Minimalism powerpoint full

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  • “I want it to be simple; also I want it to be non-naturalistic, non-imaginistic, and non-expressionistic.”
  • “I want it to be simple; also I want it to be non-naturalistic, non-imaginistic, and non-expressionistic.” judd
  • “I want it to be simple; also I want it to be non-naturalistic, non-imaginistic, and non-expressionistic.” judd
  • “I want it to be simple; also I want it to be non-naturalistic, non-imaginistic, and non-expressionistic.” judd
  • “I want it to be simple; also I want it to be non-naturalistic, non-imaginistic, and non-expressionistic.” judd
  • Minimalism powerpoint full

    1. 1. Minimalism Objects; and nothing more.
    2. 2. Beginnings• 1960s• Reaction to Abstract Expressionism• ReductionNight Creatures Untitled, 1969—Lee Krasner —Donald Judd
    3. 3. Philosophy• Eliminate emotions, allusions, and meanings• Create a single object• Move away from illusions and alternate perceptions• Experience reality more directlyArtists• Frank Stella • Carl Andre • Robert Morris• Donald Judd • Sol LeWitt • Dan Flavin
    4. 4. Frank Stella • Born 1936 • First minimalist • Black paintings • Portrait series • Valparaiso series • Ironic titles“My painting is based on the fact that only what can be seen isthere. It really is an object […] you can see the whole withoutconfusion […] What you see is what you see.”
    5. 5. Frank StellaBlack Paintings• Black Paint• Internally defined• Self-referential• Objects
    6. 6. Tomlinson Court Park, 1967—Frank Stella
    7. 7. Marriage of Reason and Squalor, 1959—Frank Stella
    8. 8. Nunca Pasa Nada, 1964—Frank Stella
    9. 9. THE MAIN THINGWRONGWITH PAINTINGIS THAT IT IS A RECTANGULAR PLANE PLACED FLAT AGAINST ATHE A RECTANGLE IS A SHAPEWALL.ITSELF; IT IS OBVIOUSLY THEWHOLE SHAPE; IT DETERMINES AND LIMITS THEARRANGEMENT OF WHATEVER IS ON OR INSIDE OF IT. —Donald Judd
    10. 10. Frank StellaPortrait Series, 1963• Irregular shapes• Internally defined• Self-referential• Objects Carl Andre, Sidney Guberman, Leo Castelli
    11. 11. Frank StellaValparaiso Series• Colorful Valparaiso Flesh and Green, 1963• Irregular shapes —Frank Stella• Internally defined• Self-referential• Objects Empress of India, 1965 —Frank Stella
    12. 12. Donald Judd • 1928—1994 • Most Famous • Simplicity • Boxes • Stacks • Progressions • Industrial • Specific Objects“It isn’t necessary for a work to have a lot of things to look at, tocompare, to analyze one by one, to contemplate. The thing as awhole, its quality as a whole, is what is interesting. The main thingsare alone and are more intense, clear and powerful.”
    13. 13. real materialsexisting in realspace, 1968—Donald Judd
    14. 14. Large Stack, 1968—Donald Judd
    15. 15. Untitled, 1970—Donald Judd
    16. 16. Untitled (Progression), 1976—Donald Judd
    17. 17. Untitled (Progression), 1974—Donald Judd
    18. 18. Untitled (Progression), 1974G—Donald Judd
    19. 19. Carl Andre • Born 1935 • Close friend with Frank Stella • Influenced by “constructivist” technique and works by Ezra Pound among other pieces of literature“Art excludes the unnecessary.[…] I’m not interested inexpression or sensitivity.”
    20. 20. Essay on Sculpture, 1964 Map of Poetry, 1966—Carl Andre —Carl Andre
    21. 21. •Before Carl Andre moved to sculpture, he was working with literature and philosophy •Andre was influenced by the works of Ezra pound •These poems came in the transition between literature and sculpture •The “poems” are similar to minimalist sculpture in that the content is notPoem, 1966 important, while the—Carl Andre physical structure is
    22. 22. Carl AndreAndre worked with three types ofminimalist sculpture in his career:1. Sculpture as form2. Sculpture as structure3. Sculpture as place
    23. 23. Sculpture as Form •Pieces usually consisted of wooden blocks •Always comprised of geometric shapes •Stand vertical •No complex shapesTimber Piece (Well), 1962—Carl Andre
    24. 24. The Way North, East, South, West, 1975—Carl Andre
    25. 25. Sculpture as Structure •Stacked units •More complex shapes •Usually stand verticalCedar Piece, 1959—Carl Andre
    26. 26. Still Blue Range, 1989—Carl Andre
    27. 27. Sculpture as Place •Less rigid characteristics than the other types of sculpture •Pieces spread across the ground •No definite size, shape, or material used •The piece of art defines the space that it occupiesCopper Ribbon, 1969—Carl Andre
    28. 28. Untitled, 1972—Carl Andre
    29. 29. Sol LeWitt • 1928—2007 • Minimalist and Conceptualist • Repetitive forms • Modular forms • Seriality“The use of serial ideas became my vocabulary, which by usingbasic forms made a process of ideas.”
    30. 30. Floor Structure, Black, 1965—Sol LeWitt
    31. 31. K 1 2 3 4 5 6 #2, 1997—Sol LeWitt
    32. 32. Progressive Structure, 1997—Sol LeWitt
    33. 33. Modular Cube/Base, 1968—Sol LeWitt
    34. 34. Robert Morris • Born 1931 • Minimalist and Conceptualist • Outdoor art • Viewer involvement“Simplicity of shape doesnot necessarily equate tosimplicity of experience.”
    35. 35. Wedges, 1970—Robert Morris
    36. 36. Bodyspacemotionthings, 1970—Robert Morris
    37. 37. Instillation, 1964—Robert Morris
    38. 38. Dan Flavin • 1933—1996 • Fluorescent lights • Wanted viewers to experience his art • Influenced by lighting at churches • Started with abstract expressionism • First experimented with found objects“It is what it is, and it aintnothin else... Everything isclearly, openly, plainlydelivered.”
    39. 39. Untitled (Corner Piece), 1969—Dan Flavin
    40. 40. Untitled, 1970—Dan Flavin
    41. 41. The diagonal of May 25, 1963, 1963—Dan Flavin
    42. 42. Untitled (site specific installation), 1969—Dan Flavin
    43. 43. Fluorescent light time lapsehttp://flavin.pulitzerarts.org/#/installations/1/
    44. 44. Blue Intensity, 1968—Dan Flavin
    45. 45. Criticism• Not the work of the artists• No skill• No meaning• Not beautiful• Not creative Equivalent VIII, 1966 —Carl Andre
    46. 46. Minimalism• Eliminate the unnecessary• Create a single object• Experience reality in the most direct way“Everything is still. Everything is repeated. Everything isobvious. The accumulation of facts collapses perception.The indicated sum of these simple series is irreduciblecomplexity. And impenetrable chaos. They astound.” —Mel Bochner

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