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ Introducing the Spelling Key Instructional Techniques • What are the key ways the teacher interacts with the materials (organization, technique s, non verbal modeling)? • What are the key ways the teacher interacts with the students to support learning? EngageNY.org 10
  • ©2013 Core Knowledge Foundation. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ Your Turn • Examine the Basic Code checklist • Watch the Basic Code demonstration  Note specific behaviors that are evidence of the checklist items  Consider as a table: Are there additional behaviors that are done that you feel are „critical‟ to a high quality/high fidelity lesson? What are these? EngageNY.org 11
  • ©2013 Core Knowledge Foundation. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ Differentiation • Ideas for differentiating the whole group code lessons??? • Number of examples • Repetition • Level of explicitness • Additional visuals • Level of engagement EngageNY.org 12
  • ©2013 Core Knowledge Foundation. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ TRICKY WORD LESSON EngageNY.org 13
  • ©2013 Core Knowledge Foundation. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ The Tricky Word Lesson The purpose of this lesson type is to introduce a word that is needed for instruction but contains spellings that have not yet been taught. EngageNY.org 14
  • ©2013 Core Knowledge Foundation. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ Sight Words • Sight word is an ambiguous term; it can mean two things: 1. A high frequency word students need to see a lot and learn to recognize speedily. 2. A word that does not “play by the rules”—that is not spelled or pronounced as you would expect. EngageNY.org 15
  • ©2013 Core Knowledge Foundation. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ Tricky Words High Frequency Words EngageNY.org 16
  • ©2013 Core Knowledge Foundation. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ Which Words Receive Special Attention in CKLA? • Regular high frequency words (e.g., in, on, this, at) do not require special treatment; students can read these words via blending. • High frequency words that also qualify as tricky words (e.g., I, a, of, one, was, two) do need special attention. EngageNY.org 17
  • ©2013 Core Knowledge Foundation. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ Note on Tricky Words • The trickiness of a word is relative to which spellings have been taught. • The more spelling patterns the students know, the fewer words need to be described as tricky. EngageNY.org 18
  • ©2013 Core Knowledge Foundation. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ Note on Tricky Words • Some words are taught initially as tricky words but, later on, students learn they are part of a spelling pattern. Examples: he, she, we, be, me; no & so; my & by. • Other tricky words are never absorbed into the spelling patterns. Examples: one, of, two, could. EngageNY.org 19
  • ©2013 Core Knowledge Foundation. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ Teaching Tricky Words • Most words are not 100% tricky; they have tricky parts. • Strategy: instead of teaching the whole word as something tricky that needs to be memorized as a whole, draw attention to regular parts and tricky parts within the word. (Break it down!) EngageNY.org 20
  • ©2013 Core Knowledge Foundation. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ Tricky Words Across the Grades • Tricky Word lessons  Approximately 15 lessons in kindergarten  Approximately 10 lessons in 1st grade  Approximately 11 lessons in 2nd grade EngageNY.org 21
  • ©2013 Core Knowledge Foundation. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ EngageNY.org 22
  • ©2013 Core Knowledge Foundation. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ Differentiation • Ideas for differentiating the whole group code lessons??? • Number of examples • Repetition • Level of explicitness • Additional visuals • Level of engagement EngageNY.org 23
  • ©2013 Core Knowledge Foundation. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ The Tricky Spelling Lesson The purpose of a Tricky Spelling Lesson is to explicitly call students‟ attention to a spelling that can be pronounced and read more than one way. EngageNY.org 24
  • ©2013 Core Knowledge Foundation. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ Tricky Spellings • For example, „a‟ can be pronounced as:  /a/ (cat),  /ae/ (paper),  /o/ (father), or  /ə/ (about). • Tricky spellings present a challenge when students are asked to read unfamiliar words since it is possible to sound out and pronounce a tricky spelling multiple ways. EngageNY.org 25
  • ©2013 Core Knowledge Foundation. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ Advanced Code: Tricky Spellings “A Tricky Spelling Is Like a Tug of War Between Two Sounds” EngageNY.org 26 /oe/ /ou/
  • ©2013 Core Knowledge Foundation. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ The Tricky Spelling Lesson • The teacher calls explicit attention to many examples of words in which the same spelling is pronounced different ways. • Students are taught to try each pronunciation that they have learned for a spelling until they recognize a particular pronunciation as a familiar word that makes sense in the context. • Some tricky spellings are taught in Grade 1, with many more taught in Grade 2. EngageNY.org 27
  • ©2013 Core Knowledge Foundation. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ Your Turn • E-Learning • Choose a lesson type in which you would like additional time  Read and review  Practice with Partner  Reflect and consider changes for next time  Share out EngageNY.org 28
  • ©2013 Core Knowledge Foundation. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ Planning With Data in Mind • Review Instructional Pathway • Practice with sample data set • Action Plan that applies to your classroom/school—allows for differentiation EngageNY.org 29
  • ©2013 Core Knowledge Foundation. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ EngageNY.org 30
  • ©2013 Core Knowledge Foundation. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ EngageNY.org 31
  • ©2013 Core Knowledge Foundation. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ Practice Data Set • Kindergarten data • Grouping Scenarios • Action Plan EngageNY.org 32
  • ©2013 Core Knowledge Foundation. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ What‟s Next? Key Information to Share with Colleagues Action Steps How will you know this is working? EngageNY.org 33
  • ©2013 Core Knowledge Foundation. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ •THANK YOU, THANK YOU, THANK YOU!!! EngageNY.org 34