Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
  • Like
Phy edu-ss-08
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Now you can save presentations on your phone or tablet

Available for both IPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Phy edu-ss-08

  • 4,351 views
Published

phy-edu-ss-08.pdf

phy-edu-ss-08.pdf

Published in Education
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
4,351
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
21
Comments
0
Likes
2

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. DEPARTMENT OFPHYSICAL EDUCATION & SPORTS SCIENCES (University of Delhi)1. PROFILE OF THE DEPARTMENTThe Department of Physical Education And Sports Sciences is functioning under theFaculty of Inter-disciplinary and Applied Sciences, University of Delhi.1.1 Location and ContactsAt present, the department is functioning from the Indira Gandhi Institute ofPhysical Education and Sports Sciences, B-Block Vikas Puri, New Delhi-110018.Head of the Department - Dr. (Mrs.) Kiran SandhuTelephone - 011 9818022788Email - kiran_sandhu36@yahoo.co.in1.2 Staff – Teaching and Non-TeachingSTAFFRECOGNIZED READERS OF UNIVERSITY1. Dr. Kiran Sandhu2. Dr. D. K. Kansal3. Dr. M. K. SinghNON-TEACHING STAFFName Designation Nature of dutyMs. Kiran Chaudhary Computer operator-Cum Handling all correspondence, students dealing Office Steno and other daily needs of the officeSh. Ishwar Parkash Office Attendant Office Support, Dak Delivery, etc1.3 Students AdmittedSTUDENTS ADMISSION: Ph.D, M.P.Ed, B.P.EdADMISSION FORMSAdmission to the Ph.D programme is processed through the Departmental Research Committee theform/s are available at the web site and are as Appendix-IAdmission to the M.P.Ed, B.P.Ed, course of study is processed through the admission committeeappointed for the purpose. Admission form/s are available at the web site and are as Appendix-ii & iii.Admission to under graduate courses of study is processed through the admission committeeappointed for the purpose by the respective colleges. For Admission form/s and details contact theCollege i.e. Indira Gandhi Institute of Physical Education & Sports Sciences 1
  • 2. NO. OF STUDENTS WHO APPLIED & GOT ADMISSION IN POST-GRADUATE AND RESEARCH DEGREESYear *U.G. - B.P.Ed. *P.G. - M.P.Ed. M.Phil. Ph.D. (One Year Degree (Two Year Degree N/A Since July, 2007 after Graduation) after Graduation) Applied Admitted Applied Admitted Applied/ Applied Admitted Under- Admitted Process2004-05 183 48 170 26 it is likely - to start2005-06 240 47 205 25 - in 20092006-07 207 50 167 29 -2007-08 187 50 197 25 **24 11 Nil *The admission conducted by the Department on self financed basis, but, courses studied at college (IGIPESS) ** The candidates studying under the Department. 2. PROGRAMMES OF STUDY 2.1 Doctorate of Philosophy in Physical Education (Ph.D.) 2.1.1 Profile of Research, Scholar and Supervisor Following candidates has been registered for Ph.D Programme in Department of Physical Education & Sports Sciences of University of Delhi. 2
  • 3. S.No Profile of Study Keywords Scholar Profile Profile of Supervisor 1. ‘A Study on Public Commonwealth Mr. Ajit, Dr (Mrs.) Kiran Sandhu (Ph.D) Head, Department of Physical Education Perception of the Games 2010, Proficient in English, and Sports Sciences, University of Delhi is a Former International Commonwealth Games Public Perception, football, yoga, worked Basketball player recipient of Shakti Pushkar Award for being best sports 2010’ New Delhi, as a PGT (physical women (1980) Captained Indian Basketball Women team 1980 at IX ABC, Questionnaire/Su education) , have Hongkong. Teaching Professional Preparation of Curriculum Design, rvey Study, publication at credit Research, and basketball. Author of award winning book Sports Dynamics Sample Group-Six other Book Published “Professional Preparation and CareerDevelopment in and participated in Physical Education; Trenda And Development in Professional Preparation national/international conferences in Physical Education”. Guiding Ph.D and M.Phil; Developed Curriculum for Application 7 Descipline Course in Physical Education for University of Delhi; NCERT, and CBSE. Also author of several research papers and books, resource person for U.G.C. Refresher courses, winner of Bursery Award of Association of Commonwealth universities (2003), project grant of UNESCO chair (1998), IGNOU and British council New Delhi (2005). 2. ‘Effect of Selected Yoga, Mr. Kunal, Dr. Narinder Paul Sharma (Ph.D) Reader Outstanding National Football Yogic Exercise on Psychology, National player Player member of Research Development committee LNIPE and Subject Psychological and physiology, New volleyball and athletics, Expert in various committees Different Universities. Only expert having Physiological Variables Delhi attended various maximum Number of Books Physical Education and other related areas to of Delhi Secondary National seminars his credit. Presented research papers in various International and National School Male Students’ Conferences. Resource person for U.G.C. Refresher courses. Evaluating and guiding Ph.D and M.Phill education and physical education candidates. Teaching sports psychology, research & football. 3. ‘Construction and Goal Setting Ms. Meenakshi, Dr .Lalit Sharma (Ph.D) Reader Outstanding Gymnastics Organizer, Validation of Goal questionnaire, Member of various Physical Education Associations. Attended various National Player Kho- National and International level Conferences. Author of various books: Setting Questionnaire 400 subjects Kho, Athletics, Have attribution in Physical Education and several other books. Teaching: in Sports’ (Male& female), participated in Aged 17 years Sports Psychology and Gymnastics. International & National and above, factor Seminars analysis, scientific authentication. 4. ‘Construction and Fitness Test Mr. Sandeep Kumar, Dr. Sandeep Tiwari (Ph.D) Reader Outstanding Volleyball Player, member Standardization of Construction, 300 Worked as lecturer at of various National organizations (Phy.Edu&volleyball) attended Several Specific Physical Male Cricketers Meerut University, International and National Conference. Published number of research Fitness Test in Cricket’ aged 20-25, teach sports training papers. Qualified volleyball Referee, Teaching sports Training and Speed, Strength, and cricket, fitness volleyball. Published various books guiding Ph.D & M.Phil Candidates. Endurance, 3
  • 4. S.No Profile of Study Keywords Scholar Profile Profile of Supervisor Flexibility and Co- expert Have ordination, Factor participated in national analysis, scientific seminars. authentication 5. ‘A Demographic Study Mr. Pawan Kumar Dr. Dhananjoy Shaw Dabas (Ph.D) Reader on Autonomic Function of Retired Sports Outstanding Judo Player. Recipient of Best Scientist Award (Research Person of Selected Paper) Member of various National & international organization and Games and Sports Associations. Author of Several books and Research papers. Acted as Predominated by Resource person for various National level Programmes/Courses/workshops. Guiding Ph. D. Candidates Teaching Power and Aerobic Biomechanics Research kinesiology and judo. Capacity’ 6. ‘Promotion of Long-Term Plan, Mr. Surender Kumar Dr (Mrs.) Kiran Sandhu (Ph.D) Head, Department of Physical Education Taekwondo in India: and Korean Bhandoria, and Sports Sciences, University of Delhi is a Former International An Appraisal and Sports promotion Proficient in English, Basketball player recipient of Shakti Pushkar Award for being best sports Development of as a benchmark women (1980) Captained Indian Basketball Women team 1980 at IX ABC, Teakwondo/ Judo, Framework of a Long- for developing a Hongkong. Teaching Professional Preparation of Curriculum Design, worked as a physical Term Plan’ module for education teacher in Research, and basketball. Author of award winning book Sports Dynamics promotion of Delhi administration other Book Published “Professional Preparation and CareerDevelopment in Taekwondo in and an International Physical Education; Trenda And Development in Professional Preparation India, referee, Executive in Physical Education”. Guiding Ph.D and M.Phil; Developed Curriculum Questionnaire/Su for Application 7 Descipline Course in Physical Education for University of Committee member rvey Study Delhi; NCERT, and CBSE. Also author of several research papers and and liaison officer in Taekwondo federation books, resource person for U.G.C. Refresher courses, winner of Bursery of India, have Award of Association of Commonwealth universities (2003), project grant publication at credit of UNESCO chair (1998), IGNOU and British council New Delhi (2005). and participated in national/international conferences 7. ‘A Study on the Effect Ms. Sonia Shalini, Dr. Dhananjoy Shaw (Ph.D) Reader of Step Aerobic Expert in fitness, Training on Selected Outstanding Judo Player. Recipient of Best Scientist Award (Research worked as a lecturer Paper) Member of various National & international organization and Ground Reaction Force (physical education)in Associations. Author of Several books and Research papers. Acted as Variables of Female’ IGIPESS, have Resource person for various National level 4
  • 5. S.No Profile of Study Keywords Scholar Profile Profile of Supervisor publication at credit Programmes/Courses/workshops. guiding Ph. D. Candidates Teaching and participated in Biomechanics Research kinesiology and judo. national/international conferences 8. ‘A Critical Appraisal of Mr. Vishnu Parmar Dr. D.K. Kansal Status of Physical (Ph.D.) Principal Education and Yoga in Has conducted research and published extensively on talent selection and colleges and sports potentials of children and champion sportsmen, is the author of a Universities of text book on measurement and evaluation in physical education & sports, Rajasthan’ first awardee of a Fulbright scholarship in physical education for conducting research at the Department of Physical Education of the University of Illinois, Chicago (USA) on the measurements of Olympic athletes. Founder Head of the first Indian University Department of Sports Sciences at Punjabi University, Patiala has an experience of 33 years of teaching & research in sports science. President & Organising Secretary of National Associations in Physical Education and Sports Sciences, Chaired Olympic Science Congress session and other inter national conference sessions abroad, awarded Spardhashree Award 1996, World 2000 Millennium Award, Bharat Jyoti Award 2001, Lifetime Achievement Award 2004 included in Asian/American whos who publication, 2005, has guided and evaluated many Ph. D. research projects independently. 9. ‘A Critical Appraisal of Mr. Piyush Kumar Jain Dr. M.K. Singh Professional Degree (Ph.D.) Reader Courses and Outstanding Badminton player Attended various National and Infrastructure of International Conferences Member of Various national committees, Colleges and University Author of Several Books and Research papers. Teaching Sports Medicine, Departments of Research and Badminton. Recipient of Best Sports Women. Resource Physical Education person for U.G.C. Refresher courses Guiding Ph. D. Candidates. Member Approved by the NCTE of Various inspection Committees of different organizations. in the State of Uttar Pradesh’.10. ‘A Study of Critical Ms. Asha Rana Dr. D.K. Kansal Analysis of Sports Participation and (Ph.D.) Principal Physical Education Has conducted research and published extensively on talent selection and Courses Conducted in sports potentials of children and champion sportsmen, is the author of a 5
  • 6. S.No Profile of Study Keywords Scholar Profile Profile of Supervisor the Universities of text book on measurement and evaluation in physical education & sports, India’ first awardee of a Fulbright scholarship in physical education for conducting research at the Department of Physical Education of the University of Illinois, Chicago (USA) on the measurements of Olympic athletes. Founder Head of the first Indian University Department of Sports Sciences at Punjabi University, Patiala has an experience of 33 years of teaching & research in sports science. President & Organizing Secretary of National Associations in Physical Education and Sports Sciences, Chaired Olympic Science Congress session and other inter national conference sessions abroad, awarded Spardhashree Award 1996, World 2000 Millennium Award, Bharat Jyoti Award 2001, Lifetime Achievement Award 2004 included in Asian/American whos who publication, 2005, has guided and evaluated many Ph. D. research projects independently.11. ‘A Study on the Ms. Neeru Yadav Dr. Dhananjoy Shaw Validation of Cooper’s (Ph.D) Reader Twelve Minute Run Outstanding Judo Player. Recipient of Best Scientist Award (Research and Walk Test for Paper) Member of various National & international organization and Selected Male Associations. Author of Several books and Research papers. Acted as Populations of NCT- Resource person for various National level Delhi’ Programmes/Courses/workshops. Guiding Ph. D. Candidates Teaching Biomechanics Research kinesiology and judo. 6
  • 7. ORDINANCES FOR MASTER OF PHILOSOPHY IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION2.2 Masters of Philosophy in Physical Education (M.Phil.)GENERAL RULES:1. There shall be an M. Phil. Degree Programme in Department of Physical Education and Sports Sciences.2. The programme may be run on a full time basis and on a part time basis, depending upon the facilities in the Department to run the programme.3. Subject to the over-all control of the Academic Council, the M. Phil. Programme in Physical Education will be administered by an M. Phil. Committee consisting of the Head of the Department, all Professors, Readers (in the absence of Professors) and other teachers teaching (in absence of Readers) Physical education for ten years at the Master’s Level in the Department and such teachers (including teachers from other Departments of the faci;tu concerned wherever necessary) recommended by the Dean of the faculty, on the advice of the Head of the Department, and approved by the Vice-Chancellor. However, the total membership of the Committee shall not exceed fifteen (15) in order of seniority. The Head of the Department shall be the Chairman of the Committee. Members of the M. Phil. Committee other than the Head of the Department and Professors in the Department shall hold office for a period of two years. After the M. Phil. Committee is once constituted and a person, who is not already a member of the M. Phil. Committee is appointed as Professor, such a person will automatically become a member of the M. Phil. Committee, the maximum limit of 15 of the membership of the Committee shall not apply till such time M. Phil. Committee is reconstituted. This Committee shall: a. Invite and scrutinize applications and make admission to the M. Phil. Programme (The committee may scrutinize applications to eliminate ineligible candidates and to draw up, if necessary short list of applicants to be called for a personal interview). b. Design courses and lay down syllabi for the same. (The M. Phil. Committee of the Department will give due consideration to the suggestions made by the teachers of the Department while designing the courses and laying down the syllabi for the same. c. Approve and announce Seminar Courses to be offered each year. d. Organize Lectures, Seminars and Supervision of the dissertation work etc. e. Make arrangements for the conduct of oral/written examinations, evaluation of performance in day to day work, including tests, seminars, viva-voce etc. f. Recommend persons for appointment as internal/external examiners for consideration by the Academic Council. g. Review from time to time the working of the M. Phil. Programme and recommend any necessary modifications in its scope, structure, etc.4. The duration of the programme for full-time stpudents shall ordinarily be one calender year extendable by six months for dissertation work. The duration of the programme in respect of part- time students shall ordinarily be two calender years extendable by six months for dissertation work. Variations in the duration of the programme may be allowed by the Academic Council on the recommendations of the M. Phil. Committee of the Department.5. Eligibility for Admission to the M. Phil. in Physical Education: 5 .1 Eligibility conditions for full time candidates: The minimum qualifications for admission to the M. Phil. (full-time) programme shall be a Master’s Degree of an Indian University or an equivalent degree of a foreign University, in Physical Education with a high second class i.e., minimum of 55% marks in the aggregate or an equivalent grade. Provided that the above minimum marks requirement shall not apply in the case of the teachers of the University of Delhi holding substantive appointment before the promulgation of this Ordinance. 5.2 Eligibility Conditions for Part-time Candidates: 1. The minimum qualification for admission to the M. Phil. (Part-time) programme shall be Master’s Degree of an Indian University or an equivalent degree of a foreign University, in
  • 8. Physical Education with a high second class i.e. minimum of 55% marks in the aggregate or an equivalent grade. 2. Preference will be given to candidates having experience of working as Physical Educationists, coaches, Fitness Trainer and other related fields.6. Admission Test: Candidates who fulfill the minimum eligibility requirements will be called to appear in the Written Entrance Test. The final selection of the candidates will be based on the Written Test and Interview.7. Reservation of Seats for Scheduled Caste and Scheduled Tribes Candidates: 7.1 Candidates belonging to the S.C./S.T. category seeking admission to the M. Phil. Programme will also be required to get their names registered along with other candidates. The Registration form duly filled in and accompanied by all relevant certificates shall be submitted at the Registration Centre with in the registration dates. The original certificate will be returned to the candidates after verification and stamping on the reverse and the attested copies there of will be retained. 7.2 That 15% of the seats for S.C. and 7% for S.T. (Inter-changeable) be reserved as per Government of India instructions. 7.3 Where the admission is based on screening/written test, for M. Phil. programme, the SC/ST candidates would also be required to appear for the same but their merit list will be drawn separately and operated as per the reservation quota. 7.4 If the requisite number of SC/ST candidates are not available by the last date fixed by the University for admission to each course, the remaining seats will be de-reserved and filled from general category.8. Reservation of seats of the Children/widows of the officers and men of the armed forces including paramilitary personal killed or disabled in action in wars from 1947-48 onwards. 8.1 Children/widows/wives of the officers and men of the Armed Forces including Para military personal killed or disabled in action or those who died/were disabled on duty and seeking admission will be required to get their name registered with in the prescribed dates along with other candidates. 8.2 5% of the total number of seats will be reserved for the children/widows/wives of officers and men of armed forces including paramilitary personnel. 8.3 This concession is also extended to the Children of those disabled officers and men of the armed forces including paramilitary personnel who are invalidated out of service during the hostilities and who were unmarried at the time of disablement from service but subsequently got married and had their children. 8.4 In order to become eligible for above concession, children/widows of officers and Jawans etc. are required to produce the entitlement card issued by the following:- 8.4.1 Secretary, Kendriya Sainik Board, Delhi. 8.4.2 Secretary, Rajya/Zila Sainik Board 8.4.3 Officer-in-Charge, Record Officer 8.4.4 1st Class Stipendiary Magistrate. 8.5 Relaxation to the extent of 5% in the minimum marks in the aggregate will be given to the candidates of the above mentioned categories (Clause 7 &8) while determining their eligibility to the M. Phil. course concerned.9. Attendance: Students shall be required to attend Lectures and participate in seminars arranged in the Department during the programme. The minimum percentage of lectures to be attended and seminars to be participated by the students shall be determined by the M. Phil. Committee of the Department. But, in no case minimum requirement to be prescribed in by Department, shall be less than 2/3 of the lectures delivered and seminars held, separately. The M. Phil. Committee of the Department will also constitute for each student an Advisory Committee of 3 to 5 members including the supervisors of the candidate. The Advisory Committee, which may also include members from other departments, or from other universities if the nature of the study demands, will advise the student in his studies, seminar work, and dissertation work etc.10. Examination: 8
  • 9. 10.1 The M. Phil. Examination shall be held by the M. Phil. Committee in two parts as follows: PART-I (a) : Student will be required to opt for one Theory paper enlisted in Annexure-I (A). PART-I (b) : Student will be required to opt for two Theory papers enlisted in Annexure-I(B). PART-II : After passing the examination in the Theory papers, a student shall be required to write a dissertation on a subject approved by the M. Phil. Research Advisory Committee under the supervision of the Supervisor/s appointed for the purpose. 10.2 The dissertation will be submitted only when the Supervisor/s concerned is/are satisfied that the Dissertation is worthy of consideration in part fulfillment of the M. Phil. degree. Provided that the application for submission of Dissertation shall also be countersigned by the Head of the Department concerned. The Dissertation may include results of original research, a fresh interpretation of existing facts and data or a review article of a critical nature or may take such other form as may be determined by the Advisory Committee. 10.3 Provided that a student who has secured 50% marks in two courses from Part-I (a) & Part-I (b) (Separately in theory & practical) of the Part-I examination may be allowed to proceed for his dissertation work. Such a student shall be permitted to submit his dissertation only when he has passed the examination in all the courses prescribed in Part-I (a) & Part-I (b) (Clause 19 (i). In the case of students who have not cleared all the courses at the examination as prescribed in Part-I (A) & I(B), the M. Phil. Committee will arrange a special examination in the remaining courses at a suitable stage of the programme. 10.4 The dissertation should be submitted by the date fixed by the M. Phil. Committee of the Department in each case. Where a dissertation is submitted beyond six months in the ordinary course, the same shall be treated and entertained in relation to the next year’s examination, and the student concerned shall be required to fulfill all the formalities including enrolment as ex-student and filling up a fresh examination form for this purpose. 10.5 The maximum marks for each course pand the pattern and duration of the examination in each course shall be determined by the M. Phil. Committee of the Department in each case. Weightage may be given by the M. Phil. Committee of the Department in the final evaluation of the candidate to internal assessment based on his performance in the periodical tests and seminars In no case shall the weightage exceed 50% of the total marks of the M. Phil. Examination. 1. The evaluation of candidates both in respect of courses and the dissertation to be submitted by the shall be done numerically. The maximum marks required to pass the M. Phil. Examination shall be 50% marks in the aggregate of written courses, 50% marks in the aggregate of practical courses and 50% marks in the Project Report/Dissertation including Viva-voce, separately. The successful candidates of the M. Phil. Examination shall be classified as follows: 11.1 1st Div. with Distinction : 75% marks in aggregate or above st 11.2 1 Div. : 60% marks in the aggregate or above but below 75% marks 11.3 Pass : All others 12. No student shall be allowed to appear in any part of the Examination more than twice and a student must clear the M. Phil. Examination with in three years of his initial registration for the M. Phil. full-time programme and with in four years of his initial registration for M. Phil. Part-time programme. A candidate who having fulfilled the attendance requirements etc. and being otherwise eligible to appear at the examination fails or fails to appear at the same he/she shall be required to appear/re-appear at the same on his being enrolled as an ex-student in accordance with the rules prescribed in this behalf. Appendix- I (A)2.2.1 COURSE OF STUDYAny one of the Following Papers is to be opted by each student from Part-I (A) :A.-1 : Growth and Normative Research Methods in Physical EducationA.-2 : Descriptive Research Method in Physical Education 9
  • 10. A.-3 : Experimental and Ex-post Facto Research Design in Physical EducationA.-4 : Historical and Documentation Research Methods in Physical Education 10
  • 11. PAPER A-1: GROWTH AND NORMATIVE RESEARCH METHODS IN PHYSICAL EDUCATIONMax. Marks = 100 Time = 3 Hrs.Unit-I Steps in Research: Selection of Problem, Examining Assumptions, Review of Literature, Anticipating the Outcome of Inquiry, Source of Data, Identifying Relevant Technique for Data Collection, Analysis and InterpretationUnit-II Major approaches: Normative, Functional, Dialectical, Critical Evaluative and SyncreticUnit-III Sociological Survey, Anthropological Survey, Case Study, Content Analysis, Primary and Secondary SourcesUnit-IV Longitudinal Study, Cross Sectional Study, Trends ReportUnit-V Hybrid Study of Cross-sectional and Longitudinal StudyUnit-VI An Introduction to SPSS and MicrostatUnit-VII Research Report in Growth and Normative Research Method in Physical EducationUnit-VIII Preparation of different types of Norms and ScalesUnit-IX Doctoral Research in India and Abroad in Physical EducationUnit-X Theories, Ethics and Politics of Growth and Normative Research Methods in Physical EducationPAPER A-2: DESCRIPTIVE RESEARCH METHOD IN PHYSICAL EDUCATIONMax. Marks = 100 Time = 3 Hrs.Unit-I Steps in Research: Selection of Problem, Examining Assumptions, Review of Literature, Anticipating the Outcome of Inquiry, Source of Data, Identifying Relevant Technique for Data Collection, Analysis and InterpretationUnit-II Nature and Scope of Exploratory and Descriptive Research Criteria: Areas and LevelsUnit-III Construction of Theoretical Frame Work, Formulation of Research Design, Survey Studies, Sociological Survey, School Survey, College and University Survey, Survey at Mass Level, Survey for Particular Target groupUnit-IV An Introduction to SPSS and Microstat, also, an Introduction to Multivariate Statistics (Factor Analysis, Discriminate Analysis, Canonical Analysis, Multiple Regression Analysis)Unit-V Job and Activity Analysis, Documentary Analysis, Public Opinion Surveys, Community SurveysUnit-VI Research Report in Descriptive Research, The paradigms of Debate: An Extended Review and a Celebration of Difference.Unit-VII Studying, Planning and Conducting Interviews, The Diary Interview Method, Observation Studies. Item Analysis, Content Analysis, Projective Technique, Scaling TechniqueUnit-VIII Analysis and Presentation of Information Assessment and Evaluation of Descriptive ResearchUnit-IX Doctoral Research in Physical Education in India and World (Review and Critical Comment)Unit-X Meta Analysis and Literature Analysis, Theory, Ethics and Politics in Descriptive Research in Physical EducationPAPER A-3: EXPERIMENTAL AND EX-POST FACTO RESEARCH DESIGN IN PHYSICAL EDUCATIONMax. Marks = 100 Time = 3 Hrs.Unit-I An introduction to Ex-post Facto and Experimental Research, Laboratory Experiment and Field Experiment, Experimental and Ex-post Facto Research as Differentiated from other types of researchesUnit-II - Post Test Only Design 11
  • 12. - Pre Test and Post Test Design for Single Group - Pre Test and Post Test Design for Multi-group - Repeated Measure Design for Single group - Repeated Measure Design for Multi group - Matched Group Design for Post Test Only - Matched Group Design for Pre and Post-Test - Matched Group Design for Pre and Post Test for Multiple Group - Longitudinal Research Design - Cross Sectional Research Design - Hybrid Design of Longitudinal and Cross Sectional Design - Action Research, Applied Research and Basic ResearchUnit-III - Test Construction and Selection in Experimental Research - Relationships and Comparative Studies in Experimental Research - Control of Experimental Variables/Groups, Control Groups and Factors Affecting Experimental Outcome – Subjects, Age, Sex, Physiological, Psychological Variables etc.Unit-IV - Experimental Validity & Reliability – Design & Tools - Statistical Control in Experimental Research - Investigator and Investigation in Experimental Research - Instrumentation in Experimental ResearchUnit-V Pre true and Quasi Experimental Design, Latin, Greco-Latin and Factorial Designs (between the subjects and within the subjects). Analysis of Covariance with randomized Group DesignUnit-VI Establishing the Various Types of Experimental Research Laboratory in relation to the sports field facilities. Theory, Ethics and Politics in Research of Physical Education with special reference to Experimental ResearchUnit-VII Knowledge of SPSS and Micro Stat applicationsUnit-VIII Factor Analysis:, Principle Factor Solution. Orthogonal and Oblique Analytic Rotations, Varimax, Equimax, Promax, ANOVA, the Kruskal Walles Test, Chi-Square TestUnit-IX Multiple Correlation and Regression Technique including Discriminant Analysis, Canonical Analysis. The Freedman Test for Ordinal Data and Cochran’s Q Test for Nominal DataPractical: 1. Preparation of Various Experimental Design 2. Measuring of the Various Variables: Physical, Physiological, Biomechanical and Psychological etc. 3. Collection & Deal with Data & ScoringPAPER A-4: HISTORICAL AND DOCUMENTATION RESEARCH METHODS IN PHYSICAL EDUCATIONMax. Marks = 100 Time = 3 Hrs.Unit-I Teps in Research: Selection of Problem, Examining Assumptions, Review of Literature, Anticipating the Outcome of Inquiry, Source of Data, Identifying Relevant Technique for Data Collection, Analysis and InterpretationUnit-II What is History? Theories of History, Problem of Physical Educational HistoryUnit-III Characteristics of Historical Research, Practical Limitations of Historical Approach, the Historical Hypothesis. Sources of Historical data, Evaluating Historical DataUnit-IV An Introduction to SPSS and MicrostatUnit-V Classification of Historical Documents and Principles of Documentary Study, Validation of Documents 12
  • 13. Unit-VI Reporting of Historical and Documentation Research, Descriptive Phase, Interpretative Phase and Applications of Data to Present and Hypothesis for FutureUnit-VII Survey of Physical Educational Research and Research Activities, Sociological Survey in Physical EducationUnit-VIII Doctoral Research in Physical Education in India and Doctoral Research in Physical Education in WorldUnit-IX Analysis of Documentary Evidence, Statistical and Graphical Techniques related to Historical and Documentation ResearchUnit-X Life Histories of PET and Exploring the Meaning of Marginality, Theory, Ethics and Politics of Historical and Documentation Research in Physical Education Appendix- I (B)The student will have to opt any two of the following nine Papers:B-1 : Applied Management in SportsB-2 : Biomechanics of Exercise, Fitness, Physical Education and SportsB-3 : Applied Psychology in SportsB-4 : Scientific Basis of Sports Training & ExcellenceB-5 : Applied Sociology in SportsB-6 : Physiology of Sport and ExerciseB-7 : Curriculum Development in Physical EducationB-8 : Athletic Care & Rehabilitation (ACR)B-9 : Test, Measurement & Evaluation in Physical Education & Sports M.Phil. (Physical Education) Max. Marks: 100B-1: APPLIED MANAGEMENT IN SPORTS:Unit-I: Fundamental Concepts of Sports Management:1.1. Definition, evolution & curriculum1.2. Career considerations & avenues & professional preparation1.3. Research Theory & Practice1.4. Aims, Objectives & Principles of Sports Management1.5. Who are Sports Managers? Job Specifications, and environment.Unit-II: The World of Sports Management:2.1. International Perspective in Sports Management: Asia (China, Korea & India), Australia, Africa, America (Canada, USA), Europe (France, Hungry, Netherland, Germany, Spain)2.2. Management Approaches: Classical, Behavioural, Systems, Contingencies, Management Science.2.3. Management Styles: The Autocratic, The Bureaucratic, The Democratic & The Spectator Style.2.4. Management Information System (MIS).2.5. Media & Sports Management, Public Relations, CommunicationsUnit-III: Event Management:3.1. Basic Principles & Planning (Organizing, Directing & Evaluating)3.2. Facilities, Equipments, Personnel/Committee & Leadership, Creating & Maintaining Motivation.3.3. Promotion & Marketing (Budget Considerations & Risk Management).3.4. Applied Concepts: Evaluation & Feedback Protocol of Ceremonies, Websites, MarketingProcess, Public Relations. 13
  • 14. 3.5. Control & Security: Violent Behaviour, Crowd Management, Alcohol Policy, Medical Plan, Crisis Management & Evaluation Plan, Parking & Traffic Control.Unit-IV: Facilities & Equipment Management:4.1. Sports Facilities Equipments & Ancillaries Areas4.2. Fitness & Health Relation Areas4.3. Aquatic & Indoor Facilities4.4. Outdoor & Adventure Sports4.5. Facilities for Senior, Impaired/Challenged and Special Population.Unit-V: Fiscal Management & Applied Areas:5.1. Definition & Role of Accounting in Sports Management5.2. Fund Raising, Sponsorships, Economic Problems Areas.5.3. Budgeting: Preparation, Presentations, Revision etc.5.4.Office Management: Record, Reports, time management, conflict resolutions, decision taking shared planning Identifying weaknesses & strength.5.5. Preventing legal Issues & Hassels.REFERENCES: 1. Aggarwala Vira. Bharma (1992). Management Principles, Practices, Techniques II Edition (Deep & Deep Publications – New Delhi). 2. Chelladurai P. (1985). Sports Management Macr-Perspectives (Adelaide St., London Ontario). 3. Davis, Kathleen. A. Sports Management: Successful Private Sector Business Strategies USA: WCB Inc. 4. Goel, S.L., (1995). Modern Management Techniques (Deep & Deep Publications – New Delhi). 5. Parkhouse, Bonnie (1991). The Management of Sports: Its Foundation and Application. St. Louis: Mosby-Year Book Inc. 6. Plunkett, Richard. W. Supervision (1991) The Direction of People at Work. USA: Allyn and Bacon Inc. 7. Sandhu,Kiran (1995) Sports Dynamic: Psychology, Sociology and Management. Galgotia publication: New Delhi 8. Walker, Marcia, L. and Stortar, David K. (199). Sports Facility Management. London: Jones and Barlett Publishers M.Phil. (Physical Education)Max. Marks: 100Time – 3 Hrs. Theory – 70 Practical - 30PAPER B-2 : BIOMECHANICS OF EXERCISE, FITNESS, PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND SPORTSUNIT-I: Kinesiology of Fitness and Exercise:- • Properties of Human Tissue and adaptation (Bone, Cartilage, Muscles, Collagen and Tendor) as an effect of exercise or Physical loading. • Biomechanics of work space and Environment. • Postures and Works. • Handelling Load. • Biomechanics of Fitness and Sports Industry. • Neurophysiological basis of movements for exercise and fitness. Practical Applications and Evaluation of Biomechanical Principles:- • Principles of Initial Force. • Principles of Optimum Path of acceleration • Principles of Action and Reaction • Principles of Conservation of Angular Momentum • Principles of other Principles .UNIT-II: Electromyographic Applications: • Scope and Use 14
  • 15. • Physiological basis of EMG and Instrumentation • Recording Methods • Relation to Muscular Tension/Activation • Use of EMG to Exercise, Fitness and Sports • Bio-mechanical Measurements using EMG data Biomechanical Measurement using:- • Force Platform • Pressure Transducer • Accelerometer • Other DynamometryUNIT-III: Biomechanics of Distance Running And Locomotion. • Human Gait • Computer Simulation. • Performance Improvement. Electrogoniometry and it’s Practical Applications. • Instrumentation • Use and Scope. • Biomechanical Measurement using Elgon Data.UNIT-IV: Two and Three Dimensional Analysis of Human Movement: • Data Capture and Processing of the Data • Cinematography and Image based Analysis • Video Based 2 D & 3 D. • Opto-Electronic Based 2D & 3D • Computer Graphics for Visualization and Animation, • X-ray Photogrammery. Biomechanical Analysis of Fitness, Sports Movements, Technique or Skill, and Performance:- • Qualitative Analysis • Quantitative Analysis • An Introduction to deterministic and Stochastic (Statistical) Bio-mechanics.UNIT-V: Biomechanical Basis of Fitness and Performance: • Principles and Evaluation of Training • Training of Strength, Speed Power, Endurance, Fatigue and Flexibility • Exercise Devices. • Different types of Exercise. • Methods and Means of Exercises • Biomechanical Measurements of Fitness and Performance Structure and Qualities of Motor Actions: • Structures and types of Motor Actions (Motor Movements) • Design of Motor Action in relation to it’s different parts/phase. • Analysis of Motor Action using biomechanical Instruments. • Different Qualities of Motor Actions • Measurement of different Qualities of Motor Action using Biomechanical Instruments.PRACTICAL: • Measurement of Postures • Measurement of Different Components of Fitness (biomechanical Applications) • General and Specific Fitness Measurement. • Evaluation of Exercise and Exercise Devices. • Use of EMG to Exercise, Fitness and Sports • Use of Force Platform, accelerometer and other dynamometers to Sports and Fitness. • Determination of C.G. using different methods and technology. • Use of Elgon to Sports. • Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis of Sports Techniques. 15
  • 16. SUGGESTED STUDIES:Basmajian, J.V. (1962). Muscles Alive: Their Functions Revealed by Electromyography. Baltimare:Williams and Wilkeins Co.Basmajian, J.V. (1971). Electromyographic Analysis in J.M. Cooper (Ed.) Selected Topic onBiomechanics, Chicago, Athletic Institute.Dempster, W.T. Free Body Diagrams as an Approach to the Mechanics of Human Posture and Motion inF.G. Evans (Ed.). Biomechanical Study of the Musculoskeletal System. Springfield. III: Chrles C. ThomasPublisher, 1961.Dilman, C.J. Muscular Torque Patterns of the Leg During the Recovery Phase of Sprint Running (DoctoralDissertation. Pennsylvania State University 1970). Dissertation Abstract International, 1971, 32, 222 A.(University Microfilms No.71-16.952).Grabiner (1993), M.D. Ed. Current Issue in biomechanics Champaign, Human Kinetics Publishers, 1993.Harries, R.W. Kinesiology Workbook and Laboratory Manual Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1977.Hartze, H. Letter: The Meaning of the Term “Biomechanics.” Journal of Biomechanics, 1974, 7, 189-190.Hartze, H. Biomechamical Aspects of a Successful Motion optiomization. In P.V. Komi (Ed.),Biomechanics V.B. Baltimore: University Park Press, 1976 (a).Hawley, G. The Kinesiology of Corrective Exercise. Philadelphia: Lea & Febiger, 1937.Hawley G., An Anatomical Analysis of Sports, New York: A.S. Barnes and Company, Inc., 1940.Hay J.G. Biomechanics of Sports Technique 3rd Ed., New Jersey: Prentice Hall, 1985.Higgines, J.R. Human Movement: An Integrated Approach, St. Louis: C.V. Mosby Company, 1977.Hockmuth, G. and Others Biomechanics of Athletic Movement. Berlin: Sporturlag, 1984.Karpovic, P.V. and Karpovich, G.P. Electorgoniometer: A New Device for Study of Joints in Action,Federation Proceedings, 1959, 18, 79.Knudson, Duane V. and Morrison, Graig S. (1997). Qualitative Analysis of Human Movement.Champaign. IL: Human Kinetics.Kreighbaum, E. and Barthels, K.M. Biomechanics. A Qualitative Approach for Studying Human Movement2nd Ed. New York: Macmillan Publishing Co., 1985.Laban, R. ‘Repreint’. Mastery of Movement 4th ed. V.K. Northcate House, 1988.Miller, D.I. Computer Simulation of Human Motion. In Techniques for the Analysis of Human Movement.Princeton: Princeton Book Company Publishers, 1975 (b).Miller, D.I. biomechanics of running – What should the Future Hold. Canadian Journal of Applied SportScience, 1978, 3, 229-236.Miller, D.I. Modelling in Biomechanics: An Overview, Medicine and Science in Sports, 1979, 11 (2), 115-122Miller, D.I. and Petak, K.L, Three – Dimensional Cinematography M.C. J. Widule (ed.). Kinesioligy Ill.Washington, D.C.: American Association for Health, Physical Education and Recreation, 1973.Mitchelson, D.L. An Opto – Electronic Techniques for Analysis of Angular Movement. In S. Cerquiqline, A.Venerando. & J. Wartenweiler (Eds.), biomechanics ill. Baltimore: University Park Press, 1973.Mitchelson, D.L. Recording of Movement without Photography, Techniques for the Analysis of HumanMovement. Princeton: Princeton Book Company Publishers, 1975.Moon, S.D. and Santer, S.L. Ed. Beyond Biomechanics Phychological Aspects of Musculo – SkeletalDisorders in Office Work: London, Tayler & Francis, 1996.Plagenhoef, S.C. An Analysis of the Kinematics and Kinetics of Selected Symmetrical Body Actions(Doctoral Dissertation, University of Michigan, 1962). Dissertation Abstract International, 1963, 23, 3227.(University Microfilms No.63-430).Plagenheof, S.C. Computer Programs for Obtaining Kinetic Data of Human Movement. Journal ofBiomechanics, 1968, 1, 221-234.Plagenheof. S.C. Patterns of Human Motions: A Cinematograph Analysis. Englewood Cliffs. N.J.:Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1971. 16
  • 17. Shaw, Dhananjoy (2000). Mechanical Basis of Biomechanics, New Delhi: Sports PublicationsShaw, Dhananjoy,Pedagogic Kinesiology. Delhi: Sports Publication, 1998.Shaw, Dhananjoy, Biomechanics and Kinsiology of human Motion. Delhi: Khel Sahitaya Kendra, 1998.Shaw, Dhananjoy and Shalini, “Evolution of Biomechanics As A Subject of 21st Century” Ed. Shukla, N.B.Recent Trend in Physical Education and Sports, Varanasi: Indian Society of Sports Scientist, 1999.Shaw, Dhananjoy and Tomar, Rakesh Doctoral Research in Physical Education and its Sciences inDevelopment Countries. Delhi: Khel Sahitya Kendra, 2000.Shaw, Dhananjoy and Gambhir, Shalini Encyclopaedia of Sports Injuries and Indian Sports Persons.Delhi: Khel Sahitya Kendra, 2000.Walters, C.E. and Partridge, M.J. An Electromyographic Study of the Differential Action of the AbdominalMuscles. American Journal of Physical Medicine, 1957, 36, 259-268.Walton, J.S. Close – Range Cine – Photogrammetry: Another Approach to Motion Analysis. In J. Terauds(Ed.), Science in Biomechanics cinematography. Del Mar, Calif.: Academic Publishers, 1979.Walton, J.S. and Kane, R. Interactive Computer Graphics: A New Coaching Aid. In E. Asmussen and K.Jorgenson (Eds.), Biomechanics VI-A, Baltimore: University Park Press, 1978.Widule, C.J. Analysis of Human Motion: Laboratory Experience, Experiments and Problems, Lajayette:Balt Publishers, 1974.Winter, D.A. Biomechanics of Human Movement: New York, John Wiley and Sow, 1979.Winter, D.A. Calculation and Interpretation of Mechanical Energy of Movement. In R.S. Hutton (Ed.)Exercise and Sports Sciences Reviews (Vol.6). Philadelphia: Frankin Institute Press, 1979.Zatziorsky, V.M. Studies of Motion and Motor Abilities of Sportsman, In R.C. Nelson and C.A. Morehouse(Eds.). Biomechanics IV, Baltimore: University Park Press, 1974.Zingg, W. The Role of Biomechanics in Sports Medicine, Athletic Tranining, 1975, 10 (2), 74-76. M.Phil. (Physical Education) Max. Marks: 70B-3: APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY IN SPORTS:Unit 1: The Foundation of Sports Psychology: - Brief History of Sports Psychology, Meaning, Definition and Boundaries of Sports Psychology. - Research Methods and Testing in Sports Psychology. - Principles and Conditions of Motor Skill Learning. - Meaning Nature & Dimensions of Developmental Psychology. - Factors Affecting Growth & Development.Unit-IIL: Participation in Sports: - Socialization in Sports, Perception of Influence of various Socialization agents. - Defining Motivation, Theories of Motivation, Motivation to continue or Discontinue participation in Sports. - Structure of Personality, Theories of Personality and Measurement of Personality. - Influence of Athletic Participation on Personality Development.Unit-III: Sports Psychology and Athletic Performance: - Information Processing and Attention in Sports. - Meaning and Definition of Arousal – Nurophysiology of Arousal. - Relationship between Arousal and Athletic Performance. - Stress and Anxiety in Sports. - Role of Stress and Anxiety on Sports Performa.Unit-IV: Sport – Psychology Interventions: - Cognitive Intervention in Sport – Imagery in Sport – Stress inoculation Training. - Psychological Skill Training for Sport – Attention Control Training. - Relaxation Procedures and Psyching up strategies. - Bio-feed back Technology and Application of Bio-feed back for Mental Training. 17
  • 18. Unit-V: Social Nature of Sports: - Meaning, Definition and Theories of Aggression. - Team Cohesion – Development and Measurement of Team Cohesion - Effects of Audience and Home Advantage in Sports. - Leadership in Sports – the Traits & Behavior of Successful Leader - Athletic Problem – Resist Coaching, The Con Man, Hyper Anxious, Success Phobia and Depression Prone Athletic.PracticalsMax. Marks: 30Student is required to perform the following Practicals: 1. Testing Pre-competitive Anxiety 2. Mirror Drawing 3. Maze Learning 4. Assessment of Personality (16 Point PF Personality Test) 5. Assessment of Mental Ability (I.Q.) 6. Test of Adjustment. 7. Test of Attention 8. Reaction Time Testing 9. Assessment of Aggression. M.Phil. (Physical Education)PAPER B-4 : SCIENTIFICE BASIS OF SPORTS TRAINING & EXCELLENCEM.M. = 70 Time = 3 Hrs.UNIT-I:SPORTS TRAINING - Definitions, Aim, Objectives and Characteristics, Principles of Sports Training - Training means:- Principle Means of Exercise, Pedagogical Measures, Medical & Physiotherapeutic Means, Psychological Means &Bio-Mechanical Means, Natural Means, Material Objects - Sources of Energy : Anaerobic, Lactic and Aerobic Sources of Energy - Training Methods Employed for Excellence:- Continuous Method and its Variations; Interval Methods and Repetition Method and the Physiological Effects, Training & Psychic Effects of Training Methods; Circuit Training; Plyometrics TrainingUNIT-IITRAINING LOAD, ADAPTATION AND RECOVERY - Concept of Load, Training & competition Demands & Degree of Load, Process of Load and Adaptation, Relationship of Load and Recovery, Factors of Load, Relationship Between Volume and Intensity - Dynamics of Increasing the Volume and Intensity, Intensity Zones for Strength, Speed, Endurance and Cyclic Sports. - Means to Assess the Load, Fatigue and Symptoms of Fatigue - Overload, Causes and Symptoms of Overload, Tackling of Over Load - Recovery, Factors affecting Recovery, Means and Methods of Recovery. 18
  • 19. UNIT-IIIBIO-MOTOR ABILITIES AND THEIR DEVELOPMENT- STRENGTH : Definition; Physiological Characteristics of Strength; Types of Muscle Contraction; Forms of Strength and their Significance in Training; Factors affecting Strength Performance; Methods of Strength Training; Methodological parameters related to Strength Training; Load Factors in relation to Strength Training; Characteristics of Maximum Strength; Explosive Strength and Strength Endurance; Training Methods for Development of various Forms of Strength.- ENDURANCE: Definition and Significance of Endurance; Factors affecting Endurance; Load Parameters for Development of Aerobic and Anaerobic Endurance; Methods to develop Endurance; Physiological Characteristics of Endurance; Forms of Endurance; Load factors in relation to Endurance Training; Nutrition and Endurance Performance.- SPEED: Definition; Forms of Speed; Factors Determining Speed; Load Parameters to Develop Speed; Development of Speed Abilities & Methods used for its Development; Physiological Characteristics of Speed.- FLEXIBILITY: Definition; Need and Importance for Flexibility; Factors affecting Flexibility; Types of Flexibility; Methods used to Develop Flexibility; Guideline to Flexibility Development.- COORDINATIVE ABILITIES : Definition; Factors Determining Coordinative Abilities; Importance and Need of Coordinative Abilities; Classification of Coordinative Abilities; Factors Affecting Coordinative Abilities; Forms of Coordinative Abilities; Methods used to Develop Coordinative Abilities.UNIT-IVTECHNICAL AND TACTICAL PREPARATION: - Definition and Meaning of Technique, Skill and Style, Motor Coordination and Motor Learning, Aim of Technique in Sports - Technique Training in various Phases, Implications for Technique Training, Methods Employed for Technique Training - Definition and Meaning of Tactics, Significance of Tactics, Aim of Tactics According to Sport - Tactical Action and its Phases, Training for Tactics - Principles of Tactical PreparationUNIT-VPLANNING, PERIODIZATION, AND TALENT IDENTIFICATION: - Definition, Need and Importance in Planning, Principles of Planning, Types of Plan - Periodization, Need of Periodization, Top Form and Periodization, Aims and Contents of various Periods of periodization, Types of Periodization, Periodization of Bio-Motor Abilities (Strength, Endurance and Speed) - Competition, Classification and Characteristics of Competition, The Number and Frequency of Competition, Preparation for Competition - Various Stages of Growth and Development, General Behavioural Patterns, Motor Development and Training Implications during various Stages of Growth and Development - Importance of Talent Identification, Methods of Talent Identification, Criteria Used fro Talent Identification, Phases of Talent Identification, Guidelines for Talent Identification, Factors for Talent Identification SCIENTIFICE BASIS OF SPORTS TRAINING & EXCELLENCE 19
  • 20. (PRACTICAL) M.M. = 30 1. Assessment of Maximum Strength 2. Assessment of Explosive Strength in Vertical and Forward Direction 3. Assessment of Muscular Endurance for Arms and Shoulder Girdle, Abdominal Muscles of the Legs, General Muscular Endurance of the Body. 4. Assessment of Endurance through-Twelve Minute and Nine Minutes Run Walk Test; Six Hundred Yards Run-Walk Test; Harvard Step Test; Forestry Step Test. 5. Assessment of Speed – Four Second Dash Test; Six Second Dash Test; 50 Yards Dash Test; 30 & 40 Yards Dash Test. 6. Assessment of Flexibility - Bridge-up Test; Sit and Reach Test; Front to Rear Split Test and Side Split Test; Shoulder and Wrist elevation Test; Trunk and Neck Extension Test; Shoulder Rotation Test; Ankle Plantar and Dorsi Flexion Test. 7. Assessment of Coordinative Abilities – Burpee Test; Side Step Test; Quadrant Jump Test; Semo- Agility Test; LSU Agility Test; Bass and Modified Bass Test; Nelson Test of Hand Reaction; Foot Reaction and Speed of Movement. 8. Periodizing Strength, Speed and Endurance Development Programme 9. Preparation of Annual Plan, Macro Cycle Plan, Meso Cycle Plan, and Micro Cycle Plan. 10. Preparation of Circuit Training Programme with & without Weights. 11. Preparation of Plyometric Training Programme. REFERENCE BOOKS1. Allan W. Jakson & James R. Morrow (1999), “Physical Activity for Health and Fitness”. (Human Kinetics).2. American College of Sports Medicine (1991), “Guidelines for Exercises Testing and Prescription” 4th ed. (Philadelphia : Lea & Febiger).3. B. Don, Frnak, Edward J. Howley (1995), “Fitness Leaders Handbook”. (Human Kinetics).4. Claude Bouchard, Roy J. Shephard, Thomas Stephens (1993), “Physical Activity, Fitness and Health Consensus Statement” (Human Kinetics Publishers).5. Davi C. Nieman (2000), “Fitness and Sports Medicine : A Health Related Approach” 3rd ed. (Mayfield Publicity Company).6. David N. Camaione (1993), “Fitness Management”: (Wels Brown & Benlr Mark).7. David R. Lamb (1984), “Physiology of Exercise, Responses and Adaptation” 2nd ed. (Mac. Milan Publishing Company).8. Hoeger (2005). “Principles and Labs in Fitness & Wellness”9. Katch, F.L. & Mc. Ardle, W.O. (1989). “Nutrition, Weight Control and Exercises” 3rd ed. (Philadelphia : Lea & Febiger).10. Roy J. Shephard (1994), “Aerobic Fitness and Health” (Human Kinetics Publishers).11. Singh, Hardayal, “Science of Sports Training” DVS Publications, New Delhi.12. Vivian H. Heyward (1991), “Advanced Fitness Assessment and Exercise Prescription 2nd ed. (Human Kinetics Publishers). M.Phil. (Physical Education) 20
  • 21. Max. Marks: 100B-5: APPLIED SOCIOLOGY IN SPORTS:Unit-I: Introduction to Sports, Culture and Society:1.1. Sports in Pervasive in Society, Understanding Sociology in the Context of Sport.1.2. Sport as a Social Phenomenon1.3. Sport as a form of Social Involvement1.4. Defining Sport, Sport in a Social Institution, Sport is a Social & Cultural Product.1.5. Sport as Reflection, Reinforcement & Resistance, the Illusion and Reality of Sport.Unit-II: Sports Reflects Culture & Society:2.1. Approaches to the Study of Socialization: The family and Sport Socialization, Family, Sport & Gender Differences.2.2. Socialization into Sport; Socialization via Sport; and Desocialization from Sport.2.3. School, Socialization and Sport Socialization;2.4. Impact of Sport on Education.2.5. College Sport as a Social Problem, Youth Groups and Sport Socialization, Youth Sport: A Social Problem.Unit-III: Sport-Law, Politics, Economy & the Mass Media:3.1. The Law and Sport, Civil Rights & Sport, The Law and Violence in Sports.3.2. Sports & Politics, Politics with in Sport, Public Policy & Sports, International Politics & Sports.3.3. Economic Activity associated with Sport, Organizational structure of professional sport, A business Model for professional sport.3.4. Economics & Sport for Women, Economics of International Sport, Gambling & Sport.3.5. Meaning of Mass Media, Theories of Communication, T.V. and Sport: A marriage of Convenience, Influency Media on Sport, Influence of Sport on the Media.Unit-IV: Sport Reinforces Social Inequalities:4.1. Defining Social Class and Socio-economic status, Social class and Primary Sport Involvement, Social class and Secondary Sport Involvement, Are Social Class Differences in Sport Involvement Diminishing?4.2. Social Mobility & Sport; Social Class, Conflict & Sport.4.3. Race and Primary & Secondary Involvement in Sport, Unequal Opportunities for equal ability; Race, Sport and Educational Attainment, Race Relations & Sport.4.4. Ethnicity & Sport; Ethnicity, Sport and Social Conflict.4.4. Definition of Gender, History of Women’s Involvement in Sport, Gender & Involvement in Sport Institutionalize Discrimination Against Women, Gender Role Conflict, Toward Gender Equality, Parallels in Age & Sport.Unit-V: Sport Is a Arena Resistance & Conflict:5.1. Culture & Subcultures; A vocational Occupational & Deviant Sport Sub-cultures, Cheating in Sport Subcultures.5.2. Delinquency & Sport, Are teams subcultures, Opposition & Social Change through Sport.5.3. Concept of collective behaviour and Social Movements, Perspectives on collective behaviour.5.4. History of collective behaviour in Sport Audiences, why in Sport setting for collective behaviour, Typologies of sport crowd behaviour.5.5. Social Control Policies & Legislation, collective Invitation of Sport Aggression, Social Movement & Social Change.REFERENCES: 21
  • 22. Birrell, Susan & Cheryl L. Cole. Women, Sport & Culture. Champaign Ill: Human Kinetics, 1994.Mc..Pherson, Barry D., Curtis. James E. and Loy, John W. The Social Significance of Sport. ChampaignIllinois: Human Kinetics Publishers (1989).Loy,John W., Mc. Pherson, Barry D. & Kenyon, Gerald. Sport & Social Systems. Philippines: Addison –Wesley Publishing Company (1978).Laker, Anthony. The Sociology of Sport and Physical Education. London: Routledge Falmer. 2002.Yiannakis, Andrew & Merrill J. Meluic. Contemporary Issues in Sociology of Sport. Champaign Ill:Human Kinetics. 2001.PAPER B-6 : PHYSIOLOGY OF SPORT AND EXERCISEMax. Marks: 70 Time : 3 Hrs.Note: This paper consists of Five Units. The candidate has to answer five questions in all,selecting one from each Unit.UNIT-IA. THE FOCUS OF EXERCISE AND SPORT PHYSIOLOGY: Exercise and Sport Physiology, it significance in exercise and sport, Concept of acute response and chronic adaptation, factors considered during monitoring, Ergometers, their advantages and disadvantages.B. THE NATURE OF SKELETAL MUSCLES: Gross Structure, the Myofibril, Sliding Filament Theory, Muscle Fibre Types and Athletic Success, Factors influencing Development of muscular force, Response and adaptation of skeletal Muscles to varied exercise and training programme.C. NEURAL CO-ORDINATION OF MUSCULAR MOVEMENT: Structure of the Neuron, Resting Membrane Potential, Action Potential and its Propagation, Nerve to Nerve Synapse, Neuromuscular junction, Muscle Fiber Recruitment, Proprioceptors, Nervous system and motor skill, neural adaptation to resistance training.UNIT-2A. BIO ENERGETICS: Anaerobic and Aerobic Systems and ATP Production, Oxidative Capacity of Muscle, Estimating Anaerobic Effort, BMR, Maximal Capacity for Exercise (VO2 max), Resting Energy Expenditure, Energy Cost of Activities, Fatigue and its Causes.B. HORMONAL REGULATION OF EXERCISE: Mechanism of hormone action, Endocrine glands their hormones and its response and adaptation to exercise and training.C. METABOLIC ADAPTATION TO TRAINING: Metabolic Adaptation to Aerobic Training Metabolic Adaptation to Anaerobic Training Monitoring Training ChangesUNIT-3A. THE CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM DURING EXERCISE AND TRAINING: Structure and Function of the Heart, Blood Composition, Blood Vessels, Extrinsic Control of Cardiac Activity, The ECG, Blood Pressure, Cardiac Hypertrophy, Cardiovascular Response and Adaptation to Exercise and Training. 22
  • 23. B. THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM AND EXERCISE AND TRAINING: Pulmonary Ventilation and its regulation, Pulmonary Diffusion, Various Respiratory Parameters, Arterio-venous Oxygen difference (a-VO2 diff.), Factors influencing O2 delivery and uptake, Anaerobic Threshold, Respiratory limitation to Performance, Respiratory System and Response and Adaptation to Exercise and Training, Second Wind, O2 debt.C. ENVIORNMENTAL ASPECTS OF SPORT PERFORMANCE: Mechanism of Thermo regulation, Physiological Changes accompanying Exercise in Heat, Cold and at High Altitude, Heat, Cold, and High Altitude acclimatization, Health risks associated with exercise in heat, cold and high altitude.UNIT-4A. WOMEN IN EXERCISE AND SPORT: Gender difference at Puberty, Special Areas of concern while exercising and Training (Menstruation, Menstrual dysfunction, Pregnancy, Childbirth, Osteoporosis, Eating Disorder, the Female Athlete Triad, Environmental factor.B. EXERCISE, SPORT AND AGING: The Aging Process, Theories of Aging, Physical and Physiological Changes Accompanying Aging, Exercise benefits for the elderly, Trainability of the Older Athlete.C. TRAINABILITY OF THE YOUNG ATHLETE: Issues related to the growth and development of selected body tissues, Physical and Physiological changes accompanying growth and development, Trainability of the Young Athlete.UNIT-5A. NUTRITIONAL ASPECT OF SPORT PERFORMANCE: The six Nutrient Classes, Water and Electrolyte Balance, the Pre-competition Meal, Glycogen loading, Sports Drink, Gastro Intestinal Function during Exercise.B. BODY COMPOSITION, SPORT PERFORMANCE AND HEALTH RELATED FATS: Concept of Body Composition, Methods to assess the Body Composition, Body Composition Status and Health related benefits and Sports Performance, Consequence of severe weight loss, Optimal Weight Loss, Obesity its Causes, Consequences and Prevention.C. EXERCISE PRESCRIPTION FOR HEALTH AND FITNESS: Concept of Exercise Prescription, Steps to be considered in Exercise Prescription, Factors affecting an individualized exercise program, Recommended Training Principles, Exercise Guidelines for Pregnant Women, Elderly, and other Population.PRACTICALSMax. Marks: 301. Assessing the Heart rate during: a) Rest b) Pre-exercise c) During exercise d) During recovery2. Measurement of Vital Capacity and Peak Flow Rate3. To measure the Anaerobic Power4. Assessment of Body Composition 23
  • 24. 5. Test of Cardio-respiratory Fitness: a) Step Test b) Endurance Run/Walk Test c) Bike Test d) Treadmill Test e) Any other Field/Lab. Test6. Basic Practical math in Exercise and Fitness Testing: i) Determining Resting Energy Expenditure ii) Calculation of Energy Cost of : - Level walking - Walking up a percent grade - Running - Stepping - Cycling iii) Calculation of - Exercise Intensity - Workload - Frequency - Running Speed, Percent Grade - Absolute VO2, Relative VO2 - MET Level - Converting MET to Kcal. - Basic Conversion Calculations REFERENCES 1. Allen W. Jakson, James R. Morrow (1999), Physical Activity for Health and Fitness. (Human Kinetics). 2. American College of Sports Medicine (1991), Guidelines for Exercise Testing and Prescription (4th ed): (Philadelphia; Lea & Febiger). 3. Ann F. Cowlin (2002), Women’s Fitness Program Development. (Human Kinetics). 4. B. Don. Franks, Edward J. Howley. (1995), Fitness Leaders Handbook. (Human Kinetics). 5. Claude Bouchard, Roy J. Shephard, Thomas Stephens (1993), Physical Activity, Fitness and Health Consensus Statement. (Human Kinetics Publishers). 6. David C. Nieman, Fitness and Sports Medicine (2000), A Health Related Approach. 3rd ed. (Mayfield Publicity Company). 7. David N. Camaione (1993), Fitness Management. (WCB Brown & Bench Mark). 8. David R. Lamb(1984), Physiology of Exercise: Responses and Adaptation 2nd ed. (Mac. Milan Publishing Company). 9. German J. Brisson. (1981), Lipids in Human Nutrition - An Appraisal of Some Dietary Concepts. (MTP Press Ltd. International Medicine Publishers) 10. Ira Wolinsky, James F. Hickson (1994), Nutrition in Exercise and Sport. (RC Press). 11. Jack, H. Willmore, David L. Costill (1994, Physiology of Sport and Exercise. (Human Kinetics). 12. Katch, F.L. & Mc. Ardle, W.O. (1989), Nutrition, Weight Control, and Exercise 3rd ed. (Philadelphia : Lea & Febiger). 13. Neil F. Gordon (1993), Stroke Your Complete Exercise Guide. (The Cooper Clinic and Research Institute Fitness Series : Human Kinetics Publishers). 14. Neil F. Grodon, (1993), Arthritis - Your Complete Exercise Guide. (The Cooper Clinic and Research Institute Fitness Series. Human Kinetics). 15. Roy J. Shephard (1994), Aerobic Fitness and Health. (Human Kinetics Publishers). 24
  • 25. 16. Shephard R.J. (1992), Effectiveness of Training Programmes for Prepubescent Children. (Champaign. I L: Human Kinetics). 17. Shephard, R.J. (1988), Exercise in Coronary Heart Disease. (Sports Medicine). 18. Stephen L. Gordon, Xavier Gonzalez, Mextre Welliam E. Garret, Sports and Exercise in Midlife. (Published by American Academy of Orthopaediac Surgeon). 19. Vivian H. Heyward. (1991), Advanced Fitness Assessment and Exercise Prescription 2nd ed. (Human Kinetics Publishers). 20. Wells, C.L.(1991), Women, Sport Performance : A Physiological Perspective 2nd ed. (Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics).PAPER B-7: CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT IN PHYSICAL EDUCATIONM.M. = 70 TIME = 3 HRS.UNIT-1: FIELD OF CURRICULUM 1.1 Curriculum Approaches – Behavioural, Managerial, System Academic & Huministic 1.2 Definitions, Rationale and Issues 1.3. Foundations 1.4 Curriculum – 1.4.1 Domains 1.5 Curriculum Innovation 1.1.1 Research trend Lab. Field 1.1.2 Administrative Practices, PeriodicalsUNIT-2: THEORY OF CURRICULUM OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION: 2.1 Theoretical Perspective 2.2 Curriculum Design, Sources, Conceptual Framework, Study Models (Subject, Learner, Problem Design) 2.3 Objectives, Aim, Goals & Meaning, Functions & Building of Theory 2.4 Curriculum Contents and Selection of Curriculum Experiences 2.5 Factors Effecting Physical Education CurriculumUNIT-3: PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT: 1.1. Curriculum Development 1.1.1. Active Curriculum Framework 1.1.2. Skill Development Concerns 1.1.3. Sex Integrated Programme Plans 1.1.4. Urban & Rural Programmes 1.1.5. Multicultural Physical Education 1.2. Participants in Developing Curriculum: Political, Social, School / Institution, Outside School 1.3. Components Affecting Developing Curriculum – Contents, Experiences and Environment. 1.4. The Professional Imperatives of Quality CurriculumUNIT-4: IMPLEMENTATION AND NATIONAL PERSPECTIVE 1.1 Organization, Implementation 25
  • 26. 1.2 Transaction of Curriculum Experiences, Making Intentional Choices 1.3 Comparative Study of School Curriculum – CBSE, NCERT etc. 1.4 Comparative Study of Higher Education Curriculum 1.5 Physical Education in National Perspective/CurriculumUNIT-5: EVALUATION FEEDBACK & SHAPING OF FUTURE: 5.1 Nature & Perspective of evaluation and feedback; Evaluation Vs Measurement 5.2 Approaches; Humanistic, Scientific, Formative, Summaries – Study of Different Model 5.3 Programme for Evaluation; Development Measuring Primary, Secondary & Higher Education 5.4 Evaluating Intra/Extra-Murals Programmes 5.5 Evaluation in Service & Professional Development, Trends in Feedback ResearchPRACTICAL:M.M. = 30 1. Development of Curriculum – Elementary, Secondary, Higher Programme (Individualized – Need Based) 2. Resources – Compilation for Different Level of Curriculum 3. Making Physical Education Indispensable an Action Plan 4. Task-sheet : Preparation for Daily, Weekly, Monthly, Yearly Instructions 5. Evaluation: Intra/Extra murals Programme. 6. Diary Writing for curriculum maint. 7. Evaluation of Seminar/clinics/Conferences/Work for curriculum feedback. 8. Evaluation: Break-up of component weightage difference programmes/curriculum. REFERENCES 1. Boyce, B. A. (1989), “Goal Setting : The Ground Rules” Strategies Vol. 3, No. 2. 2. Butler, L.F. and Anderson, S.P. (2002), “Inspiring Students to a Lifetime of Physical Activity” JOPERD Vol. 73, No. 9. 3. Docheff (1990), “The Feeback Sandwich” JOPERD Vol. 61, No. 9. 4. Edge, D. M. and Clawton, D. B. (2003), “21st Century Literature Search in Physical Education ”Journal of Physical Education, Recreation and Dance Vol. 71, No. 6. 5. Hilda, Taba (1982), “Curriculum Theory and Practice” (New York : Harcourt Press). 6. Kirk, D. (1988), “Physical Education and Curriculum Study : A Critical Introduction” (London : Croomttelm). 7. Ornsteing, A. C. and Hunkins, F. P. (1988), “Curriculum foundations, Principles and Issues” Boston, Allyn & Bacon). 8. Sandhu, Kiran (2005), “Professional Preparation and Career Development” (Delhi : Friends Publications). 9. Sandhu, Kiran (2006), “Trends & Developments in Leadership Preparation in Physical Education” (Delhi : Friends Publications). 10. Wessel, J.A. & Kelly (1985), “Achievement Based Curriculum Development in Physical Education” (Philadelphia : Lea & Febiger). 11. Willgoose, C.E.C. (1983), “The Curriculum in Physical Education” (N.J. Prentice Hall). M.Phil. (Physical Education) Max. Marks: 100Time – 3 Hrs. Theory – 70 Practical - 30B-8: ATHLETIC CARE AND REHABILITATION (ACR): 26
  • 27. Unit 1: Introduction:1.1. Meaning and Definition of related Terminology. i) Athlete: Health, Fitness, Wellness and Life-style & Sports Performance. ii) Care: Before, during and after completion. iii) Rehabilitation: Aims, Objectives and Principles.1.2. Scope, Objectives and Importance of ACR1.3. Need of ACR for Physical Education Professional.1.4. Role of Physical Education Professional in ACR1.5. Historical Development/Land Marks/IOC/IOA.Unit-II: Injuries and Preventive/Safety Measures:2.1. Introduction, Meaning, Definition & Terminologies used in Sports Injuries (Macro- trauma, Acute-Chronic, Major-Minor, Soft tissue-Hard tissue, Mild, Moderate & Severe).2.2. Head to Toe Injuries, Sports Specific Injuries, and Common Injuries.2.3. Reasons, Causes, Types and Classification of Sports Injuries.2.4. Early Diagnosis, Treatment & Management of Sports Injuries.2.5. Prevention and Safety Measures.Unit-III: Doping in Sports (Drug Abuse)/Ergogenic Aid and Sports Performance):3.1. Definition, Meaning and Classes of banned drugs in Sports.3.2. Side Effects of banned drugs in Sports.3.3. Detection of doping and sanction against offenders.3.4. Meaning, Definition of Ergogenic Aids in Sports.3.5. Types, Advantages, Risk Associated with use of Ergogenic Aid.Unit-IV: Women and Sports Performance:4.1. Introduction to Women & Sports Performance.4.2. Physical & Physiological, Bio-chemical and Bio-mechanical difference between men and women.4.3. Training and Suitability of Sports at various stages of life.4.4. Premenstrual syndrome, Amenorrhaa, and Sports Performance aging, and Sports Performance.4.5. Female Athlete Triad, Eating Disorder, Osteoporosis and Inactivity. Exercise benefits in Old age.Unit-V: Environment Effect on Sports Performance (Children and Old Age in Sports):5.1. Introduction, Meaning, Types of Environmental conditions.5.2. Training in Different Temperature (Hot and Cold Environment Conditions). Training in Different Attitude (High Altitude and High Pressure).5.3. Medical Problems, Symptoms, Treatment and acclimatization in different Temperature & altitude/Pressure.5.4. Introduction: Effect of Chronological & biological age in Sports. Suitability of game/sports at various stage of human life.5.5. Training Implication, Precautions, Peak Performance.PRACTICAL:1. Practical Demonstration and use of therapeutic modalities. i) Cryotherapy (Ice Therapy) ii) Hydrotherapy (Water Therapy) iii) Thermo therapy (Hot & Cold) iv) Electrotherapy (Tens, Ultrasound short wave Diathermy)2. Treatment and Management of Common Injuries. i) Soft Tissue Injuries ii) Bone Injuries iii) Joint Injuries 27
  • 28. 3. Rehabilitation/Therapeutic Exercises.4. Massage – Sports Performance. ii) Relaxation Massage iii) Muscle Tone Management using Massage iv) Massage for faster recovery from fatigue. v) Sports Specific Massage vi) Rehabilitative Massage etc.5. Visit to Rehabilitation Centres.6. Research and Practice Review of ACR. REFERENCES: 1. Armstrong & Tucker, “Injuries and Sports” Lindon Scauples Press 2. Carol C. Teitz, M.D., Scientific Foundations of Sports Medicine, 1993, B.C. Decker Inc 3. Domhnall Macauley, Sports Medicine Practical Guidelines for General Practice, 2001 Butterworth Heinemann 4. Joseph Ruten franz, Rolf Mocellin, and Fedinand Klimt, Children and Exercise XII 1993, Human Kinetics Publishers. 5. Josephs Torg, Athletic Injuries to the Head, Neck, and Face, 1995, Lee & Febiger. 6. Mark Harries, Clyde Williams, William D. Stanish and Lyle J. Micheli, Oxford Textbook of Sports Medicine, 1997, Mark Harries 7. Maughan, The Encyclopedia of Sports Medicine Nutrition in Sports, 2001. 8. More House & Rash “ Sports Medicine for Trainer”, HB Sounders 9. Pande P.K. & Gupta, L.C., Outline of ‘Sports Medine’ (1990) Jaypee Brother, Delhi 10. Pfeiffer & Mangus, Concepts of Athletic Training, 2000, Pfeiffer, Ronald P. 11. R.J. Maughan, Basic and Applied Sciences for Sports Medicine, 1999, Butterworth Heinemann. 12. Ryan J. Allan & Alhman J.L. Fred (1989). Edited ‘Sports Medicine’, Academic Press, INC, San Diego California. 13. Shaw, Dhananjoy and Gambhir, Shalini Encyclopaedia of Sports Injuries and Indian Sports Persons. Delhi: Khel Sahitya Kendra, 2000 14. Shaw, Dhananjoy and Tomar, Rakesh Doctoral Research in Physical Education and its Sciences in Development Countries. Delhi: Khel Sahitya Kendra, 2000. 15. Steven Roy, Irvin Richar. “Sports Medicine” (1983) Prentice Hall. 16. Steven Roy/Richard Irvin, Sports Medicine Prevention, Evaluation, Management, and Rehabilitation, 1999, Roy Steven, Sports Medicine for the athletic trainer. 17. Singh, M.K, ‘Indian Women & Sports’ (1990). Rawat Publications, Jaipur. 18. Vijay, Handbook of Sports Medicine, 2001, Mrs. Sushil Gosain. 19. Wade A. Liggegard, Janus D. Butcher, Kasen S. Rucker, Handbook of Sport Medicine, Second, Butterworth Heinemann, www.bh.com. 20. Wells L. Christine, (1991). Women, Sports & Performance, A Physiological Perspective Human Kinetics Publishers, Inc Champaign. 21. Willian, J.G.P. “Sports Medicine” London Edwar Arnold Publisher. M.Phil. (Physical Education) Max. Marks: 70B-9: TEST, MEASUREMENT & EVALUATION IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION & SPORTS:Unit 1: Introduction, Foundation and Education: 1. Introduction: Meanings, definitions and relationships among test, measurement and evaluation. 2. Basic Foundations: Meaning, definition and comparative importance of different type of Validity, Reliability, Objectivity, Precision. Testing and establishing of different type of Validity, Reliability, Objectivity and Precision. 3. Statistical Foundations: Measure of Central Tendency, Measure of Variability, Comparative Statistics Correlational Statistics. 28
  • 29. 4. Evaluative Foundations: Meaning, Definition and relative importance of different types of Norms and Standards. Development of different type of Norms, scales and Standards of Physical Education. 5. Education: Establishing Instruments’ reliability, testers’ reliability and authenticity of Data.Unit 2: Tests and Tools: 6. Introduction, Meanings, Definitions and Types of Tests and Tools in measurement & Evaluation in Physical Education; Principles and steps of Construction of Knowledge, Fitness and Skill tests. 7. Kinanthropometric Tests for measuring Body Weight, Height, Percentage Fat, Physical Growth & Development, Flexibility, and Nutrition. 8. Biomechanical Tests for measuring Kinematic and Kinetic, variables, Segmental mass, mass moment inertia, Centre of Gravity. 9. Exercise Physiological Tests for measuring Pulse Rate, Blood Pressure, Basal Metabolic Rate Calculations, Cycle Ergometers, Treadmills and Exercise Tolerance Test. 10. Sports Psychological and Skill Testing: Knowledge Tests; Aptitute Tests; Memory Drum, Reaction Timers, Polygraphs, Perception Testers, Ophthoalmodynamometers; Co-ordination Testers, Weight Estimator, Coin-sorting, General Sports Skill Tests.Unit 3: Measurements and Applications: 11. Kinanthropometric Measurement Techniques of various Kinanthropometric Tests given in Unit 2 above. 12. Biomechanical Measurement Procedures for Biomechanical Tools given in Unit2. 13. Exercise Physiological Measurement Techniques of tests Tests given in Unit 2. 14. Psychological Measurement Techniques with Test included in Unit 2. 15. General Sports Skill measurements with laboratory tests and field tests.Unit 4: Evaluation: 16. Evaluation and Levels of Measurement: Nominal, Ordinal, Interval and Ratio Scale evaluations. 17. Introduction, Meanings, Definitions and Types of Grades. 18. Grading Systems and Factors used in Grading (Affective, Cognitive and Psychomotor Grading Factors); Weightage of Factors in Grading. 19. Health Education Evaluation: PRECEDE Model Diagnostic Evaluation; Weight Control Evaluation, General Health Status Evaluation. 20. Skill Evaluation and Rating Scales: Subjective and Objective Evaluation, Construction of Rating Scales of Evaluation; General Procedures for Skill Achievement Evaluation (Pilot Study, Revision of Evaluation Battery and Validity of Evaluation Batteries).Unit 5: Utility and Evaluation: 21. Computer: An Introduction to Computer and its applications to Test, Measurement and Evaluation. 22. An Introduction to Factor Analysis for Physical Education. 23. An Introduction to other Multivariate applications for Physical Education. 24. An Introduction to Regression Analysis to Physical Education. 25. Wellness evaluation and utility in overall lifestyle improvements at individual, society, nation and international levels.PRACTICAL MAX. MARKS: 30 1. Evaluation of General Health Status by using Body Mass Index on five subjects. 2. Evaluation of General Health Status of five subjects based on pulse rate, blood pressure, percentage body fat. 3. Evaluation of Centre of Gravity of five subjects. 4. Evaluation of selected RM and MVC of five subjects. 5. Evaluation of shoulder flexibility of five subjects. 6. Evaluation of sit and reach test of five subjects. 7. Evaluation of Basal Metabolic Rate of five subjects. 29
  • 30. 8. Evaluation of Body Weight of five subjects as per weight control guidelines.9. Evaluation of Visual & Auditory Reaction time of five subjects.10. Evaluation of Perception Test of five subjects.11. Evaluation of general Co-ordination of five subjects.12. Evaluation of Grades of five subjects from the marks obtained by them in various subjects of examination.13. Measurement of Cardio-respiratory functions using Treadmill, Bicycle ergometer etc.14. Measurement of Ground Reaction force .15. Measurement of Selected Segmental ROM.16. Measurement of Skill specific fitness.17. Evaluation of Selected Sports Skill.18. Practical Applications of Selected Statistical Software. SUGGESTED READINGS:1. Anspaugh, D.J., M.H. Hamrick and F.D. Rosato. (2001). Wellness Fundamental Concepts and Applications. Mc GrawHill Higher Education Company, Inc. New York, USA.2. Barrow, H.M., R. McGee and K.A. Tritschler (1989). Practical Measurement in Physical Education and Sports. Lea & Febiger, Philadelphia, U.S.A.3. Baumgartner, T.A. and A.S. Jackson (1995). Measurement for Evaluation in Physical Education & Exercise Science. WCB-Brown & Enchmark Publishers, Madison, Wisconsin, USA.4. Chopra, D. (1993). Ageless Body, Timeless Mind: A Practical Alternative to Growing Old. Crown Publishers Inc., New York, USA (Indian Print by Runa & Co. & Gopsons Papers Ltd., Noida, U.P.).5. Dochery, D. (Ed.) 1996. Measurement in Pediatric Exercise Science. Human Kinetics, Champaign, Illinois 61825, USA.6. Hoeger WWK and S.A. Hoeger (2005). Principles and Labs. for Physical Fitness and Wellness. Morton Publishing Company, Englewood, Colarado, USA.7. Kansal, D.K. (2006). Test, Measurement and Evaluation in Physical Educational Sports. Sports and Spiritual Science Publications, New Delhi.8. Koul, L. (2002). Methodology of Educational Research, Vikas Publishing House, Pvt. Ltd.9. Miller, D.K. (1994). Measurement by the Physical Educator: Why and How. WCB. Brown & Benchmark Publishers, Madison, Wisconsin, USA.10. Safrit, M.J. (1990). Introduction to Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science. Times Mirror/Mosby College Publishing, St. Louis, USA.11. Sarvela, P.D. and R.J. McDermott (1993). Health Education Evaluation and Measurement. WCB Brown & Benchmark Publishers, Madison, Wisconrin, USA.12. Shaw, Dhananjoy. Fundamental Statistics in Physical Education and Sports (1998, 2000, 2006) Sports Publication, New Delhi.13. TKK Psychological & Physiological Apparatus Mannual (2001). TTK Takai and Company, Ltd., Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo, Japan.2.2.2 STATUS The proposed course of study has been approved by Faculty of Interdisciplinary & Applied Sciences, University of Delhi and process of approval for implementation. 30
  • 31. 2.3 Two-Year Masters Degree in Physical Education (M.P.Ed.)* - Existing 2.3.1 ORDINANCES AND COURSE OF STUDYThere shall be a Master of Physical Education (M.P.Ed.) course in the Department of Physical Education &Sports Sciences, which is a professional degree course. The duration of the course shall be two years.ELIGIBLITY: 1. Every candidate seeking admission to the examination for the degree of Master of Physical Education (M.P.Ed.) Part-I shall satisfy the following conditions: - a) The candidate must have passed the Bachelor of Physical Education (B.P.E./B.P.Ed./D.P.Ed./P.G.D.P.Ed.) or B.Sc. (Physical Education, Health Education & Sports) Examination of the University of Delhi or any other examination recognized as equivalent thereto with a minimum of 50% marks in aggregate. In case, a relaxation is given to any specific category of candidate/s it shall be approved by the National Council of Teacher Education (N.C.T.E.)/Faculty concerned of University of Delhi. There shall however be a relaxation of 55% marks for those who are position holders (1st, 2nd or 3rd) in State Level sports/games and those who have participated in the National level sports/games. b) Fitness: The candidate shall be medically fit to carry out the vigorous physical and academic activities concerning curriculum and co-curricular activities, which run throughout the year. c) Age: The candidate shall attain minimum twenty years of age before the first day of October of the year in which he/she seeks admission to the M.P.Ed. Examinations. However, relaxation of age limit up to a maximum of one year on the basis of individual merits may be made by the Vice-Chancellor, University of Delhi through the Principal of the Institution concerned. d) Attendance: A candidate to be eligible for appearing in the final Annual Examination for Master of Physical Education (M.P.Ed.) Part-I & II shall have at least 80% attendance in aggregate and 70% attendance separately in each paper including theory and practical. e) Maximum Duration: The maximum duration of Master of Physical Education course Part-I and Part-II shall not exceed to four years from the first year of the initial admission to the course. f) Nature of the Course: the Master of Physical Education (M.P.Ed.) is a regular course on full time basis, which is only the on-campus course. g) Reservations: Reservations for Schedule Caste/Schedule Tribes will be as per the norms of the Central Government/ University of Delhi, Delhi. 2. THE COURSE OF STUDY AND EXAMINATION SHALL BE AS FOLLOWS FOR M.P.Ed. PART-I EXAMINATION: At the end of the first academic session, the candidate shall be examined in Part-I of the course as: - 31
  • 32. _________________________________________________________________________________ Paper Title Theory Internal Practical (Max.Marks) Assessment (Max.Marks) (1) (2) (3) ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ I Professional Preparation and 70 30 - Curriculum Design II Sports Management 70 30 - III Sports Psychology 70 30 25 IV Health Education & First Aid 70 30 25 V Research Process and Statistical 70 30 25 Techniques in Physical Education and Sports VI Measurement & Evaluation in 70 30 25 Physical Education & Sports VII Game of Specialization (Sports- 70 30 50 Specific Teaching & Performance: Out of the listed Sports) ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ TOTAL 490 210 150 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Theory Examination : 490 Marks Internal Assessment : 210 Marks Practical Examination : 150 Marks--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- M.P.Ed. Part-I Grand Total : 850 Marks-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 32
  • 33. THE COURSE OF STUDY AND EXAMINATION SHALL BE AS FOLLOWS FOR M.P.Ed. PART—IIEXAMINATION:After being promoted to M.P.Ed. Part-II, the candidate shall be examined at the end of the secondacademic session of the M.P.Ed. course:__________________________________________________________________________________Paper Title Theory Internal Practical (Max.Marks) Assessment (Max.Marks) (1) (2) (3)--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------VIII Scientific Methods of Training 70 30 25 and CoachingIX Sports Sociology and Social Welfare 70 30 -X Sports Bio-mechanics 70 30 25XI Exercise Physiology 70 30 25XII Sports Medicine 70 30 25XIII Dissertation/Project Report/ 70 30* - Long Essay (based on Field Work) (40** + 30***)XIV Game of Specialization (Sports- 70 30 50 Specific Coaching &Officiating: Out of the Listed Sports), to be carried on from the Part-I:--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- TOTAL 490 210 150--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Theory Examination : 490 Marks Internal Assessment : 210 Marks Practical Examination : 150 Marks--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- M.P.Ed. Part-II Grand Total : 850 Marks---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Note:i) The written examination will be for 70 marks in each paper and 30 marks for internal assessment. The practical examination from Paper-III to VI shall be of 25 marks and for Paper VII (Game of Specialization) 50 marks .ii) The written/theory and practical examinations shall be held by the University of Delhi through the Institute concerned and through the approved examiners of the University of Delhi for each paper separately (theory as well as practical examinations).iii) The Paper-XIII (Dissertation/Project Report/Long Essay) shall be assessed as under: a) * Internal Assessment by the Supervisor : 30 Marks b) ** Assessment of the Report by an Examiner : 40 Marks other than the Supervisorc) *** Viva-voce to be conducted by an External : 30 Marks 33
  • 34. Examiner (The concerned Supervisor shallbe free to attend the Viva-voce examination ,but the marks shall be awarded by an external examiner).The candidate shall appear in the Viva-voce examination as one of the eligibilities to pass in this paperand for the successful award of the M.P.Ed. degree.iv) The Dissertation/Project Report/Long Essay shall be submitted in triplicate (two copies for the examiners other than the ‘Supervisor’ and one copy for the Library of the Institute) along with a short “Summary” within three weeks time of the conclusion of the written examination of M.P.Ed. (Part-II). The report shall be examined separately and the summary be kept in the Institute from which the candidate appears.v) Any candidate, who has been declared unsuccessful at the final Annual Examination, but has passed by paper XIII i.e. Dissertation/Project/Long Essay shall be exempted from submitting a fresh report at the next Annual Examination.vi) The written examination for 70 marks in each paper and 30 marks for the internal assessment and for the practical examination in Paper-VIII, X, XI, XII shall be of 25 marks and for Paper-XIV (Game of Specialization) 50 marks shall be allotted for the practical examination (except for Paper-XIII).vii) The written/theory and practical examinations shall be held by the University of Delhi through the Institute concerned through the approved examiners of the University of Delhi for each paper separately (theory as well as practical examinations).viii) The written examination of each paper shall be of three hours duration for M.P.Ed. Part-I and Part-II.Internal Assessment:The marks allotted for the internal assessment for each paper shall be awarded on the basis of tutorials,projects, assignments, class tests, presentations, seminars, workshops, attitude in the class, attendance etc.MEDIUM OF EXAMINATION:The medium of instruction and examination shall be English or Hindi for the M.P.Ed. (Part-I & II) course.RULES FOR PASS PERCENTAGE & AWARD OF DEGREE:i) The minimum marks required to pass the examination shall be 40% in each paper (Theory & Practical separately) with an aggregate of 45% in each M.P.Ed. Part. The candidate must secure 40% marks separately in the University Examination as well as in the total of university examination and internal assessment.ii) Any candidate, of Part I Examination who has obtained not less than 45% marks in the aggregate, but has failed in the maximum of two papers in M.P.Ed. Part I examination may be allowed to be promoted to the Part II. In such case, the candidate shall be allowed to reappear in that paper/s alongwith the M.P.Ed. Part II examination in the next final annual examination on payment of the prescribed fee for M.P.Ed. Part I. The candidate shall be declared to have passed the examination in the year in which he/she successfully completes his examination.iii) The candidate shall be promoted from M.P.Ed. Part I to Part II, if he/she fulfills all the conditions, prescribed for the promotion.iv) At the end of part II, the unsuccessful candidates shall be allowed to appear in the final examination in the next academic year as an Ex-student, in the papers in which they have not secured pass marks.v) The candidate shall qualify the written and practical examination both for each paper (where, practical examination is a part of the paper) at a stretch on one single attempt, not in parts. In case, if the candidate has passed in the practical examination (if practical examination is a part of the concerned paper) but has failed in theory examination in paper/s, as the case may be, the candidate shall appear only in the theory examination. However, if the candidate has been declared 34
  • 35. failed in the practical examination in paper/s, then the candidate shall have to appear in both theory and practical examinations.CLASSIFICATION OF THE RESULT: i) Distinction : Minimum 75% marks in aggregate in written, practical and internal assessment. ii) First Division : Minimum 60% of the total marks or above but below than 75%. iii) Second Division : Minimum 50% of the total marks or above but below than 60%. iv) Third Division : Passing with less than 50% marks in aggregate. MISCELLANEOUS: i) The duration of the course of study shall be of two academic years. ii) No candidate shall be allowed to appear in the final Annual Examination of M.P.Ed. Part-I, if he/she is in service on full time/part time basis before the completion of the final Annual Examination (theory, practical and internal assessment etc.). However, if the candidate has the permission from the employer concerned to join the course alongwith the approved Leave Certificate and ‘No Objection Certificate’ for the entire duration of the course of study, the candidate shall be eligible to carry on the course and may appear in the final examination (provided the candidate fulfill all other condition/s). In case of concealment of facts found/proved, the candidate shall be held responsible and action of debarring from the course and/or legal action shall be taken against him/her. iii) No female candidate shall be allowed to continue the course of study for the concerned academic year/s, if she carries pregnancy. iv) The candidate failing or failing to appear in the M.P.Ed. Part-II examination, shall be allowed to appear at the Part-II examination in the next academic year, only on being enrolled as an ‘Ex- student’ (provided, the candidate fulfills all the examination eligibility criteria to appear on the final examination) in accordance with the regulations prescribed on that behalf. Candidates must pass the M.P.Ed. course with in the duration of four years from the year of the first admission to the first year of the M.P.Ed. course. v) The candidate except Ex-student shall not be allowed to appear in the Annual Examination of M.P.Ed. Part-II, if he/she is in service on full/part-time basis before the completion of the final Annual Examination (theory/practical/internal assessment etc.) However, if the candidate submits the ‘Leave Certificate’ alongwith ‘No Objection Certificate’ from the present employer for the entire period of the course of study, he/she shall be eligible to appear in the concerned final annual examination, (provided, the candidate fulfills all the other condition). In case of concealment of facts found/proved, the candidate shall be held responsible and action of debarring from the course and/or legal action shall be taken against him/her. vi) No female candidate shall be allowed to continue the course of study for the concerned academic year/s in M.P.Ed. Part-II, if she carries pregnancy. However, the maximum duration of the course will be four years from the 1st year of initial admission to the course. vii) The candidate failing or failing to appear in the M.P.Ed. Part-I examination shall be allowed to appear at the Part-I examination in the next academic year, only on being enrolled as an ‘Ex- student’ (provided the candidate fulfills all the examination eligibility criteria to appear in the examination) in accordance with the regulations prescribed in that behalf. The candidate must pass the M.P.Ed. Part-I and Part-II examinations within the duration of four years, to be counted from the academic year of the first admission to the course. IMPROVEMENT OF EITHER PAPER/OR DEGREE: As provided in the M.A./M.Sc. rules. 35
  • 36. 2.4 Two-Year Masters Degree in Physical Education (M.P.Ed.) – Proposed (Semester System) DRAFT COPY SYLLABUS & COURSE OF STUDY APRIL 2008 DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION & SPORTS SCIENCES (University of Delhi) 36
  • 37. 2.4.1 LIST OF CONTENTSI ACKNOWLEDGEMENTSII OBSERVATIONS INVITEDIII THE SYLLABUS - M.P.ED SEMESTER SYSTEM - AN OVER VIEW - AT A GLANCE - TABLE OF DETAILED CONTENTS - DETAILED SYLLABUS SEMESTER-I SEMESTER-II SEMESTER-III SEMESTER-IV 37
  • 38. I ACKNOWLEDGEMENTSIt is to record deepest sense of appreciation and gratitude to: All the experts of various areas of Physical Education & Sports for their services and professional in-puts towards developing the present curriculum; Each participant for their commitment and contribution towards the present academic endeavour; University of Delhi for the academic sanction and financial support provided to the organization of the National Workshop held on “Review and Development of Curriculum” from 5th to 6th March 2008. Dr. Kiran Sandhu HODII OBSERVATIONS INVITED The proposed syllabi have been circulated for peer review. Hence observations are invited on the syllabi that follow in the next section. Kindly send your observations kiran_sandhi36@yahoo.co.inIII THE SYLLABUS – M.P.ED SEMESTER SYSTEM 38
  • 39. AN OVERVIEW Master’s of Physical Education (M.P.Ed) - Semester SystemOver View of the Scheme:In an over view, the proposal has following scheme of study: Four papers of study for each semester; Specialization for theory subject: four Papers of study in 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th semester. Specialization for Sports Activity area: three Papers of study for 1st,2nd,and 3rd semester Optional papers one paper each in 3rd and 4th semester Compulsory Dissertation/ thesis in 4th semester Compulsory two courses as add-on during course of study through all the semesters Internship/hands-on experiences Objectives: In summary, the Objectives of the proposal of M.P.Ed. (Semester System) is primarily to introduce: Globally accepted concept of Masters Level study through Semester System at University of Delhi. Conception and setting-up the scope of study for specialization in theory and activity areas of Physical education and Sports, so as to cater to various upcoming career options in physical education, sports and sports sciences with a specific focus on careers related with teaching and research, health & Fitness, Communications, Industry and Marketing, Management and organization. To provide opportunities and scope for higher study to the students from other stream of education especially the B.A. Programme, who peruse physical education as Application and Discipline courses. To provide for specialized branch of study at the credit of students, so that they may go for advanced study in the chosen area of commitment. To promote Research and Development in more focused way with analytical and in-depth understanding of a particular branch of study in Physical Education and sports. To pave way for developing specialized professionals in physical education and sports to take up future challenges in research, teaching and administrative careers. To provide scope of learning and acquisition of technical skills for Sports event management & organization in the national interest like Common Wealth Games, Olympics, Asians Games National Championship and other local level events etc. 39
  • 40. Areas of Study:Compulsory • Research Design & Statistics in Physical Education • Scientific Basis of Sports Training & Talent Identification • Measurement and Evaluation in Physical Education • Educational Technology and Pedagogy Techniques • Athlete’s Care & Rehabilitation • DissertationSubject Specialization • Exercise Physiology • Sport Biomechanics • Sport Psychology • Professional Preparation and Curriculum Design • Sport Sociology • Sport ManagementGame of Specialization • All sports conducted by AIU (Subject to availability of personnel & Infrastructure) - Module I, II, IIIOptional –I • Fundamentals Sport Sociology • Fundamentals of Sport Psychology • Fundamentals of Sport Biomechanics • Fundamentals of Exercise Physiology • Fundamentals of Sport Management & Administration • Fundamentals of Health EducationOptional II • Adapted Physical Education • Fitness & Wellness • Sport Therapy • Sport Journalism • Sport Industry & Marketing • Sport, Physical Activity & NutritionAdd-on Courses • Sports Nutrition and Exercise Prescription/Advance Fitness Assessment & Exercise Prescription • Sports Field Technology • Gymnasium Operations • Computer Application in Phy Edu & Sports • Life Saving Skills & Disaster Management • Adventure Sports Leadership Training • Sport and Community Volunteer Leadership • Sports for All • Physical Education for all • Study of Olympics 40
  • 41. AT A GLANCE 41
  • 42. Paper No. Name Semester I Semester II Semester III Semester IV I (i) Research Design & Statistics in Physical Education (Module I) II Scientific Basis of Sports Training & Talent Identification III (i) Game of Specialization • (Module I) (Skill Perfection & Teaching) • All sports conducted by AIU (Subject to availability of personnel & Infrastructure IV (i) Subject Specialization (Module I) IV. (i) a) Exercise Physiology IV. (i) b) Sport Biomechanics IV. (i) c) Sport Psychology IV. (i) d) Professional Preparation & Curriculum Design IV. (i) e) Sport Sociology IV. (i) f) Sport Management I (ii) Research Design & Statistics (Module 2) V Educational Technology & Pedagogy Techniques in Phy. Ed. III (ii) Game of Specialization • (Module 2) (Coaching & Performance) • All sports conducted by AIU (Subject to availability of personnel & Infrastructure IV (ii) Subject Specialization (Module 2) IV. (ii) a) Exercise Physiology IV. (ii) b) Sport Biomechanics IV. (ii) c) Sport Psychology IV. (ii) d) Professional Preparation & Curriculum Design IV. (ii) e) Sport Sociology IV. (ii) f) Sport Management VI Athlete’s Care & Rehabilitation III (iii) Game of Specialization • (Module 3) (Organization & Management of Sport Events) • All sports conducted by AIU (Subject to availability of personal & Infrastructure 42
  • 43. Paper No. Name Semester I Semester II Semester III Semester IV VII Optional Group I (one to be selected from list) VII (a) Fundamentals of Sport Sociology VII (b) Fundamentals of Sport Psychology VII (c) Fundamentals of Health Education VII (d) Fundamentals of Sport Biomechanics VII (e) Fundamentals of Exercise Physiology VII (f) Fundamentals of Sport Management & Administration IV (iii) Subject Specialization (Module 3) IV. (iii) a) Exercise Physiology IV. (iii) b) Sport Biomechanics IV. (iii) c) Sport Psychology IV. (iii) d) Professional Preparation & Curriculum Design IV. (iii) e) Sport Sociology IV. (iii) f) Sport Management VIII Optional Group II (one to be selected from list) VII (a) Adapted Physical Education VII (b) Fitness & Wellness VII (c) Sport Therapy VII (d) Sport Journalism VII (e) Sport Industry & Marketing VII (f) Sport, Physical Activity & Nutrition IX Dissertation X Measurement and Evaluation in Physical Education IV (iv) Subject Specialization (Module 4) IV. (iv) a) Exercise Physiology IV. (iv) b) Sport Biomechanics IV. (iv) c) Sport Psychology IV. (iv) d) Professional Preparation & Curriculum Design IV. (iv) e) Sport Sociology IV. (iv) f) Sport Management List of Add-on Courses:• •Sports Nutrition & Exercise Prescription/ Advance Fitness Assessment & Exercise Prescription; •Sports Field Technology; •Gymnasium Operations; •Computer Application in Phy Edu & Sports; •Life Saving Skills & Disaster Management; •Adventure Sports Leadership Training; •Sports and Community Volunteer Leadership; •Sports for All; •Physical Education for All; •Study of Olympics 43
  • 44. TABLE OF DETAILED CONTENTS 44
  • 45. ABLE OF DETAILED CONTENTSSEMESTER-IS. Paper No. Module Title of the Paper PageNo. No.1. I (i) I Research Process and Statistical Techniques in Physical 49 Education2. II Scientific Basis of Sports Training & Talent Identification 50-523. III (i) I Game of Specialization (One to be selected from the list) 1. Athletics 53 2. Aquatics (Swimming, Diving & Water-polo) 54 3. Badminton 55 4. Basketball 56 5. Cricket 57-58 6. Football 59-60 7. Gymnastics 61-62 8. Handball 63 9. Hockey 64 10. Judo 65 11. Kabaddi 66 12. Kho-Kho 67 68 13. Table Tennis 69 14. Volleyball 70 15. Yoga4. IV (i) I Subject Specialization (One to be selected from the list) 1. Exercise Physiology 71-73 2. Sport Biomechanics 74-76 3. Exercise & Sport Psychology 77-78 4. Professional Preparation & Curriculum Design 79 5. Sport Sociology 80-81 6. Sport Management 82 45
  • 46. SEMESTER-IIS. Paper Module Title of the Paper PageNo. No. No.1. I (ii) II Research Process and Statistical Techniques in Physical 84 Education2. V Educational Technology and Pedagogy Techniques in Physical 85 Education3. III (ii) II Game of Specialization (One to be selected from the list) 1. Athletics 86-87 2. Aquatics (Swimming, Diving & Water-polo) 88 3. Badminton 89 4. Basketball 90 5. Cricket 91-92 6. Football 93 7. Gymnastics 94-95 8. Handball 96 9. Hockey 97 10. Judo 98 11. Kabaddi 99 12. Kho-Kho 100 13. Table Tennis 101 14. Volleyball 102 15. Yoga 1034. IV (ii) II Subject Specialization (One to be selected from the list) 1. Exercise Physiology 104-105 2. Sports Biomechanics 106-107 3. Exercise & Sport Psychology 108-109 4. Professional Preparation & Curriculum Design 110 5. Sport Sociology 111-112 6. Sports Management 113 46
  • 47. SEMESTER-IIIS. Paper No. Module Title of the Paper Page No.No.1. VI Athlete’s Care and Rehabilitation 115-1162. III (iii) III Game of Specialization (One to be selected from the list) 1. Athletics 117 2. Aquatics (Swimming, Diving & Water-polo) 118 3. Badminton 119 4. Basketball 120 5. Cricket 121-122 6. Football 123 7. Gymnastics 124-125 8. Handball 126 9. Hockey 127 10. Judo 128 11. Kabaddi 129 12. Kho-Kho 130 13. Table Tennis 131 14. Volleyball 132 15. Yoga 1333. VII Optional Group-I (One to be selected from the list) 1. Fundamentals of Sport Sociology 134-135 2. Fundamentals of Sport Psychology 136-137 3. Fundamentals of Health Education 138 4. Fundamentals of Sport Biomechanics 139-141 5. Fundamentals of Exercise Physiology 142-143 6. Fundamentals of Sport Management & Administration 1444. IV (iii) III Subject Specialization (One to be selected from the list) 1. Exercise Physiology 145-146 2. Sport Biomechanics 147-148 3. Exercise & Sport Psychology 149 4. Professional Preparation & Curriculum Design 150 5. Sport Sociology 151 6. Sport Management 152 47
  • 48. SEMESTER-IVS. Paper Module Title of the Paper Page No.No. No.1. VIII Optional Group-II (One to be selected from the list) 1. Adapted Physical Education 154-155 2. Fitness and Wellness 156-157 3. Sport Therapy 158 4. Sport Journalism 159 5. Sport Industry & Marketing 160 6. Sport, Physical Activity & Nutrition 161-1622. IX Dissertation / Project Work / Long Essay 1633. X Measurement and Evaluation in Physical Education 164-1654. IV (iv) IV Subject Specialization (One to be selected from the list) 1. Exercise Physiology 166-167 2. Sport Biomechanics 168-169 3. Exercise & Sport Psychology 170 4. Professional Preparation & Curriculum Design 171 5. Sport Sociology 172 6. Sport Management 173ADD-ON COURSESS. No. Title of the Paper Page No. 1. Sports Nutrition and Exercise Prescription/ Advance Fitness Assessment & 175-178 Exercise Prescription 2. Sports Field Technology 179 3. Gymnasium Operations 180 4. Computer Applications in Physical Education & Sports 181 5. Life Saving Skills & Disaster Management 182 6. Adventure Sports Leadership Training 183 7. Sports and Community Volunteer Leadership 184 8. Sports for All 185 9. Physical Education for All 186 10. Study of Olympics 187 48
  • 49. SEMESTER-IS. Paper Module Title of the PaperNo. No.1. I (i) I Research Process and Statistical Techniques in Physical Education2. II Scientific Basis of Sports Training & Talent Identification3. III (i) I Game of Specialization (One to be selected from the list) 1. Athletics 2. Aquatics (Swimming, Diving & Water-polo) 3. Badminton 4. Basketball 5. Cricket 6. Football 7. Gymnastics 8. Handball 9. Hockey 10. Judo 11. Kabaddi 12. Kho-Kho 13. Table Tennis 14. Volleyball 15. Yoga4. IV (i) I Subject Specialization (One to be selected from the list) 1. Exercise Physiology 2. Sports Biomechanics 3. Exercise & Sport Psychology 4. Professional Preparation & Curriculum Design 5. Sport Sociology 6. Sport Management 49
  • 50. PAPER NO. – I (i) Module-I RESEARCH PROCESS AND STATISTICAL TECHNIQUES IN PHYSICAL EDUCATIONUNIT-I INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH 1.1 Meaning, need and nature 1.2 Types of research : Basic (fundamental), Applied and Action research 1.3 Identifying a research problem 1.4 Criteria in selecting a research problem 1.5 Stating the research problem 1.6 Formulating, presenting and listing hypothesis 1.7 Delimitation and limitation of a problemUNIT-II LITERATURE SEARCH 2.1 Reason for surveying related literature 2.2 Major literature resources 2.3 Documentation over-view 2.4 Library sources 2.5 Research reviews 2.6 Card catalogue indices – physical education indices 2.7 Abstracting materialUNIT-III DESCRIPTIVE METHODS OF RESEARCH 3.1 Historical research Meaning, nature and scope of historical research Sources of historical materials (primary and secondary) Evaluation of historical material – internal and external criticism – general principles of criticism Historical hypothesis Pitfalls in historical research 3.2 Philosophical Research Need, nature and techniques of thinking process Methods of philosophy Analyzing philosophil research problem Inductive and deductive reasoning 3.3 Survey and case study Meaning, need and scope of survey and case study in physical education Types of survey Survey techniques – by questionnaire, interviews, case study Qualitative and quantitative research data Procedure for developing a questionnaire, a checklist, a schedule, a score cardUNIT-IV INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS 4.1 Meaning, need and importance of statistics in physical education 4.2 Types of statistics – descriptive, comparative, relationship, inferential and predictive 4.3 Characteristics of data Raw scores Single scores Attribute and variable Types of data Population and sample Parameters and statistics Frequency distribution Discrete and continuous class intervals Measures of central tendency Measures of variabilityUNIT-V NON-PARAMETRIC STATISTIC 5.1 Uses and application of non-parametric statistic 5.2 Computation of chi-square, rank order correlation and tretrachoric correlation REFERENCESResearch Process 1. Author’s guide: Research Methods applied to Health Physical and Recreation, Washington, D.C. 1991. 2. Best John & Kahni, J.V. Research in Education, New Delhi. Prentice Hall of India (Pvt.) Ltd., 1992. 3. Clarke, H.H., The Application of Measurement in Health and Physical Education, 1992. 4. Shaw, Dhananjoy. Fundamental statistics in physical Education & Sports sciences, sports Publication, 2007. 50
  • 51. PAPER NO. – II Module-I SCIENTIFIC BASIS OF SPORTS TRAINING & TALENT IDENTIFICATIONUNIT-I 1.1 SPORTS TRAINING Importance and definition of sports training Aim and objectives of sports training Characteristics of sports training Principles of sports Training 1.2 TRAINING LOAD, ADAPTATION AND RECOVERY Concept of load Adaptation Relationship of load and recovery Factors of load Relationship between volume and intensity Overload Causes and symptoms of overload Tackling of over load 1.3 VARIOUS TRAINING METHODS Interval training method Repetition training method Continuous training method Circuit training method Fartlek training method Weight training method Resistance training method Plyometric methodUNIT-II BIO-MOTOR ABILITIES AND THEIR DEVELOPMENT 2.1 STRENGTH Types of strength Factors affecting strength performance Methods of strength : training maximum strength; explosive strength and Strength endurance 2.2 ENDURANCE Definition and significance of endurance Factors affecting endurance Forms of endurance Methods to develop endurance Load factors in relation to endurance training 2.3 SPEED Definition Forms of speed Factors determining speed Load parameters to develop speed Methods to develop speed abilities 51
  • 52. Physiological characteristics of speed. 2.4 FLEXIBILITY Definition Factors affecting flexibility; Types of flexibility Methods used to develop flexibility 2.5 COORDINATIVE ABILITIES Definition Classification of coordinative abilities Methods used to develop coordinative abilitiesUNIT-III TECHNICAL AND TACTICAL PREPARATION Definition and meaning of technique, skill and style Technique training & its implication in various phases; methods employed for technique training, causes of technical fault and their correction Definition and meaning of tactics, aim of tactics according to sport Training for tactics Principles of tactical preparationUNIT-IV COMPETITION TRAINING, PLANNING AND PERIODIZATION 4.1 Definition of planning Need and importance in planning Principles of planning Types of plan (training conception, macro, micro, meso and training session plan) 4.2 Periodization Need of periodization Top Form and periodization Aims and contents of various periods of periodization Types of periodization 4.3 Competition The number and frequency of competition Preparation for competition UNIT-V TELENT IDENTIFICATION AND ITS DEVELOPMENT 5.1 Talent identifications and its importance, 5.2 Phases of talent identification, 5.3 Guidelines for talent identification 5.4 Stages of growth and development, general behavioural patterns, 5.5 Motor development and training implications and differentPRACTICAL1. Assessment of maximum strength2. Assessment of explosive strength in vertical and forward direction3. Assessment of muscular endurance for arms and shoulder girdle, abdominal, muscles of the legs, general muscular endurance of the body.4. Assessment of endurance through-twelve minute and nine minutes run walk test; six hundred yards run-walk test; harvard step test; forestry step test.5. Assessment of speed – four second dash test; six second dash test; 50 yards dash test; 30 & 40 yards dash test. 52
  • 53. 6. Assessment of flexibility - bridge-up test; sit and reach test; front to rear split test and side split test; shoulder and wrist elevation test; trunk and neck extension test; shoulder rotation test; ankle plantar and dorsi flexion test.7. Assessment of coordinative abilities – burpee test; side step test; quadrant jump test; semo-agility test; lsu agility test; bass and modified bass test; nelson test of hand reaction; foot reaction and speed of movement.8. Designing & formulation of macro/micro/meso/training session plans.9. Measuring of pulse rate before, during & after training/workout/manually and with the help of “Heart Rate Monitor”.10. Teaching & learning of selected Psychological Skills Training (PST). REFERENCESSports Training 1. Allan W. Jakson & James R. Morrow (1999), “Physical Activity for Health and Fitness”. (Human Kinetics). th 2. American College of Sports Medicine (1991), “Guidelines for Exercises Testing and Prescription” 4 ed. (Philadelphia: Lea & Febiger). 3. Annette, Lang. Morning Strength Workouts. Human Kinetics, Champaign, Ilc, USA, 2007. 4. B. Don, Frnak, Edward J. Howley (1995), “Fitness Leaders Handbook”. (Human Kinetics). 5. Claude Bouchard, Roy J. Shephard, Thomas Stephens (1993), “Physical Activity, Fitness and Health Consensus Statement” (Human Kinetics Publishers). 6. Craig A. Wrisberg. Sports Skill Instruction for Coaches. Human Kinetics, Champaign, Ilc, USA, 2007. 7. Cratty, B. Perceptual and Motor Development in Infants and Children. Prentice Hall, 1989. 8. Daniel, D. Arnheim & William E.Prentice “Principles of Sports Training” Morby- Year Book Inc. St. Louis, 1993. rd 9. David C. Nieman (2000), “Fitness and Sports Medicine: A Health Related Approach” 3 ed. (Mayfield Publicity Company). 10. David N. Camaione (1993), “Fitness Management”: (Wels Brown & Benlr Mark). 11. David R. Lamb (1984), “Physiology of Exercise, Responses and Adaptation” 2nd ed. (Mac. Milan Publishing Company). 12. David, Sandler. Sports Power. Human Kinetics, Champaign,Ilc.,USA,2005. 13. Donald, Chu. Jumping Into Plyo metrics. Human Kinetics, Champaign, ILL, 1998. 14. Fuoss, Donald E., & Troppmann, Robert J. Effective Coaching (Apsychological Apporach), Macmillan Publishing Company & Collier Macmillan Publishers, 1985. 15. Hardayal Singh, Science of Sports Training, ND: D.A.V. Pub., 1993. 16. Herre, D., Principals of Sports Training, London : Grafion Book, 1982. 17. Hoeger (2005). “Principles and Labs in Fitness & Wellness” 18. Jenson, C.R. Fisher, A.G. Scientific Basic of Athletic Conditioning, Lea and Febiger, Philadephia, 1992. 19. Jones, J. Jones, Wells, L. Jannet, Peters, Rachael E., Johnson, Dewayne J., Effective Coaching (Principles &Practice). Allyn &Bacon, Massachusetts, USA, 1982. rd 20. Katch, F.L. & Mc. Ardle, W.O. (1989). “Nutrition, Weight Control and Exercises” 3 ed. (Philadelphia: Lea & Febiger). 21. Lee, E.brown & Vance A.Ferrigna. (editors). Training for speed, Agility and Quickness, Human Kinetics, Champaign,Ilc.,USA,2005. 22. Marney, B. Simon &Steren R. Levisohn. The Athlete within A Personal Guide To total Fitness. Little Brown Company, Boston, 1987. 23. Matveyew, L.P. Fundamentals of Sports Training (Translation from Russian) Mir. Publisers, Moscow, 1991. 24. Novich, Max M. & Taylor, Buddy Training Conditioning of Athletes. Lea &Febiger, Philadelphia, 1983. 25. Roy J. Shephard (1994), “Aerobic Fitness and Health” (Human Kinetics Publishers). 26. Singh, H., Science of Sports Training, Delhi : D.V.S Pub., 1991. 27. Thani, Yograj, Sports Training, Delhi: Sports, 2003. 28. Uppal, A.K. and Gautam, Principles of Sports Training, Delhi : Friends, 2001. 29. Vivian H. Heyward (1991), “Advanced Fitness Assessment and Exercise Prescription nd 2 ed. (Human Kinetics Publishers). 53
  • 54. 30. Willmore, J.H. Athletic Training &Physical Fitness. Allyand Bacon, Inc. Sydeny, 1987.PAPER NO. – III (i) Module-I GAME OF SPECIALIZATION – ATHLETICSFOCUSED ATHLETIC EVENTS:Running : SprintsJumps : Long Jump & Triple JumpThrows : Shot Put and Discus ThrowUNIT-I HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT AND MODERN TRENDS IN ATHLETICS 1.1 History of athletics – ancient and modern Olympics & other important national and international competitions 1.2 Structure and function of IAF (International Athletics Federation) & AFI (Athletics Federation of India), IOA (Indian Olympic Association) 1.3 Modern trends in athletics in terms of playfields, equipments etc. 1.4 General rules of athleticsUNIT-II TRAINING AND TECHNICAL PREPARATION FOR SPECIFIED ATHLETIC EVENTS 2.1 Required motor abilities 2.2 Technical preparation 2.3 Marking, construction and maintenance of Track & Field 2.4 Physical, physiological, psychological and sociological characteristics of athletesUNIT-III SYSTEMATIZATION OF TRAINING PROCESS 3.1 General training for children 3.2 Training for beginners 3.3 Training for intermediate players (advanced sportspersons) 3.4 Training for seniors (high performance sportspersons)UNIT-IV SAFETY MEASURES, PREVENTION AND MANAGEMENT OF INJURIES FOR SELECTED EVENTS 4.1 Safety measures and prevention of injuries 4.2 Management of injuries 4.3 Causes and remedies of injuries 4.4 Physiotherapy, rehabilitation and massageUNIT-V SPORTS NUTRITION 5.1 Meaning, definition, classification and components of nutrition 5.2 Energy requirements of athletes in specified events 5.3 Nutritional requirements of athletes : pre, during and post competition phases 5.4 Electrolytes – sports drinks, minerals and supplements : pre, during and post competitionPRACTICALS 1. Different techniques of specified events : sprints (start, finish etc.), throws (shot-put & discus), jumps (long jump, triple jump) 2. Warming-up and cooling down 3. Supplementary exercises for specified events 4. Visit to a stadium where the track and field facilities exist REFERENCESAthletics 1. Chauhan, B.S., Khel Jagat Mein Athletics, Jalandhar : A.P. Pub., 1999. 2. Evans, D.A., Teaching Athletics, London : Hodder, 1984. 3. Fox, E.L., Physiological Basis of Physical Education and Athletics, Brown Pub., 1989. 4. Frost, R.B. and others, Administration of Physical Education and Athletics, Delhi : Universal Book, 1992. 5. Gothi, Ekta, Teaching & Coaching Athletics, ND : Sport Pub., 1997. 6. Knight, T. and Troop, N., Sackville Illustrated Dictionary of Athletics, Jackvillie, 1988. 7. Knigt, T., Athletics, Backville Book, 1988. 8. Renwick, G.R., Play Better Athletics, Delhi: Sports Pub., 2001. 9. Shri Vastav, Abhay Kumar, Athletics, S & S Parkashan, 1997. 54
  • 55. 10. Singh, Granth, Track and Field Athletics, Delhi: Ashoka, 1998.11. Thani, Lokesh., Skills and Tactics Track Athletics, Delhi : Sports Pub., 1995.12. Thani, Y. ed., Encyclopedia of Athletics, Delhi, Gian Pub, 1991.13. Turbbull, S., Sports Views Guide Athletics, London : David & Charles, 1989.14. Warden, P., Take Up Athletics, Springfield Books Ltd., 1990.15. Weaver, T., Personal Best : Athletics, London : Willionm Colliv ., 1988. 55
  • 56. PAPER NO. – III (i) Module-I GAME OF SPECIALIZATION – AQUATICS (Swimming, Diving & Water-Polo)UNIT-I INTRODUCTION 1.1 Aquatics - historical perspectives, modern trends and developments 1.2 Structure and function of federation of International de Nation Amateur (FINA) 1.3 Fundamentals of swimming, diving and water-polo 1.4 Techniques and tactics in aquaticsUNIT-II TECHNICAL PREPARATION FOR SWIMMING 2.1 Motor abilities required 2.2 Technical preparation/shadow practice 2.3 Construction and maintenance of swimming pool 2.4 Physical, physiological and psychological preparationUNIT-III SYSTEMATIZATION OF TRAINING PROCESS 3.1 Systematizing training process for swimmers – warming-up, cooling-down, supplementary exercises, basic skills, weight-training, circuit-training etc. 3.2 Training for beginners 3.3 Training for intermediate swimmers 3.4 Training for high performance swimmersUNIT-IV SAFETY MEASURES, PREVENTION AND MANAGEMENT OF INJURIES 4.1 Prevention of injuries and safety measures 4.2 Causes and remedies of injuries in swimming 4.3 First-aid, treatment and management of injured swimmers 4.4 Physiotherapy, rehabilitation, massage and fitness managementUNIT-V SPORTS NUTRITION 5.1 Meaning, definition, classification and components of nutrition 5.2 Energy requirements of swimmers 5.3 Nutritional requirements of swimmers : pre, during and post competition phases 5.4 Electrolytes – sports drinks & minerals etc. : pre, during and post competitionPRACTICALS 1. Warming-up (general and specific), cooling down, and supplementary exercises 2. Demonstration of techniques 3. Variations and combinations of techniques 4. Training of fundamentals of Aquatics 5. Visit to the facilities of the game REFERENCESAquatics 1. Jain, R., Play and Learn Swimming, New Delhi, Khel Sahitya Kendra, 2003. 2. Kumar, Naveen., Coaching Successfully, Sports Publication, Delhi 2002. 3. Nelson, R., Macnee, M.J.Ed., Olympic Fact book: A Spectators Guide to the Summer games, New York Visible, 1996. 4. Thani, Lokesh., Swimming, Delhi, Sports Publisher, 2000. 5. Thani, Lokesh., Skill & Tactics Swimming" Delhi, Sports Publication, 1995. 56
  • 57. PAPER NO. – III (i) Module-I GAME OF SPECIALIZATION- BADMINTONUNIT-I HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT AND MODERN TRENDS IN BADMINTON 1.1 Origin, historical perspectives and modern trends & development of Badminton 1.2 Structure and function of badminton association of India (BAI), International Badminton Federation (IBF) and other associations 1.3 Orientation of the fundamental skills 1.4 Techniques and tactics 1.5 Individual and game strategiesUNIT-II TECHNICAL PREPARATION FOR BADMINTON 2.1 Training of motor components 2.2 Technical preparation – reflexes, perceptual sense, neuro-muscular coordination 2.3 Construction and maintenance of badminton court, equipments etc. 2.4 Physical and physiological preparation 2.5 Psychological preparationUNIT-III SYSTEMATIZATION OF TRAINING PROCESS 3.1 Systematizing training process for badminton players – general warming-up, specific warming-up and cooling-down 3.2 Supplementary exercises, basic skills, weight-training and circuit-training 3.3 Training for beginners 3.4 Training for intermediate players - advanced sportspersons 3.5 Training for seniors - high performance sportspersonsUNIT-IV SAFETY MEASURES, PREVENTION AND MANAGEMENT OF INJURIES 4.1 Prevention of injuries 4.2 Safety measures 4.3 Specific injuries in Badminton and their causes 4.4 Management of injuries 4.5 Rehabilitation of injured playersUNIT-V DIET, NUTRITION AND SPORTS PERFORMANCE 5.1 Meaning, definition, classification and components of nutrition 5.2 Energy requirements of badminton players 5.3 Nutritional requirements of badminton players : pre, during and post competition phases 5.4 Minerals 5.5 Sports drinks : pre, during and post competitionPRACTICALS 1. Demonstration of skills 2. Warming-up (general and specific), cooling down, and supplementary exercises 3. Training for foot work 4. Shadow practice and pressure training 5. Visit to a place where the facilities of Badminton exist REFERENCESBadminton 1. Ashok Kumar, Badminton, New Delhi Discovery, 2003. 2. Ballou, Palph B., Teaching Badminton, India, 1982. 3. Bloss, M.V & Hales, R.S., Badminton, WC Brown, 1994. 4. Davis, Pat, Badminton, S.A. David & Charles Inc., 1988. 5. Downey, J., How to Coach Badminton, London: Collins Pub., 1990. 6. Jain, Deepak, Teaching and Coaching –Badminton, Delhi: Khel S.K., 2001. 7. Kumar, Ashok, Badminton, Delhi: Discovery Pub., 1999. 8. Narang, P., Play and Learn Badminton, Khel Sahitaya Kendra, 2005. 9. Singh, M.K., A to Z Badminton, New Delhi, Friends Pub., 2006. 57
  • 58. 10. Singh, M.K., Comprehensive Badminton, N.D. Friends Pub., 2007.11. Talbot, Derlk, Top Coach Badminton, Britain: Q.A. Press, 1989. 58
  • 59. PAPER NO. – III (i) Module-I GAME OF SPECIALIZATION – BASKETBALLUNIT-I INTRODUCTION 1.1 Historical development of basketball at international and national level 1.2 Modern trends and developments in basketball 1.3 Organization of IBF 1.4 The congress, the board of administration, executive committee, the international commissions, the permanent secretariat, the continental confederations, the internal auditors 1.5 Organization and constitution of BFI and state bodiesUNIT-II RULES AND THEIR INTERPRETATIONS 2.1 Latest Rules, and their InterpretationsUNIT-III PREPARATION AND TRAINING 3.1 Prerequisites of preparation and training o Theory of basketball training process o General & specific warming–up, cooling down (specific exercises for basketball) 3.2 Principles of warming up and cooling down and their effects 3.3 Basic skills and techniques o Chest pass o Underhand pass o Dribbling o Shooting- long shooting, lay up shots 3.4 Preparation, pre-contact movement, contact Teaching progression 3.5 Coaching points 3.6 Tactical application 3.7 Drills for skill development (any five) 3.8 Defense patterns and drills (zone and man - man drill) 3.9 Lead up games for beginners in basketball 3.10 Teaching of basketball skill - preparing a lesson planUNIT-IV SPECIFIC TRAINING METHODS 4.1 Development of motor components with specific reference to basketball 4.2 Development of basketball specific fitness components 4.3 Specific training methods for different positionsUNIT-V MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION 5.1 Fitness tests 5.2 Skill Tests – AAHPERD, Johnson Basketball Test Battery, SAI Test Battery, Knox Test 5.3 Evaluation of team performance – observation techniques, statistical techniques, scouting chartsPRACTICAL 1. General and specific warm up 2. Teaching fundamental skills 3. Drills to develop fundamental skills 4. Drills for defense and offense system 5. Preparing and taking lesson plans for above 6. One on one measurement, development and evaluation of motor components 7. Preparing training load and schedule for basketball players 8. Executing : Fitness test, Knowledge test, Specific skill test REFERENCESBasket Ball 1. Ambler, V., How to Play Basket Ball, Delhi: Paper Balls, 1984. 2. Pruitt, Jim, Play Better Basket Ball, Great Britain: Matchplan Books, 1983. 3. Prutti, Jim, Play Better Basket Ball, Matchplay Books, 1984. 4. Thani, Lokesh, Skills & Tactics of Basket Ball, ND: Sport Pub., 1995. 5. Nat B. B Conditioning Coaches Association, NBA Power Conditioning, Human Kinetics, 1997 6. Jain, Naveen Play and Learn Basket Ball, Khel Sahitya Kendra, New Delhi-2003 7. Sharma O.P. Basket Ball Skills and Rules, Khel Sahitya Kendra Delhi-2003 8. Thani, Yograj, Coaching Successfully Basket Ball, Sports Publisher, Delhi-2002 59
  • 60. PAPER NO. – III (i) Module-I GAME OF SPECIALIZATION – CRICKETUNIT-I INTRODUCTION 1.1 Historical development of cricket at international and national level 1.2 Modern trends and developments in cricket 1.3 Organization of cricket at international and national level BCCI, ICC, DDCA, MCG, NCA etc. 1.4 Organizational setup and constitution of cricket and state bodiesUNIT-II RULES AND THEIR INTERPRETATIONS 2.1 Latest rules and their interpretationsUNIT-III PREPARATION AND TRAINING 3.1 Prerequisites of preparation and training • Theory of cricket training process • General and specific warming up and cooling down (specific exercises for cricketers) 3.2 Principles of warming up and cooling down and their effects 3.3 Basic skills and techniques • Batting - forward defense, backward defense, all types of drives, glance, cut, pull, and sweep • Bowling - medium pace, leg spin, off spin and their improvisation • Fielding - catching, ground fielding, close and deep fielding • Wicket keeping • Drills for skills development (any five) 3.4 Lead-up games for beginners in cricket 3.5 Teaching of cricket skill - preparing a lesson planUNIT- IV SPECIFIC TRAINING METHODS 4.1 Development of motor components with specific reference to cricket 4.2 Development of cricket specific fitness components 4.3 Specific training methods for different positions (slip catching, close fielding, fast bowling)UNIT-V MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION 5.1 Fitness tests 5.2 Skill tests – beep test, running between the wickets, different kinds of catches and throw 5.3 Evaluation of team performance – observation techniques, statistical techniques, scouting chartsPRACTICALS 1. General & specific warming-up 2. Training means for development of different components of physical & motor fitness (a) Speed (b) Strength (c) Endurance (d) Flexibility (e) Coordination (f) Core stability (g) Agility 3. Game officiating 4. Coaching lesson - 5 (five) internal lessons 60
  • 61. REFERENCESCricket 1. Aibara, E.B., Cricket, Delhi: National Museum, 1993. 2. Amarnath, Mohinder, Learn to Play Good Cricket, ND: Ubspd, 1996. 3. Andrew, K., Handbook of Cricket, England: Perlham Book, 1989. 4. Brown, The Pictorial History of Cricket, Hong Kong, 1988. 5. Chugh, G.D., Laws of Cricket, N.D. D.V.S.Pub., 1993. 6. Dellor, R., How to Coach Cricket, London: Mandola, 1990. 7. Jain, R., Play and Learn Cricket, New Delhi: K.S.K, 2003. 8. Kutty, S. K., Fielding Drills in Cricket, New Delhi: K.S.K, 2003. 9. Morrison, I., How to Play Cricket, Competition R. Pri. Ltd., 1993. 10. Rachna, Coaching Successfully: Cricket, Delhi: Sports, 2002. 11. Rachna, Jain, Play & Learn Cricket, Khel Sahitaya Kendra, 2005. 12. Rice P., How to Play Cricket, London: Guinness, 1988. 13. Sharangpani, R.C., Fitness Training in Cricket, Bombay: Marine Sports, 1992. 14. Sharma, Prahlad, Cricket, Jaipur: Shyam Prakashan, 2003. 15. Swpnronobe, E.W., Barclayas World of Cricket, London, Willow Book, 1986. 16. Thani, Vivek, Coaching Cricket, ND: Khel Sahitya, 1998. 17. Thasi, Y. [ed.], The Encyclopedia of Cricket, New Delhi, 1991. 18. Vic Marks, The Test Country Cricket Board Guide to Better Cricket, London, 1987. 19. Willis, Cricket, India, 1987. 61
  • 62. PAPER NO. – III (i) Module-I GAME OF SPECIALIZATION – FOOTBALLUNIT-I INTRODUCTION 1.1 Historical development of football at international and national level 1.2 Modern trends and developments in football 1.3 Organization of FIFA and the confederations 1.4 The congress, the board of administration, executive committee, the international commissions, the permanent secretariat, the continental confederations, the internal auditors 1.5 Organization and constitution of AFFI and state bodiesUNIT-II RULES AND THEIR INTERPRETATIONS 2.1 Latest rules and their interpretationsUNIT-III PREPARATION AND TRAINING 3.1 Prerequisites of preparation and training • Theory of football training process • General and specific warming - up and cooling down (specific exercises for football) o Principles of warming up and cooling down and their effects 3.2 Basic skills and techniques • Kicking • Receiving • Heading • Dribbling • Pyramid system – swiss bolt, three back system, 4-2-4 formation 3.3 Goal–keeping • Preparation, pre-contact movement, contact • Teaching progression • Coaching points • Tactical application • Drills for skill - development (any five) 3.4 The field defense – general characteristics, teaching progression and coaching tips, position specific and other defense drills 3.5 Lead - up games for beginners in football 3.6 Teaching of football skill - preparing a lesson planUNIT-IV SPECIFIC TRAINING METHODS 4.1 Development of motor components with specific reference to football 4.2 Development of football specific fitness components 4.3 Specific training methods for different positionsUNIT-V MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION 5.1 Fitness tests 5.2 Skill tests – Mcdonald test 5.3 Evaluation of team performance – observation techniques, statistical techniques, scouting charts 62
  • 63. PRACTICALAdvanced movements with the ball 1. Kicking – basic action, requirement, classification and types of kicking 2. Receiving – with the feet, legs, inside the foot, outside and sole, thigh, stomach, abdomen and chest 3. Heading – types of heading, surface of impact, proper movements 4. Dribbling and shooting– types of skills 5. Goal keeping – receiving the ball on floor and in the air, diving skills, punching the ball REFERENCESFootball 1. Lau, S.K., Encyclopedia of Football, Delhi : Sport Pub., 1995. 2. N. Kumar, Play and Learn Football, New Delhi : K.S.K, 2003. 3. Reilly, T., Science and Football, London: E.N. Sport Ltd., 1988. 4. Sharma, O.P., Teaching and Coaching –Football, Delhi : Khel S.K., 2001. 5. Shellito, K., Personal Best Football, London: William Collins & Sons, 1988. 6. Thani, Yograj, Coaching Successfully Football, New Delhi: K.S.K, 2002. 7. Williams, J., The Roots of Football, London, 1988. 8. Wirhed, R., Training to Win Football, Europ : Wolfe Pub., 1992. 63
  • 64. PAPER NO. – III (i) Module-I GAME OF SPECIALIZATION – GYMNASTICSUNIT-I HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT OF GYMNASTICS 1.1 Origin and development of gymnastics in India and Asia 1.2 Structure and function of FIG, GFI, AGU, AIUUNIT-II PRE-REQUISITES OF A GOOD GYMNASTICS COACH AND A GOOD GYMNAST 2.1 Gymnastics coach a. Qualifications, qualities and abilities b. Personality profiles of a gymnastics coach 2.2 Gymnast a. Kinanthropometrical demands (physique, body composition, somatotypes of men and women gymnasts) b. Conditional and coordinative abilities c. Psycho-social abilities 2.3 Knowing gymnastics terminology a. Definition and principles of terminology b. Methods of naming various gymnastics terms c. Names and definition of some basic positions and movements d. Principles of teaching, coaching and training of gymnastics movements on apparatusUNIT-III DEVELOPMENT, MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION OF MOTOR ABILITIES 3.1 Role of various motor abilities in gymnastics 3.2 Means and methods of developing general motor abilities and their evaluation 3.3 Means and methods of developing specific motor abilities and their evaluationUNIT-IV SAFETY MEASURES IN GYMNASTICS 4.1 Supporting techniques and their methods 4.2 Security – means and methods 4.3 Self security methods 4.4 Causes, prevention and remedies of injuries in gymnasticsUNIT-V THEORY OF VARIOUS FORMS OF GYMNASTICS 5.1 Rhythmic gymnastics : (i) basic exercises (throw, catch, jumps, turns, waves & balance); and (ii) combination 5.2 Physical fitness in gymnastics : (i) through free hand exercises; (ii) through apparatus i.e., medicine ball, skipping rope, wall bars, gymnastics bench, free weights, dumbles, multi gym, rope climbing, modern fitness equipment (treadmill, elliptical upright and recumbent bikes etc.) 5.3 Trampoline gymnastics : (i) jumps, (ii) somersaults (forward), (iii) twists/turns on small trampolinePRACTICALS 1. Rhythmic gymnastics : (i) basic exercises (throw, catch, jumps, turns, waves & balance); and (ii) combination 2. Physical fitness in gymnastics : (i) Free hand exercises; (ii) Use of apparatus - Medicine ball, skipping rope, wall bars, gymnastics bench, free weights, dumbles, multi gym, rope climbing, modern fitness equipment (treadmill, elliptical upright and recumbent bikes etc.) 3. Trampoline gymnastics : (i) jumps, (ii) somersaults (forward), (iii) twists/turns on small trampoline 4. Visit to the gymnastics centre 64
  • 65. REFERENCESGymnastics 1. Chakraborty, S. and Sharma, Lalit, Fundamental of Gymnastics, N.D. D.V.S. Pub., 1995. 2. Chakraborty, S., Fundamental of Gymnastics, New Delhi: DVS Pub, 1995. 3. Chakraborty, S., Womens Gymnastics, Delhi : Friends Pub., 1998. 4. Code of Points Trampoline Gymnastics, Federation Int. De Gymnasics, 2005. 5. Derry, G., Personal Best Gymnastics, London : Willionm Colliv ., 1988. 6. Federation Internationale Gymnastics, Federation Int. De Gymnasics, 2006. 7. Harvey, F.J., Physical Exercises & Gymnastics, ND: Khel Sahitya, 1998. 8. Jain, R., Play and Learn Gymnastics, Khel Sahitaya Kendra, 2005. 9. Jain, R., Play and Learn Gymnastics, New Delhi: K.S.K, 2003. 10. Pearson, D., Play The Game Gymnastics, Britain : Ward Lock, 1991. 11. Smither, Graham, Behing The Scence of Gymnastics, London, 1980. 12. Turoff, Fred, Artistic Gymnastics, U.S.A : C. Brown, 1991. 65
  • 66. PAPER NO. – III (i) Module-I GAME OF SPECIALIZATION – HANDBALLUNIT-I INTRODUCTION 1.1 Historical development of handball at international and national level 1.2 Modern trends and developments in handball 1.3 Organization of AHFI 1.4 The congress, the board of administration, executive committee, the international commissions, the permanent secretariat, the continental confederations, the internal Auditors 1.5 Organization and & constitutions of HFI and state bodiesUNIT-II RULES AND THEIR INTERPRETATIONS 2.1 Latest rules and their InterpretationsUNIT-III PREPARATION AND TRAINING 3.1 Prerequisites of preparation and training • Theory of handball training process • General and specific warming up and cooling down (specific exercises for handball) 3.2 Principles of warming up and cooling down and their effects 3.3 Basic Skills And Techniques • Catching – chest level, head and reaching height, side, below waist, one hand, in air • Passing – straight shoot pass (with and without blocking), underhand, wrist, push and bounce • Shooting (throw on goal ) - straight shot with variation, jump shot with variation, jump shot long (near shot zone) • Jump shot (long shot zone), penalty shot (7 m.), jump fall shot, side straight shot, back flick, lob • Dribbling – high and low • Feints – system of feints, play round and off, offensive and defensive • Goal keeper o Preparation, pre-contact movement, contact o Teaching progression o Coaching points o Tactical application o Drills for skill development (Any Five) 3.4 The Court Defense – general characteristics, teaching progression and coaching tips, position specific and other defense drills 3.5 Lead - up games for beginners in handball 3.6 Teaching of handball skill - preparing a lesson planUNIT-IV SPECIFIC TRAINING METHODS 4.1 Development of motor components with specific reference to handball 4.2 Development of handball specific fitness components 4.3 Specific training methods for different positionsUNIT-V MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION 5.1 Fitness tests 5.2 Skill tests (if any) 5.3 Evaluation of team performance – observation techniques, statistical techniques, scouting charts REFERENCESHandball 1. Jain, D., Play & Learn Handball, New Delhi, Khel Sahitya Kendra, 2003. 2. Kumar Ashok, Handball, New Delhi, Discovery Publishing House, 1999. 3. Lohar, A.R., Handball Basic Technology Bombay, The Marine Sports Publishing Division, 1998. 4. Schmottlach, N., Mcmanama, J., Physical Education Handbook. 9th Edition, London, Allyn & Bacon, 1997. 66
  • 67. PAPER NO. – III (i) Module-I GAMES OF SPECIALIZATION – HOCKEYUNIT-I INTRODUCTION 1.1 Historical development of hockey at international and national level 1.2 Modern trends and developments in hockey 1.3 Organizational setup of IHF • The congress, the board of administration, executive committee, the international commissions, the permanent secretariat, the continental confederations, the internal auditors 1.4 Organizational setup and constitution of HFI and state bodiesUNIT-II RULES AND THEIR INTERPRETATIONS 2.1 Latest rules, and their interpretationsUNIT-III PREPARATION AND TRAINING 3.1 Prerequisites of preparation and training • Theory of training process in hockey • General and specific warming up and cooling down (specific exercises for hockey) 3.2 Principles of warming-up and cooling down and their effects 3.4 Basic skills and techniques • Hitting • Passing • Dribbling • Scoop • Bully • Grip • Flicking • Goalkeeping Preparation, pre-contact movement, contact Teaching progression Coaching Points Tactical application Drills for skill development (any five) 3.5 The Field Defense – general characteristics, teaching progression and coaching tips, position specific and other defense drills 3.6 Lead - up games for beginners 3.7 Teaching of hockey skill - preparing a lesson planUNIT-IV SPECIFIC TRAINING METHODS 4.1 Development of motor components with specific reference to hockey 4.2 Development of hockey specific fitness components 4.3 Specific training methods for different positionsUNIT-V MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION 5.1 Fitness tests 5.2 Skill Tests – Schmithal’s French Field Test, Freidel Field Test, SAI Test 5.3 Evaluation of team performance – observation techniques, statistical techniques, scouting chartsPRACTICALS 1. Hitting – basic action, requirement, classification 2. Receiving 3. Dribbling and shooting– types of skills 4. Goal keeping – receiving the ball on floor and air, diving skills, punching the ball 5. Grip 6. Beating an opponent or dodging 7. Ball passing and tackling REFERENCESHockey 1. Dubey, H.C. Hockey, New Delhi, Discovery Publishing House, 1999 2. International Hockey Federation, Rules of the Game of Hockey with Guidance for Players and Umpires. India, International Hockey Federation, 2003. 3. Jain, D., Hockey Skills & Rules New Delhi, khel Sahitya Kendra, 2003. 4. Narang, P., Play & Learn Hockey, Khel Sahitya Kendra, New Delhi, 2003 5. Thani Yograj., Coaching Successfully Hockey, Delhi, Sports Publication, 2002. 67
  • 68. PAPER NO. – III (i) Module-I GAME OF SPECIALIZATION – JUDOUNIT-I INTRODUCTION TO JUDO 1.1 Origin, historical perspectives, development in India and World, modern trends 1.2 Structure and function of Judo Federation of India (JFI), International Judo Federation (IJF) 1.3 Fundamentals 1.4 Technique classification and tacticsUNIT-II TECHNICAL PREPARATION FOR JUDO 2.1 Required motor abilities 2.2 Technical preparation and grading system 2.3 Competition area, equipments etc. 2.4 Physical, physiological and psychological preparationUNIT-III SYSTEMATIZATION OF TRAINING PROCESS 3.1 Systematizing training process for players – warming-up, cooling-down, supplementary exercises, basic skills, weight-training, circuit-training 3.2 Training for beginners 3.3 Training for intermediate players 3.4 Training for high performersUNIT-IV SAFETY MEASURES, PREVENTION AND MANAGEMENT OF INJURIES 4.1 Prevention of injuries and safety measures 4.2 Causes and remedies of injuries in judo 4.3 First-aid, treatment and management of injured athletes 4.4 Physiotherapy, rehabilitation, massage and fitness managementUNIT-V DIET, NUTRITION AND SPORTS PERFORMANCE 5.1 Meaning, definition, classification and components of nutrition 5.2 Energy requirements of Judokas 5.3 Nutritional guidelines for Judokas : pre, during and post competition phases 5.4 Nutritional supplements, special diet and ergogenic aids : pre, during and post competition phasesPRACTICAL 1. Warming-up (general and specific), cooling down, supplementary and stretching exercises 2. Demonstration of judo techniques 3. Variations and combination of judo techniques 4. Training of fundamentals of judo 5. Visit to a Judo Centre REFERENCESJudo 1. Caffary, B., Skilful Judo, London : A & C Black, 1992. 2. Dando, J., Play The Game Judo, Great Britain: Blandford, 1994. 3. Harrison, E.J., Coaching Successfully Judo, Delhi: Sports, 2002. 4. Harrison, J., Teaching & Coaching Judo, ND: Sport Pub., 1998. 5. Holme, P., Get to Gripe With Judo, London : Blandford, 1995. 6. Holme, Peter, Competition Judo, London: Ward Lock, 1996. 7. Jain, D., Play and Learn Judo, New Delhi : K.S.K, 2003. 8. Kumar, Mukesh, Action Judo, Delhi : Sport Publication, 1994. 9. Marwood, D., Critical Judo, ND : A.I.T.B.S. Pub., 1995. 68
  • 69. PAPER NO. – III (i) Module-I GAMES OF SPECIALIZATION - KABADDIUNIT-I INTRODUCTION 1.1 Historical development of Kabaddi at Asian and national level 1.2 Modern trends and developments in Kabaddi 1.3 Organization of KFI and affiliated units 1.4 The congress, the board of administration, executive committee, the Asian commissions, the permanent secretariat, the internal auditorsUNIT-II RULES AND THEIR INTERPRETATIONS 2.1 Latest rules and their InterpretationsUNIT-III PREPARATION AND TRAINING 3.1 Prerequisites of preparation and training o Theory of Kabaddi training process o General and specific warming up and cooling down (specific exercises for Kabaddi) 3.2 Principles of warming up and cooling down and their effects 3.3 Basic skills and techniques o Raid – mule kick, corner chain break, shoulder jumping o Catching – ankle hold, waist hold, chain formations o Bonus • Preparation, pre-contact movement, contact • Teaching progression • Coaching points • Tactical application • Drills for skill development (any five) 3.4 The court defense – general characteristics, teaching progression and coaching tips, position specific and other defense drills 3.5 Lead-up games for beginners in Kabaddi 3.6 Teaching of Kabaddi skill - preparing a lesson planUNIT-IV SPECIFIC TRAINING METHODS 4.1 Development of motor components with specific reference to Kabaddi 4.2 Development of Kabaddi specific fitness components 4.3 Specific training methods for different positionsUNIT-V MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION 5.1 Fitness tests 5.2 Skill tests 5.3 Evaluation of team performance – observation techniques, statistical techniques, scouting charts REFERENCESKabaddi 1. Rao, C. V., Kabaddi, New Delhi: Oxford Press, 1982. 2. Rao, E.P., Modern Coaching in Kabaddi, D.V.S.Pub, 1994. 3. Rao, C.V., Kabaddi; Native Indian Sports, Patiala Nis Publisher, 1983. 4. Rao, E.P., Modern Coaching in Kabaddi D.U.S.Pub, 1994 69
  • 70. PAPER NO. – III (i) Module-I GAME OF SPECIALIZATION - KHO-KHOUNIT-I INTRODUCTION 1.1 Historical development of Kho-kho at national level 1.2 Modern trends and developments in Kho-kho 1.3 Organization of KKFI and the confederations 1.4 The congress, the board of administration, executive committee, the permanent secretariat, the internal auditors 1.5 Organization and constitution of KKFI and Affiliated UnitsUNIT-II RULES AND THEIR INTERPRETATIONS 2.1 Latest Rules, and their InterpretationsUNIT-III PREPARATION AND TRAINING 3.1 Prerequisites of preparation and training o Theory of Kho-kho training process o General & specific warming up and cooling down (specific exercises for Kho-kho) 3.2 Principles of warming up and cooling down and their effects 3.3 Basic skills and techniques o Running – chain game - single chain, double chain 3-3-2 o Feint o Dosing o Oval o Chasing – pole dive – sitting, running, fake and pole dive o Sitting and block o Dive – air dive, sitting dive, flat dive 3.4 Preparation, pre-contact movement, contact 3.5 Teaching progression 3.6 Coaching points 3.7 Tactical application 3.8 Drills for skill development (any five) 3.9 The court defense – general characteristics, teaching progression and coaching tips, position specific and other defense drills 3.10 Lead - up games for beginners in Kho-kho 3.11 Teaching of Kho-kho skill - preparing a lesson planUNIT-IV SPECIFIC TRAINING METHODS 4.1 Development of motor components with specific reference to Kho-kho 4.2 Development of Kho-kho specific fitness components 4.3 Specific training methods for different positionsUNIT-V MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION 5.1 Fitness tests 5.2 Skill tests 5.3 Evaluation of team performance – observation techniques, statistical techniques, scouting charts REFERENCESKho-Kho 1. Chakrabarty, G., Kho - Kho Aveloken, Delhi, Khel Sahitya Kendra, 2002. 2. Panday, L., Kho - Kho Sarvaswa, New Delhi Metropolitan, 1982. 70
  • 71. PAPER NO. – III (i) Module-I GAME OF SPECIALIZATION – TABLE TENNISUNIT-I HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT AND MODERN TRENDS IN TABLE TENNIS 1.1 Origin, historical perspectives and modern trends & development of Table Tennis 1.2 Structure and function of Table Tennis Federation of India (TTFI), International Table Tennis Federation (ITTF) and other associations 1.3 Orientation of the fundamental skills 1.4 Techniques and tactics 1.5 Individual and game strategiesUNIT-II TECHNICAL PREPARATION FOR TABLE TENNIS 2.1 Training of motor components 2.2 Technical preparation – reflexes, perceptual sense, neuro-muscular coordination 2.3 Construction and maintenance of Table Tennis hall, equipments etc. 2.4 Physical and physiological preparation 2.5 Psychological preparationUNIT-III SYSTEMATIZATION OF TRAINING PROCESS 3.1 Systematizing training process for Table Tennis players – general warming-up, specific warming-up and cooling-down 3.2 Supplementary exercises, basic skills, weight-training and circuit-training 3.3 Training for beginners 3.4 Training for intermediate players - advanced sportspersons 3.5 Training for seniors - high performance sportspersonsUNIT-IV SAFETY MEASURES, PREVENTION AND MANAGEMENT OF INJURIES 4.1 Prevention of injuries 4.2 Safety measures 4.3 Specific injuries in Table Tennis and their causes 4.4 Management of injuries 4.5 Rehabilitation of injured playersUNIT-V DIET, NUTRITION AND SPORTS PERFORMANCE 5.1 Meaning, definition, classification and components of nutrition 5.2 Energy requirements of Table Tennis players 5.3 Nutritional requirements of Table Tennis players : pre, during and post competition phases 5.4 Minerals 5.5 Sports drinks : pre, during and post competitionPRACTICALS 1. Demonstration of skills 2. Warming-up (general and specific), cooling down, and supplementary exercises 3. Training for foot work 4. Shadow practice and pressure training 5. Visit to a place where the facilities of Table Tennis exist REFERENCESTable Tennis 1. Jain, Deepak, Teaching and Coaching -Table Tennis, Delhi : Khel S.K., 2001. 2. Narang, P., Play & Learn Table Tennis, Khel Sahitaya Kendra, 2005. 3. Narang, P., Play and Learn Table Tennis, New Delhi: K.S.K, 2003. 4. Parker, D., Take Up Table Tennis, Springfield Books Ltd., 1989. 5. Simpson, Peter, Successful Table Tennis, London: Charles Letts, 1980. 6. Taylor, R., Sports Action-Table Tennis, London, 1989. 7. Thani, Lokesh, Skills and Tactics Table Tennis, Delhi: Sports, 1998. 71
  • 72. 72
  • 73. PAPER NO. – III (i) Module-I GAME OF SPECIALIZATION – VOLLEYBALLUNIT-I INTRODUCTION 1.1 Historical development of Volleyball at international and national level 1.2 Modern trends and developments in volleyball 1.3 Organization of FIVB and the confederation 1.4 The congress, the board of administration, executive committee, the international commissions, the Permanent Secretariat, the continental confederations, the internal auditors 1.5 Organization and constitution of VFI and state bodiesUNIT-II RULES AND THEIR INTERPRETATIONS 2.1 Latest rules, and their interpretationsUNIT-III PREPARATION AND TRAINING 3.1 Prerequisites of preparation and training Theory of volleyball training process General and specific warming up and cooling down (specific exercises for volleyball) Principles of warming up and cooling down and their effects 3.2 Basic skills and techniques o The serve – underhand, tennis, jump and serve, overhead float o Forearm passing o Overhead passing o Spiking / attack o Blocking • Preparation, pre-contact movement, contact • Teaching progression • Coaching points • Tactical application • Drills for skill development (any five) 3.3 The court defense – general characteristics, teaching progression and coaching tips, position specific and other defense drills 3.4 Lead - up games for beginners in volleyball 3.5 Teaching of volleyball skill - preparing a lesson planUNIT-IV SPECIFIC TRAINING METHODS 4.1 Development of motor components with specific reference to volleyball 4.2 Development of volleyball specific fitness components 4.3 Specific training methods for different positionsUNIT-V MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION 5.1 Fitness tests 5.2 Skill Tests – AAHPER, Rusell lunge, Brady volleyball tests 5.3 Evaluation of team performance – observation techniques, statistical techniques, scouting charts REFERENCESVolley Ball 1. American…. Program, Coaching Youth Volley Ball, Campaigon, H.K., 1996. 2. FIVB, Backcourt Spiking in Modern Volley Ball, Chennai : FIVB, 1996. 3. Saggar, S.K., Cosco Skills Stactics - Volley Ball, Delhi : Sport Publication, 1994. 4. Scates, A.E., Winning Volley Ball, WC Brown, 1993. 73
  • 74. PAPER NO. – III (i) Module-I GAME OF SPECIALIZATION – YOGAUNIT-I INTRODUCTION TO YOGA : 1.1 Meaning, definition and scope of yoga, limitations and misconceptions, importance of yoga in education and other fieldsUNIT-II PHILOSOPHICAL FOUNDATIONS OF YOGA : 2.1 Pre-vedic and Vedic period; upnishada, sutra period, patanjali yoga sutra; hatha yoga tantraUNIT-III SYSTEMATIZATION OF TRAINING PROCESS: 3.1 Asanas : padmasana, vajrasana, sidhasana, paschimottanasa, halasana, sarvangasana, shalabhasana, ardh-matsyendrasana, bhujangasana, tadasana, vrikshasana, matsyasana, gomukhasana, ushtrasana, shavasana, makarasana, vrishchikasana, dhanurasana, purna matsyendrasana, chakrasana, vatyayanasana, ek pad sikandasana, bakasana, mayurasana, shirshasana 3.2 Pranayam : anulom-vilom, bhastrika, naddi shodhan, sheetali, sheetkari, bhramari, ujjayi 3.3 Shatkarma : neti, dhauti, nauli, basti, kunjal, kapal bhati, shankh prakshalana 3.4 Bandhas : jalandhar, uddyana, mool bandhaUNIT-IV PREPARATION FOR COMPETITION : 4.1 Environment 4.2 Costume and dress 4.3 Systematic preparation for competition, sequence 4.4 Causes and remedies of injuries, physiotherapy, rehabilitation and massageUNIT-V SPORTS NUTRITION 5.1 Meaning, definition, classification and components of nutrition, nutrients 5.2 Yogic diet 5.3 Role of fluids - sports drinks & minerals etc. : pre, during and post competitionPRACTICALS 1. Prayer 2. Asanas, pranayama, shatkarma, bandha (as mentioned in theory) 3. Yoga-nidra/relaxation techniques 4. Visit to yoga centre REFERENCESYoga 1. Anand, Omprarkash. Yog Dawra Kaya Kalp, Kanpur, Sewasth Sahitya Perkashan, 2001. 2. Sarin, N., Yoga Dawara Ragoon Ka Upchhar, Khel Sahitya Kendra, 2003. 3. Sri, Swami Rama, Breathing, Rishikesh, Sadhana Mandir Trust, 2001. 4. Swami, Ram., Yoga & Married Life, Rishikesh Sadhana Mandir Trust, 2000. 5. Swami, Veda Bharti., Yoga, Polity, Economy and Family, Rishikesh Sadhana Mandir Trust, 2000. 74
  • 75. PAPER NO. – IV (i) Module-I SUBJECT SPECIALIZATIONCOURSE DESCRIPTION: The course provides an introduction to neuromuscular concepts, energymetabolism and hormonal control that occur in response to exercise. Emphasis is placed on the cardiorespiratory responses to exercise, environmental aspects of work performance, Special Population inexercise, optimizing performance and principles of exercise testing and prescription for the sedentary classand sports men. The course prepares students for teaching, training and research in exercise physiology.COURSE OBJECTIVES: 1. To understand the physiology of the neuromuscular response to exercise 2. To analyse the acute and chronic adaptation to exercise by various systems. 3. To explore the environmental considerations during work/ performance 4. To gain an understanding of role of exercise for Special Population 5. To understand the method of exercise testing and prescription for the sedentary class 6. To acquire knowledge of the protocols of physiological sport specific testing of players. 7. To learn the various aspects that contribute in optimizing fitness and performance 8. To gain lab experience that shall enforce and expand concepts addressed in the course. 75
  • 76. PAPER NO. – IV (i) Module-I SUBJECT SPECIALIZATION -EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGYUNIT-1 PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISING MUSCLE 1.1 (a) Structure and function of muscles: microscopic structure of the myofibril and contractile mechanism, chemical composition, molecular basis of contraction of skeletal muscle, fuel for muscular work. (b) Neural control of exercising muscle: - acute response and chronic adaptation, neuron, motor unit, neuromuscular junction, neuron –neural nerve to nerve synapse junction neural transmission and motor response 1.2 Fuel for Exercising Muscle: Metabolism and its physiological adaptation Metabolism and Bioenergetics (a) Aerobic and anaerobic components of physical activities/ sports (b) Primary energy scale. Metabolic adaptation to training (a) Metabolic adaptation to endurance training (b) Metabolic adaptation to strength /speed trainingUNIT-2 EXERCISE TRAINING 2.1 Principles of Exercise Training: • General training principles • Overtraining, detraining, retention of training effects. • Resistance training program • Aerobic and anaerobic training program • Role of Slow Twitch Fibre and Fast Twitch Fibre in sports. 2.2 Acute Response and Chronic Adaptation of the; • Cardiovascular System • Respiratory System • Musculo-skeletal system and other systemsUNIT-3 PRESCRIPTION OF EXERCISE FOR HEALTH AND FITNESS 3.1 Prerequisites for Exercise Prescription • Medical Clearance • Stop test indicators • Health Appraisal flow chart • Administrative guidelines for pre-testing situation 3.2 Formulation and guidelines of Exercise Program • Consent form • Steps for program formulation • Rationale for formulating an individualized exercise program • Protocol Guidelines • Monitoring exercise intensity • Administrative guidelines for testing situationUNIT-4 MUSCULAR FLEXIBILITY 4.1 Muscular flexibility for fitness and preventive health care • Importance of flexibility for sedentary, normal and active people • Factor affecting flexibility • Assessment of flexibility (lab and field methods) 76
  • 77. • Methods of developing flexibility. 4.2 Physiological approach to enhance flexibility. • Principles of developing flexibility • Preventing and rehabilitating low back painUNIT-5 PHYSIOLOGY OF HEALTH RELATED AND SKILL RELATED FITNESS . 5.1 Health Related Fitness • Components • Benefits • Development 5.2 Skill-Related Fitness • Components • Benefits • Development.PRACTICAL: 1. Assessment of resting physiological parameters- Heart rate, respiratory rate and blood pressure. 2. Assessment of flexibility (Lab and Field test) 3. Assessment of cardio respiratory fitness- Harvard step test, Cooper’s 12min run/walk. 4. Assessment of skill related fitness components 5. Assessing heart rate response to selected exercise (maximal and sub-maximal). 6. Assessment the steady state of oxygen consumption 7. Assessment anaerobic power. (Sargeant Jump). 8. Use of the Readiness to Exercise Questionnaire (PAR-Q) REFERENCES 1. Hoeger, Werner W.K, Hoegen,Sharon A. Principles and Labs for fitness and wellness. 7thed 2004. Thomson Warsworth. 2. Kang, Jie. Bioenergetics Primer for Exercise Science .2008. Human kinetics. 3. Richardson, Seano, Anderson, Mark B: Overtraining Athletes: Personal Journey in Sports.2008. Human Kinetics 4. Wilmore, Jack H and Costill, David L. Physiology of Sports and Exercise. Human kinetics. 1994. human kinetics 5. Wilmore, Jack H and Costill, David L.Kenny W. Physiology of Sports and Exercise. 4thed. 2008. Human kinetics 77
  • 78. PAPER NO. – IV (i) Module-I SUBJECT SPECIALIZATION - SPORTS BIO-MECHANICSUNIT - ITHE STUDY AND ANALYSIS OF HUMAN MOVEMENTKinesiology and Biomechanics:Areas of study,Approaches for studying movement,Importance of biomechanics in Physical Education and SportsResearch in and out of the LaboratoryINTRODUCTION TO BIOMECHANICS INSTRUMENTATIONOverview of instrumentation and its usesClocks and timesStroboscopyCinematography and computer assisted analysisVideography and computer assisted analysisForce measuring instrumentationAccelerometryElectorogoniometryElectromyographyUsing micro computers for collecting and analyzing dataUNIT-IILOOKING AT MOVEMENT: SOME MECHANICAL CONCEPTSTypes of motionDistance and DisplacementSpeed, Velocity and uniform accelerationAcceleration and uniform accelerationForce and momentumPressureMass and weightGravityCenter of gravityWorkPowerEnergyForces and MovementForces acting on a systemReaction forcesFriction forceCentripetal and centripetal forcesElastic forceInternal and external forcesMotive and Resistive forcesForce diagrams and VectorsTorque and moment of inertiaThe effect of two or more torques on a systemVector Composition of torqueTorque and the body’s center of gravity locationOther KineticsLever, types of levers and their mechanical advantage and disadvantage with special reference to physicaleducation and sports application.Friction, types of friction and their mechanical advantage and disadvantage with special reference tophysical education and sports application.UNIT-IIIBODY BALANCE AND STABILITY CONTROLBalanceEquilibrium and stabilityControlling balance in static positions 78
  • 79. Controlling balance during movementNEWTONS LAWS OF MOTIONLaw of Inertia (Linear Motion)Law of moment of Inertia (Angular Motion)Law of Momentum (Linear Motion)Law of Angular Momentum (Angular Motion)Law of Action and Reaction (Linear Motion)Law of Action and Reaction (Angular Motion)UNIT-4OBSERVING AND ANALYZING PERFORMANCEThe Nature of skillsOverall performance objective of skillThe analysis processProjectile – Related ActivitiesProperties of motion related to projecting for vertical distanceProjecting for vertical distance with a horizontal componentProjecting for horizontal distanceProjecting for accuracyPrinciples derived from Projectile MotionFLUID FORCESFluid drag forceFluid lift forceApplication of Arrangement in SportEffective of dragon the body and objects in sportEffects of life in sportLife force produced by spin: The Magnus effect.Application of Hydrodynamics in SwimmingBuoyancy & flotationResistive forces in swimming skillsPropulsive forces in swimming skillsSwimming speed & efficiencyUNIT-VSTRUCTURE OF MOTOR ACTIONStructure of cyclic & acidic motor action and movement combinationFunctional relationship of different phases of motor actionQualities of Motor MovementsMovement rhythmMovement couplingMovement flowMovement precisionMovement amplitudeBiomechanical principles:Principles of initial forcePrinciples of optimum path of accelerationPrinciples of conservation of momentum.Principles of Action and ReactionPRACTICAL 1. Development of a Velocity time graph from a cinematographically and/video system and/photo specially recorded sprint and / Vertical jump and / analysis movement. 2. Determination of centre of Gravity by Reaction Board Method. 3. Determination of centre of Gravity by Joint- point – method. 4. Determination of centre of Gravity of Main- point method. 5. Determination of combined center of Gravity (joint-point method). 6. Demonstration of the Principle conservation of Augular momentum. 79
  • 80. 7. Demonstration of Principle of action and reaction. 8. Biomechanical analysis of a given technique. (Qualitative) REFERENCES1. Atha, J., Current Research in Sports Biomechanics, Switzerland: Karger, 1987.2. Burstein, A.H & Wright, T, M., Fundamental of Orthopaedic Biomechanics, Baltimore : Williams & Wilkins, 1994.3. Gheluwe, B.N. and Atha, J. [Ed], Medicine & Sport Science: Current Research & Sports Biomechanics, London: Karger, 1987.4. Gowitzke, B.A. and Milner, M. (1988). Scientific Bases of Human Movement. (3rd. Ed.) Baltimore: Williams and Wilkins.5. Grabiner, M. D. Current Issues in Biomechanics, New Delhi, 1993.6. Grimshaw, Paul., Lees, Adrian., Flower, Neil.,&Burden, Adrian. Sports and Exercise Biomechanics. Taylor & Francis.7. Groves, R and Camaine, D. (1983). Concepts in Kinesiology. (2nd. Ed.). Philadelphia: Saunders College Publishing.8. Hall, S.J., Basic Biomechanics, London, Mosby, 1991.9. Hay, J. (1978). The biomechanics of sport techniques. (2nd. Ed.). Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall.10. Hay, J. & Reid, J. (1982). The Anatomical and Mechanical Bases of Human Motion. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall.11. Kreighbaum & Barthels, Biomechanics, NY: Macmillan, 1985.12. Luttegens, Kathryn., Deutsch, Helga., Hamilton, Nancy. Kinesiology-Scientific Basis of Human Motion. 8th Ed, Brown & Bench mark.13. Mood, S.D., Beyond Biomechanics, New York: Taylor, 1996.14. Nordin, M. & Frankel, V. (1990). Basic Biomechanics of the Musculoskeletal System, Philadelphia: Lea & Febiger.15. Northrip, J., Logan, G. & McKinney, W. (1983). Analysis of Sport Motion. (3rd. Ed). Dubuque: William C. Brown.16. Rasch, P. (1989). Kinesiology and Applied Anatomy. Philadelphia: Lea & Febiger.17. Shaw, D., Mechanical Basis of Biomechanics, Delhi : Sport Pub., 2000.18. Shaw, D., Mechanical Basis of Biomechanics, London : A&C, 2003.19. Shaw, D, Pedagogic Kinesiology, Khel Sahitya Kendra 2007.20. Thompson, C. (1985). Manual of Structural Kinesiology. (10th Ed.). St. Louis: Times Mirror/ Mosby College Publishing.21. Shaw, Dhanonjoy, Kinsiology and Biomechanics of Human Motion, Khel Sahitya Kendra, 1998. 80
  • 81. PAPER NO. – IV (i) Module-I SUBJECT SPECIALIZATION - EXERCISE & SPORT PSYCHOLOGYUNIT- I INTRODUCTION TO SPORT PSYCHOLOGY 1.1 Meaning & scope of sport psychology 1.2 Division of sport psychology 1.3 Landmarks in the development of exercise and sport psychology 1.4 Place of sport psychology in sports sciences hierarchy. 1.5 Importance of sport psychology to- - Teachers - Coaches and trainers - Sportspersons - Administrators 1.6 Methods of sport psychology - Observation - Introspection - Experimental - Clinical case study - Psychoanalysis - Interview - QuestionnaireUNIT-II LEARNING 2.1 Concept and meaning of learning 2.2 Types of learning 2.3 Theories of learning - Classical and operant conditioning - Information processing - Observational learning 2.4 Feed back –biofeedback, augmented (teacher) feedback 2.5 Motor-skill acquisition and factors affecting itUNIT-III GROWTH & DEVELOPMEMT 3.1 Concept of growth & development 3.2 Genetic & environmental influences on growth & development 3.3 Physical, mental, social and emotional characteristics of infants, children and adolescents 3.4 Ensuring wholesome growth through physical activityUNIT-IV MOTIVATION 4.1 Meaning and concept of motivation 4.2 Theories of motivation : internal process theories - drive, need, optimal arousal, and external process theories - incentive, expectancy theory 4.3 Perceived competence 4.4 Achievement motivation 4.5 Goal-setting in sportUNIT-V SENSORY, PERCEPTUAL AND COGNITIVE PROCESS 5.1 Meaning and concept of sensory, perceptual and cognitive processes 5.2 Theories of cognitive process 5.3 Factors affecting perception with special reference to physical activity 5.4 Thinking, imagination and memory 5.5 Action-regulation - meaning, mechanism, classification and stages 81
  • 82. REFERENCESPsychology 1. Aggarwal, J.C., Basic Ideas in Educational Psychology, Delhi: Sipra, 2003. 2. Bhatia, Hans Raj, Test Book of Educational Psychology, Delhi: Macmillan, 2003. 3. Cashmore, Ellis, Key Concepts in Sport Psychology, London, Routledge, 2004. 4. Cox, R. H., Sport Psychology Ed 5 Th., London, Mcgraw Hill, 2002. 5. Dewey, John, Psychology, New Delhi: K.S.K., 2003. 6. Jain, D., Introduction to Psychology, New Delhi: K.S.K., 2003. 7. Jain, Piyush and Tomar, C.S., History, Foundation of Physical Education and Educational Psychology, New Delhi, Friends, 2006. 8. Kamlesh, M.L, Educational Sport Psychology, New Delhi, Friends Pub., 2006. 9. Kamlesh, M.L., Key Ideas in Sport Psychology, New Delhi, Friends Pub., 2007. Kutty, S.K., Foundations of Sports & Exercise Psychology, New Delhi: Sports, 2004. 10. Levinthal, Charles F., Introduction to Physiological Psychology, N.D. Prentice Hall, 2005. 11. Seashore, C.E., Elementary Experiments in Psychology, ND: Sports Pub., 2001. 12. Shaw, D., An Encyclopedia of Test and Measurement in Sports Exercise Psychology, New Delhi, 2001. 13. Woodworth, R.S., Basic Facts in Psychology, ND: Sports Pub., 2001. 82
  • 83. PAPER NO. – IV (i) Module-I SUBJECT SPECIALIZATION - PROFESSIONAL PREPARATION AND CURRICULUM DESIGNOBJECTIVES • To develop an understanding of professional preparation in physical education. • To develop skills to meet professional requirements. • To understand the need for professional development. • To acquire skill and competencies for professional development. • To gain knowledge of curriculum development. • To acquire skill to analyze, develop and evaluate curriculum.FUNDAMENTALS OF PROFESSIONAL PREPARATIONUNIT-I HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE 1.1 Professional Preparation in India - Pre Independence perspective - Post Independence perspective 1.3 Comparative analysis of professional preparation program in U.S., Europe and ChinaUNIT-II PROFESSIONAL PREPARATION POLICY PERSPECTIVE 2.1 Role and responsibilities of Centre and State in the implementation of policies on education and physical education. 2.2 Compulsions and constrains affecting planning and implementation of educational policies and programs.UNIT-III PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND PROFESSIONALISM 3.1 Concept and meaning of Profession, Professional and Professionalism. 3.2 Physical education as a profession.UNIT-IV CAREER AVENUES & JOB OPPORTUNITIES IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION & SPORTS 4.1 Career avenues after under graduation and post graduation and research degrees. 4.2 Exploring and venturing into new avenues: challenges and opportunities in physical education 4.3 Inter-relationship among various careers in physical education and sports 4.4 Planning for a career : self-assessment, motivational dynamics, decision making, counseling and guidanceUNIT-V PROFESSIONAL PREPARATION PROGRAMMES 5.1 Foundation: need, objectives and characteristic of professional preparation programmes 5.2 Courses available in physical education and sports. 5.3 Level of study : undergraduate preparation, graduate study, post-graduate study, advance professional study 5.4 Laboratory experience, teaching practice, field work, non-curricular preparation 5.5 Role of physical education teacher and institutes in professional preparation programmesPRACTICALS : 1. Case study on national sports policy/national education policyREFERENCES 1. Adams William C. Foundation of Physical Education Exercise and Sports Sciences, Philadelphia, 1991 2. Gupta Rakesh, Sharma Akhilesh, and Sharma Santosh, Professional Preparation and Curriculum Design in Physical Education & sports Sciences, New Delhi, Friends Publications, 2004 3. Hoover. Kenneth H., The Professional Teacher’s Handbook, Boston, Allyn and Bacoon, 1972 4. Krik David, Physical Education and Curriculum Study, Kent, Croom Helm, 1988 5. Sandhu Kiran, Professional Preparation and Career Development in Physical Education, New Delhi, Friends Publications, 2004 6. Sandhu Kiran, Trends and Development in Professional Preparation in Physical Education, New Delhi, Friends Publication, 2006 7. Wessel Janet A, and Kelly Luke, Achievement-Based Curriculum Development in Physical Education, Philadepia, Lea and Febiger, 1986 8. Zeigler E.F, Professional and Scholarly Foundation of Physical Education and Kinesiology, Sports Educational Technologies, 2007 83
  • 84. PAPER NO. – IV (i) Module-I SUBJECT SPECIALIZATION - SPORT SOCIOLOGYUNIT-I INTRODUCTION TO SPORT SOCIOLOGY 1.1 Meaning and concept of sport sociology 1.2 Sports and society 1.3 Current status of sports sociology in India and abroad. 1.4 Sports sociology as a science of social relationships. (Structural and functional, conflict, critical, interactionary theories)UNIT-II SPORTS SOCIOLOGY THEORIES 2.1 Theories in sports sociology 2.2 Implications of social theories in sports 2.3 Comparative analysis of different theories of sport sociologyUNIT-III SOCIAL ROOTS OF SPORT IN ANCINT SOCIETY 3.1 Sports as man’s cultured heritage 3.2 Sport in ancient times - Greece and Rome 3.3 Spectacles and gladiator contests 3.4 Approach to sport and physical activity through ages in India and abroad. 3.5 Sports among various classes of different civilizationsUNIT-IV CHANGES IN SPORT IN MODERN SOCIETY 4.1 Emergence of modern sport 4.2 Traditional recreation to rational recreation 4.3 Industrial Revolution and changes in sport dynamics 4.4 Capitalistic and socialistic view - point on sport 4.5 Professionalism versus amateurism in sport 4.6 Commercialism in sportUNIT-V METHODS AND METHODOLGY 5.1 Research techniques in social sciences 5.2 Positivism and field research 5.3 Inductive and deductive methods. 5.4 Empirical and analytical techniques 5.5 Semiotics, and phenomenology, Hermeneutics 5.6 Identifying research problems in sport sociologyPRACTICALS AND ASSIGNMENTS 1. Social loafing scale and socioeconomic status scale 2. Prepare a paper on sports sociological work done in India by scrutinizing literature and compare and evaluate with the studies done at international level 3. Analyze the significant sports events in view of phenomenology, hermeneutics, semiotics etc 4. Evaluate current status and nature of sports among India and other countries REFERENCESSociology 1. Bhusan, V. and Sachdeva, An Introduction to Sociology, Delhi: Kitab, 2003. 2. IGNOU, The Study of Society - Understanding Sociology, Delhi - IGNOU, 2007. 3. Inkeles, A. Ed., What Is Sociology, ND : Prentice Hall, 1997. 4. Jain, Rachna, Sports Sociology, New Delhi: KSK, 2005. 5. Kanwal Jeet, S., Sport Sociology, ND : Friends Pub., 2000. 6. Mitchell, G.D. Ed., Dictionary of Sociology, U.K : Routledge, 1999. 7. Sharma, R. N, Urban Sociology, ND : Surjeet Pub., 1993. 8. Singh, Bhupinder, Sports Sociology, New Delhi : Friends, 2004. 9. Turner, B., Cambridge Dictionary of Sociology, U.K., Cambridge, U.N. Press., 2006 84
  • 85. 10. SPORT IN SOCIETY, ISSUES AND CONTROVERSIES by Joy. J. Coaplay. Mcgraw Hill International edition 199711. THE SOCIAL SIGNIFICANCE OF SPORT B.D.Mc Pherson, J.E.Curtis, and J.W. Loy Human Kinetics books Champaign Illinois U.S.A.198912. UNDERTAKING SPORT – AN INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIOLOGY AND CULTURAL ANALYSIS OF SPORT J.Hosue, A. Tomlinson, G. Whannel, Routbdge, New York 199913. SPORT AND SOCIAL SYSTEMS, A GUIDE TO THE ANALYSIS PROBLEMS LITRETURE by J.W. Loy, B.D. Mc pherson , G. Kenyon, Addison wesley publishing company Messachuslls 197814. WORLD WIDE TRENDS IN YOUTH SPORT, P.D. Knop, L.M. Engstrow, B. Sbisstadd M.R.Uleiss Human Kinetics 199615. POWER AND RADIOLOGY IN AMERICAN SPORT, A CRITICAL PERSPECTIVE, G.H Sege Human Kinetics 199816. SOCIOLOGY, THE BASICS by M.Abrow Roulledge London 200117. SAMAAJSHASTRA AVDHARANAAYE AUR SIDHAANT, Dr. J.P. Singh, Prentis Hall of India New Delhi 199918. SAMAAJSHASTRA KE SIDHAANT, Writer Vidhyabhushan, Dr. D.R. Sachdeva, Kitaab Mahal Ellahabad 197919. Sociology Basic concepts by H.K. Rawat, Rawat Publication 200720. Learning Experience in Sociology of Sport by Lusan L. Greendoefor, C.A. Hasbroob, Human Kinetics Books Champaign, Illions U.S.A. 199121. Moping Sense of Sports, by Ellis Cashmore Routeedge, New York, 200022. Dictionary of sociology, Penguine reference23. Social issues in Sports by Ronald B. Woods Human Kinetics 200724. Stanly eitzan and George H. Sage, Sociology of world American Sports, Bastow, M. A: W C B/Mcgraw Hill 199725. Sports in Contemporary Society: An ethnology worth publications, New York-200126. Sport and Society by N.I. panomaryow, progress publication Moscow-198127. Sport and Social Order: Contributions to the sociology of sports by Donald. W. Ball and John W. Joy, Addison Wesley Publishing company 197528. Sport and Politics- Edited by G. Redmond Human Kinetics publishers, In Champaign, Illinois 198629. Women in Sports, a selected biography by M. Shoebridge, Mansell publishing Ltd. London and New York 198730. Theory, Sport and Society by J. Maguire and K. Young JAI, Elsevier Ltd. 200531. Sport in South Asian Society Past and Present edited by B. Majuardar and J. A. Morgan Reutledge, New York and London 200532. Social aspect of Sport by E.E. Snyder and Prentis Hall Jersey 197833. Sports beyond the iron curtain by freeman. S. and Boyes R. London Protcus Publishing Company 198034. Sport Spectators by A. Gultmann Colombia University, New York 1986 85
  • 86. PAPER NO. – IV (i) Module-I SUBJECT SPECIALIZATION – SPORT MANAGEMENTBASICS OF SPORTS MANAGEMENTUNIT–I 1.1 Meaning and definition of sports management 1.2 Historical perspective of sports management in India 1.3 Nature and scope of sports management 1.4 Aims and objectives of sports managementUNIT-2 2.1 Guiding principles of sports management 2.2 Leaderships 2.3 Identification of resources 2.4 PlanningUNIT-3 3.1 Significance of sports management in present day world 3.2 International perspectives in sports management- China and India 3.3 Sports medicine 3.4 Sports coachesUNIT-4 4.1 Definition and meaning of planning 4.2 Need and importance of planning 4.3 Principal of planning 4.4 Steps involved in planning process.UNIT-5 5.1 Job specification of manager, physical educational professional 5.2 Career avenues and professional preparation 5.3 Doping 5.4 Press and electronic media REFERENCES Sport Management 1. Chakraborty, S. Sports Management Delhi, Sports Publications, 1998. 2. Kamlesh, M. L. Management Concept in Physical Education and Sport, New Delhi Metropolitan Book Co. Pvt. Ltd, 2000. 3. Roy, S.S. Sports Management Delhi, Friends Publications, 1995. 4. Sivia, G.S. Sports Management in Universities, New Delhi: A.I.U. Deen Dayal Upadhyaya Marg, 1991. 86
  • 87. SEMESTER-IIS. Paper Module Title of the PaperNo. No.1. I (ii) II Research Process and Statistical Techniques in Physical Education2. V Educational Technology and Pedagogy Techniques in Physical Education3. III (ii) II Game of Specialization (One to be selected from the list) 1. Athletics 2. Aquatics (Swimming, Diving & Water-polo) 3. Badminton 4. Basketball 5. Cricket 6. Football 7. Gymnastics 8. Handball 9. Hockey 10. Judo 11. Kabaddi 12. Kho-Kho 13. Aquatics (Swimming, Diving & Water-polo) 14. Table Tennis 15. Volleyball 16. Yoga4. IV (ii) II Subject Specialization (One to be selected from the list) 1. Exercise Physiology 2. Sport Biomechanics 3. Exercise & Sport Psychology 4. Professional Preparation & Curriculum Design 5. Sport Sociology 6. Sport Management 87
  • 88. PAPER NO. – I (ii) Module-II RESEARCH PROCESS AND STATISTICAL TECHNIQUES IN PHYSICAL EDUCATIONUNIT-I EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH 1.1 Scientific method and experimental research 1.2 Characteristics of experimental method 1.3 Experimental control 1.4 Experimental design Single group design Repeated measure design Static group comparison Random groups design Post-test only random group design Related groups design Rotation group design Factorial designUNIT-II AREAS OF RESEARCH 2.1 Research in exercise and sport physiology 2.2 Motor learning and motor control 2.3 Psychological studies 2.4 Bio mechanical research 2.5 Growth and development researchUNIT-III PREPARATION OF RESEARCH REPORT 3.1 Formulating and submitting research proposal 3.2 Organization of thesis report 3.3 Technical aspects of writing research report 3.4 Use of illustrative material 3.5 Considerations in writing report and abstractUNIT-IV PROBABILITY CURVE 4.1 Meaning and principles of normal curve 4.2 Binominal expansion and properties of normal curve 4.3 Comparison of various scalesUNIT-V RELATIONSHIP AND COMPARATIVE STATISTICS 5.1 Principles of relationship 5.2 Coefficient of correlation 5.3 Product moment correlation 5.4 t-ratio – independent and paired 5.5 ANOVA – one way and two way REFERENCES 1. Author’s guide: Research Methods applied to Health Physical and Recreation, Washington, D.C. 1991. 2. Best John & Kahni, J.V. Research in Education, New Delhi. Prentice Hall of India (Pvt.) Ltd., 1992. 3. Clarke, H.H., The Application of Measurement in Health and Physical Education, 1992. 4. Shaw, Dhananjoy., Fundamental statistics in physical Education & Sports sciences, sports Publication, 2007. 88
  • 89. PAPER NO. – V Module-II EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY AND PEDAGOGY TECHNIQUES IN PHYSICAL EDUCATIONOBJECTIVES - To understand teaching as a process. - To know and apply the knowledge of methods and techniques of teaching. - To develop lesson plan for different activities and population. - To get acquainted with the developmental aspects of motor and skill development. - To understand the use of technology in physical education. - To familiarize with the use of ICT in physical education.UNIT-I TEACHING PROCESS 1.1 Effective teaching and teacher responsibilities. 1.2 A review of methods of teaching. 1.3 Techniques of presentation and class management skills.UNIT-II PLANNING LESSON 2.1 Structure and stages of lesson plan 2.2 Preparing for a lesson plan 2.3 Finding material and tapping resources 2.4 Feed back: teachers self evaluation, student feed back on lesson content and lesson effectivenessUNIT-III DEVELOPMENTAL PROGRAM 3.1 Developmental curriculum 3.2 Physical education content 3.3 Movement skill development - Stability skills - Manipulative skills - Locomotor and non-locomotor skills 3.4 Developmental games, modified games, dance and gymnasticsUNIT-IV TECHNOLOGY IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND SPORTS 4.1 Initiating technology 4.2 Use of Audio/Video technology 4.3 Image analysis 4.4 Technological devices used in Physical activity, sports (adobe premier, underwater camera, various measuring tools, wind gauges, foul indicators, electronic gadgets, adobe Photoshop, Microsoft animation, laser beam technology, LCD display, software for different game and sports)UNIT-V USE OF ICT IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 5.1 Computer analysis instructional software - Assessing student learning - Using technology to improve instructional process - Use of World Wide Web 5.2 Power point presentation REFERENCES 1. Adams William C. Foundation of Physical Education Exercise and Sports Sciences, Philadelphia, 1991 2. Gupta Rakesh, Sharma Akhilesh, and Sharma Santosh, Professional Preparation and Curriculum Design in Physical Education & sports Sciences, New Delhi, Friends Publications, 2004 3. Hoover. Kenneth H., The Professional Teacher’s Handbook, Boston, Allyn and Bacoon, 1972 4. Krik David, Physical Education and Curriculum Study, Kent, Croom Helm, 1988 5. Sandhu Kiran, Professional Preparation and Career Development in Physical Education, New Delhi, Friends Publications, 2004 6. Sandhu Kiran, Trends and Development in Professional Preparation in Physical Education, New Delhi, Friends Publication, 2006 7. Wessel Janet A, and Kelly Luke, Achievement-Based Curriculum Development in Physical Education, Philadepia, Lea and Febiger, 1986 8. Zeigler E.F, Professional and Scholarly Foundation of Physical Education and Kinesiology, Sports Educational Technologies, 2007 89
  • 90. PAPER NO. – III (ii) Module-II GAME OF SPECIALIZATION – ATHLETICSFOCUSED ATHLETIC EVENTS:Running: Middle Distance, Long Distance, Cross Country, Race WalkingJumps: High Jump & Pole VaultThrows: Javelin & HammerUNIT-I TRAINING LOAD AND ADAPTATIONS 1.1 Important motor components 1.2 Structure and process of improvement in performance 1.3 Principles of training load and various training methods 1.4 Causes, symptoms and management of overloadUNIT-II TECHNICAL PREPARATION FOR FOCUSED ATHLETIC EVENTS 2.1 Motor abilities required 2.2 Technical preparation 2.3 Marking, construction and maintenance of track & field 2.4 Physical, physiological, psychological and sociological preparation of athletesUNIT-III COMPETITION PLANNING AND PERIODIZATION 3.1 Types of competition planning (long term & short term) and preparatory, competition and transition periods/season 3.2 Cyclic process of training : micro, meso and macro cycles of training 3.3 Preparation of training schedules 3.4 Tactical efficiencyUNIT-IV TEST, MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION 4.1 Physical fitness tests 4.2 Motor ability tests 4.3 Keeping performance recordUNIT-V TEACHING LESSONS 5.1 Means, methods and process of classroom teaching 5.2 Preparation of teaching lesson-plans : characteristics & principles 5.3 Stages of teaching 5.4 Use of teaching aidsPRACTICALS 1. Different techniques of specified events : running (middle distance, long distance, cross country race and walking); jumps (high jump & pole vault); throws (javelin & hammer) 2. Practical applications of tactics 3. Training means for development of strength, speed, endurance, flexibility, coordinative abilities 4. Observing and assessing the video/tournament recording/movie and preparing a report 5. Teaching lessons 90
  • 91. REFERENCESAthletics 1. Chauhan, B.S., Khel Jagat Mein Athletics, Jalandhar : A.P. Pub., 1999. 2. Evans, D.A., Teaching Athletics, London : Hodder, 1984. 3. Fox, E.L., Physiological Basis of Physical Education and Athletics, Brown Pub., 1989. 4. Frost, R.B. and others, Administration of Physical Education and Athletics, Delhi : Universal Book, 1992. 5. Gothi, Ekta, Teaching & Coaching Athletics, ND : Sport Pub., 1997. 6. Knight, T. and Troop, N., Sackville Illustrated Dictionary of Athletics, Jackvillie, 1988. 7. Knigt, T., Athletics, Backville Book, 1988. 8. Renwick, G.R., Play Better Athletics, Delhi: Sports Pub., 2001. 9. Shri Vastav, Abhay Kumar, Athletics, S & S Parkashan, 1997. 10. Singh, Granth, Track and Field Athletics, Delhi: Ashoka, 1998. 11. Thani, Lokesh., Skills and Tactics Track Athletics, Delhi : Sports Pub., 1995. 12. Thani, Y. ed., Encyclopedia of Athletics, Delhi, Gian Pub, 1991. 13. Turbbull, S., Sports Views Guide Athletics, London : David & Charles, 1989. 14. Warden, P., Take Up Athletics, Springfield Books Ltd., 1990. 15. Weaver, T., Personal Best : Athletics, London : Willionm Colliv ., 1988. 91
  • 92. PAPER NO. – III (ii) Module-II GAME OF SPECIALIZATION – AQUATICS (SWIMMING, DIVING & WATER-POLO)UNIT-I TRAINING LOAD AND ADAPTATIONS 1.1 Important motor components 1.2 Structure and process of improvement of performance 1.3 Principles of training load and various training methods 1.4 Causes, symptoms and management of overloadUNIT-II SCIENTIFIC APPLICATIONS FOR HIGH PERFORMANCE 2.1 Anatomical and physiological considerations 2.2 Biomechanical considerations 2.3 Psychological environment 2.4 Scientific research reviewsUNIT-III COMPETITION PLANNING AND PERIODIZATION 3.1 Long term and short term planning, main and build-up competitions 3.2 Cyclic process of training : micro, meso and macro cycles 3.3 Preparation of training schedules for all the three seasons 3.4 Tactical efficiencyUNIT-IV TEST, MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION 4.1 Fitness tests 4.2 Skill tests 4.3 Periodical assessment of performanceUNIT-V TEACHING LESSONS 5.1 Means, methods and process of classroom teaching 5.2 Preparation of teaching lesson-plans : characteristics & principles 5.3 Different stages/phases of technique learning/teaching, their applications and principles 5.4 Use of teaching aidsPRACTICALS 1. Practical applications of techniques and tactics 2. Training means for development and measurement of strength, speed, endurance, flexibility and coordinative abilities 3. Observing and assessing the video/tournament recording/movie and preparing a report 4. Teaching lessons REFERENCESAquatics 1. Jain, R., Play and Learn Swimming, New Delhi, Khel Sahitya Kendra, 2003. 2. Kumar, Naveen., Coaching Successfully, Sports Publication, Delhi 2002. 3. Nelson, R., Macnee, M.J.Ed., Olympic Fact book: A Spectators Guide to the Summer games, New York Visible, 1996. 4. Thani, Lokesh., Swimming, Delhi, Sports Publisher, 2000. 5. Thani, Lokesh., Skill & Tactics Swimming" Delhi, Sports Publication, 1995. 92
  • 93. PAPER NO. – III (ii) Module-II GAME OF SPECIALIZATION – BADMINTONUNIT-I TRAINING LOAD AND ADAPTATIONS 1.1 Important motor components 1.2 Structure and process for improvement of performance 1.3 Various training methods and principles of training load 1.4 Causes and symptoms of overload 1.5 Management of overloadUNIT-II SCIENTIFIC CONSIDERATIONS FOR HIGH PERFORMANCE 2.1 Anatomical considerations 2.2 Physiological considerations 2.3 Biomechanical considerations 2.4 Psychological consideration 2.5 Scientific research reviewsUNIT-III COMPETITION PLANNING AND PERIODIZATION 3.1 Long term and short term planning for competition 3.2 Cyclic process of training : micro, meso and macro cycles 3.3 Preparation of training schedules 3.4 Tactical efficiency 3.5 Build-up and main competitionsUNIT-IV TEST, MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION 4.1 Introduction, importance of test, measurement and evaluation in badminton 4.2 Fitness tests 4.3 Skill tests 4.4 Knowledge tests 4.5 Periodical assessment of performanceUNIT-V TEACHING LESSONS 5.1 Means & methods 5.2 Teaching lessons, process of classroom teaching 5.3 Preparation of teaching lesson-plans : characteristics & principles 5.4 Stages of teaching 5.5 Use of teaching aidsPRACTICALS1. Practical applications of tactics and strategies2. Training means for development and measurement of strength, speed, endurance, flexibility and coordinative abilities3. Observing and assessing the video/tournament recording/movie and preparing a report4. Teaching lessons REFERENCESBadminton 1. Ashok Kumar, Badminton, New Delhi Discovery., 2003. 2. Ballou, Palph B., Teaching Badminton, India, 1982. 3. Bloss, M.V & Hales, R.S., Badminton, WC Brown, 1994. 4. Davis, Pat, Badminton, S.A. David & Charles Inc., 1988. 5. Downey, J., How to Coach Badminton, London: Collins Pub., 1990. 6. Jain, Deepak, Teaching and Coaching –Badminton, Delhi : Khel S.K., 2001. 7. Kumar, Ashok, Badminton, Delhi : Discovery Pub., 1999. 8. Narang, P., Play and Learn Badminton, Khel Sahitaya Kendra, 2005. 9. Singh, M.K., A to Z Badminton, New Delhi, Friends Pub., 2006. 10. Singh, M.K., Comprehensive Badminton, N.D. Friends Pub., 2007. 93
  • 94. 11. Talbot, Derlk, Top Coach Badminton, Britain : Q.A. Press, 1989. 94
  • 95. PAPER NO. – III (ii) Module-II GAME OF SPECIALIZATION – BASKETBALLUNIT-I COACHING PHILOSOPHY 1.1 Principles and objectives of coaching 1.2 Techniques of coaching – pep talk, coaching- pre match, during and post match, individual and group coaching 1.3 Coaching schedule – seasonal, daily, weekly, monthly and yearly 1.4 Talent identification to select the winning combination – the offense and the defense 1.5 Team building 1.6 Coaching lesson planUNIT-II COMPETITION PLANNING 2.1 Long - term and short - term preparation for the decisive basketball competitions 2.2 Psychological qualities and preparation of a basketball player 2.3 Team system and tactical training Offensive system in play Defense system in play Dribbling and shooting pattern Individual , group and team tactics 2.4 Diet and nutrition for a basketball player 2.5 The coordination among the coach, doctor, psychologist and the playersUNIT-III SCIENTIFIC APPLICATIONS 3.1 Anthropometrical and physiological considerations 3.2 Biomechanical analysis of skillsUNIT-IV TRAINING LOAD AND ADAPTATION 4.1 Principles of load and adaptation 4.2 Fatigue, recovery and super compensation 4.3 Overload and its managementUNIT-V INJURIES IN BASKETBALL 5.1 Ankle sprain, jammed thumb, shoulder dislocation, wrist twist, rib injuries 5.2 Preventive and safety measures 5.3 RehabilitationPRACTICAL 1. Scouting for various teams o Direct scouting o Indirect scouting 2. Officiating practice 3. Assisting the physiotherapy department in injury management REFERENCESBasket Ball 1. Ambler, V., How to Play Basket Ball, Delhi : Paper Balls, 1984. 2. Pruitt, Jim, Play Better Basket Ball, Great Britain: Matchplan Books, 1983. 3. Prutti, Jim, Play Better Basket Ball, Matchplay Books, 1984. 4. Thani, Lokesh, Skills & Tactics of Basket Ball, ND : Sport Pub., 1995. 5. Nat B. B Conditioning Coaches Association, NBA Power Conditioning, Human Kinetics, 1997 6. Jain, Naveen Play and Learn Basket Ball, Khel Sahitya Kendra, New Delhi-2003 7. Sharma O.P. Basket Ball Skills and Rules, Khel Sahitya Kendra Delhi-2003 8. Thani, Yograj, Coaching Successfully Basket Ball, Sports Publisher, Delhi-2002 95
  • 96. PAPER NO. – III (ii) Module-II GAME OF SPECIALIZATION – CRICKETUNIT-I COACHING PHILOSOPHY 1.1 Principles and objectives of coaching 1.2 Techniques of coaching – pep talk, coaching- pre-match, during and post-match, individual and group coaching 1.3 Coaching schedule – seasonal, daily, weekly, monthly and yearly 1.4 Talent-identification to select the winning combination 1.5 Team building 1.6 Coaching lesson planUNIT- II COMPETITION PLANNING 2.1 Long-term and short-term preparation for the decisive cricket competitions 2.2 Psychological qualities and preparation of a cricketer 2.3 Team system and tactical training • Offensive system in play • Defense system in play • Individual group and team tactics 2.4 Diet and nutrition for a cricketer 2.5 The coordination among the coach, doctor, psychologist and playersUNIT-III SCIENTIFIC APPLICATIONS 3.1 Anthropometrical and physiological considerations 3.2 Biomechanical analysis of skillsUNIT-IV TRAINING LOAD AND ADAPTATION 4.1 Principles of load and adaptation 4.2 Fatigue, recovery and super-compensation 4.3 Overload and its managementUNIT-V INJURIES IN CRICKET 5.1 Ankle sprain, finger injuries, shoulder dislocation, knee displacement, rotator’s cuff 5.2 Preventive and safety measures 5.3 RehabilitationPRACTICALS 1. Practical efficiency in performance & demonstration of different advanced techniques Basic Skills and Techniques: Batting - forward defense, backward defense, all types of drives, glance, cut, pull, sweep a. Bowling - medium pace, leg spin, off spin and their improvisation b. Fielding - catching, ground fielding, close and deep fielding c. Wicket-keeping 2. Practical application of different tactics 3. Test, measurement & evaluation (a) Skill tests (throwing ability, running between wicket, target hitting) (b) Tests for different fitness components 4. Coaching lesson - 5 (five) internal lessons 96
  • 97. REFERENCESCricket 1. Aibara, E.B., Cricket, Delhi : National Museum, 1993. 2. Amarnath, Mohinder, Learn to Play Good Cricket, ND : Ubspd, 1996. 3. Andrew, K., Handbook of Cricket, England : Perlham Book, 1989. 4. Brown, The Pictorial History of Cricket, Hong Kong, 1988. 5. Chugh, G.D., Laws of Cricket, N.D. D.V.S.Pub., 1993. 6. Dellor, R., How to Coach Cricket, London: Mandola, 1990. 7. Jain, R., Play and Learn Cricket, New Delhi: K.S.K, 2003. 8. Kutty, S. K., Fielding Drills in Cricket, New Delhi: K.S.K, 2003. 9. Morrison, I., How to Play Cricket, Competition R. Pri. Ltd., 1993. 10. Rachna, Coaching Successfully: Cricket, Delhi: Sports, 2002. 11. Rachna, Jain, Play & Learn Cricket, Khel Sahitaya Kendra, 2005. 12. Rice P., How to Play Cricket, London: Guinness, 1988. 13. Sharangpani, R.C., Fitness Training in Cricket, Bombay : Marine Sports, 1992. 14. Sharma, Prahlad, Cricket, Jaipur: Shyam Prakashan, 2003. 15. Swpnronobe, E.W., Barclayas World of Cricket, London, Willow Book, 1986. 16. Thani, Vivek, Coaching Cricket, ND: Khel Sahitya, 1998. 17. Thasi, Y. [ed.], The Encyclopedia of Cricket, New Delhi, 1991. 18. Vic Marks, The Test Country Cricket Board Guide to Better Cricket, London, 1987. 19. Willis, Cricket, India, 1987. 97
  • 98. PAPER NO. – III (ii) Module-II GAME OF SPECIALIZATION – FOOTBALLUNIT-I COACHING PHILOSOPHY 1.1 Principles and objectives of coaching 1.2 Techniques of coaching – pep talk, coaching- pre match, during and post match, individual and group coaching 1.3 Coaching schedule – seasonal, daily, weekly, monthly and yearly 1.4 Talent identification to select the winning combination – the offense and the defense 1.5 Team building 1.6 Coaching lesson planUNIT-II COMPETITION PLANNING 2.1 Long - term and short - term preparation for the decisive football competitions 2.2 Psychological qualities and preparation of a football player 2.3 Team system and tactical training • Offensive system in play • Defense system in play • Dribbling and reception pattern • Individual , group and team tactics 2.4 Diet and nutrition for a football player 2.5 The coordination among the coach, doctor, psychologist and the playersUNIT-III SCIENTIFIC APPLICATIONS 3.1 Anthropometrical and physiological considerations 3.2 Biomechanical analysis of skillsUNIT-IV TRAINING LOAD AND ADAPTATION 4.1 Principles of load and adaptation 4.2 Fatigue, recovery and super – compensation 4.3 Overload and its managementUNIT-V INJURIES IN FOOTBALL 5.1 Ankle sprain, finger injuries, shoulder dislocation, knee displacement and head injuries 5.2 Preventive and safety measures 5.3 RehabilitationPRACTICAL1. Tackling the ball – basic, slide, shoulder charge2. Feinting – with the ball, without the ball, with an opponent behind and alongside the dribble3. Correct skill of throw in – throwing a ball, faults occurring, required instruction4. Goal keeping - throwing a ball with one hand, rolling the ball along the ground, ground kick, air kick5. Penalty kick REFERENCESFootball 1. Lau, S.K., Encyclopedia of Football, Delhi : Sport Pub., 1995. 2. N. Kumar, Play and Learn Football, New Delhi : K.S.K, 2003. 3. Reilly, T., Science and Football, London: E.N. Sport Ltd., 1988. 4. Sharma, O.P., Teaching and Coaching –Football, Delhi : Khel S.K., 2001. 5. Shellito, K., Personal Best Football, London: William Collins & Sons, 1988. 6. Thani, Yograj, Coaching Successfully Football, New Delhi: K.S.K, 2002. 7. Williams, J., The Roots of Football, London, 1988. 8. Wirhed, R., Training to Win Football, Europ : Wolfe Pub., 1992. 98
  • 99. 99
  • 100. PAPER NO. – III (ii) Module-II GAME OF SPECIALIZATION – GYMNASTICSUNIT-I PSYCHOLOGICAL PREPARATION AND CHILDREN TRAINING IN GYMNASTICS 1.1 Psychological preparation of a gymnast Principles and methods of development of mental pre-requisite for training Mental preparation for competition Mental training during competition Attention and its role in gymnastics 1.2 Children training in gymnastics Aims and objectives Principles and procedure of training Construction of an exercise/routines for various levels of competitionsUNIT-II SPORTS NUTRITION 2.1 Nutrition in gymnastics Meaning, definition and classification of nutrition Basic components of nutrition Energy requirements and body composition in gymnastics Role of diet in pre-competition, during competition and off-session phases 2.2 Fluid and its role in gymnastics Pre-session In-session During competition Off-sessionUNIT-III WORLD GYMNASTICS PARTICIPATION GUIDELINES AND REGULATIONS 3.1 World Gymnasstrada participation guidelines The meaning of World Gymnasstrada The goals of World Gymnasstrada World Gymnasstrada as an inducement for purposeful national federation activities World Gymnasstrada programmed Training of instructors for World Gymnasstrada participation Safety – physiological and morpho-functional aspect, technical aspect, aspect of direct assistance (spotting) 3.2 World Gymnasstrada regulations (Application- World Gymnasstrada - objectives, powers, implementation, scope and programme, participation and registration, facilities and scheduling, general organisation, finance, complementary events, conducting provisions)UNIT-IV DEVELOPMENT OF CODE OF POINTS AND EVALUATION OF DEGREE OF DIFFICULTY 4.1 Development of code of conduct of point : rhythmic gymnastics, sports aerobics, trampoline gymnastics, sports acrobatic Qualifications, rights and duties of president of MTC, TC members, chair of the jury, judges for Jury A, technical assistant, judges of Jury B, team judges and service personnel Generalities of evaluation of exercises 4.2 Evaluation of degree of difficulty in rhythmic gymnastics, sports aerobic gymnastics, trampoline gymnastics, sports acrobatic gymnasticsUNIT-V THEORY OF: 5.1 Sports Aerobics Gymnastics Group-A : Dynamic strength 100
  • 101. Group-B : Static strength Group-C : Jumps and leaps Group-D : Balance and flexibility 5.2 Sports Acrobatic Gymnastics Mixed Men double Women double Quadrapt – four men 5.3 Professional preparation in Gymnastics Outline a proposal of starting gymnastics in school, college and club Prepare a detailed orientation/clinic/workshop in gymnastics 5.4 Teaching lessons (preparation, stages of teaching and use of teaching aids)PRACTICAL 1. Sports Aerobics Gymnastics Group-A : Dynamic strength Group-B : Static strength Group-C : Jumps and leaps Group-D : Balance and flexibility 2. Sports Acrobatic Gymnastics Mixed Men double Women double Quadrapt – four men 3. Assignment/Project Professional preparation in gymnastics o Outline a proposal of starting gymnastics in school, college and club o Prepare a detailed orientation/clinic/workshop in gymnastics Observing and assessing the video/tournament recording/movie and preparing a report 4. Teaching lessons (preparation, stages of teaching and use of teaching aids) REFERENCESGymnastics 1. Chakraborty, S. and Sharma, Lalit, Fundamental of Gymnastics, N.D. D.V.S. Pub., 1995. 2. Chakraborty, S., Fundamental of Gymnastics, New Delhi: DVS Pub, 1995. 3. Chakraborty, S., Womens Gymnastics, Delhi : Friends Pub., 1998. 4. Code of Points Trampoline Gymnastics, Federation Int. De Gymnasics, 2005. 5. Derry, G., Personal Best Gymnastics, London : Willionm Colliv ., 1988. 6. Federation Internationale Gymnastics, Federation Int. De Gymnasics, 2006. 7. Harvey, F.J., Physical Exercises & Gymnastics, ND: Khel Sahitya, 1998. 8. Jain, R., Play and Learn Gymnastics, Khel Sahitaya Kendra, 2005. 9. Jain, R., Play and Learn Gymnastics, New Delhi: K.S.K, 2003. 10. Pearson, D., Play The Game Gymnastics, Britain : Ward Lock, 1991. 11. Smither, Graham, Behing The Scence of Gymnastics, London, 1980. 12. Turoff, Fred, Artistic Gymnastics, U.S.A : C. Brown, 1991. 101
  • 102. PAPER NO. – III (ii) Module-II GAME OF SPECIALIZATION – HANDBALLUNIT-I COACHING PHILOSOPHY 1.1 Principles and objectives of coaching 1.2 Techniques of coaching – pep talk, coaching- pre match, during and post match, individual and group coaching 1.3 Coaching schedule – seasonal, daily, weekly, monthly and yearly 1.4 Talent identification to select the winning combination – the offense and the defense 1.5 Team building 1.6 Coaching lesson planUNIT-II COMPETITION PLANNING 2.1 Long-term and short-term preparation for the decisive handball competitions 2.2 Psychological qualities and preparation of a handball player 2.3 Team system and tactical training • Offensive system in play • Defense system in play • Individual , group and team tactics 2.4 Diet and nutrition for a handball player 2.5 The coordination among the coach, doctor, psychologist and playersUNIT-III SCIENTIFIC APPLICATIONS 3.1 Anthropometrical and physiological considerations 3.2 Biomechanical analysis of skillsUNIT-IV TRAINING LOAD AND ADAPTATION 4.1 Principles of load and adaptation 4.2 Fatigue, recovery and super compensation 4.3 Overload and its managementUNIT-V INJURIES IN HANDBALL 5.1 Ankle sprain, finger injuries, shoulder dislocation, knee displacement, rotator’s cuff 5.2 Preventive and safety measures 5.3 Rehabilitation REFERENCESHandball 1. Jain, D., Play & Learn Handball, New Delhi, Khel Sahitya Kendra, 2003. 2. Kumar Ashok, Handball, New Delhi, Discovery Publishing House, 1999. 3. Lohar, A.R., Handball Basic Technology Bombay, The Marine Sports Publishing Division, 1998. 4. Schmottlach, N., Mcmanama, J., Physical Education Handbook. 9th Edition, London, Allyn & Bacon, 1997. 102
  • 103. PAPER NO. – III (ii) Module-II GAME OF SPECIALIZATION – HOCKEYUNIT-I COACHING PHILOSOPHY 1.1 Principles and objectives of coaching 1.2 Techniques of coaching – pep talk, coaching- pre-match, during and post match, individual and group coaching 1.3 Coaching schedule – seasonal, daily, weekly, monthly and yearly 1.4 Talent - identification to select the winning combination – the offense and the defense 1.5 Team – building 1.6 Coaching lesson planUNIT-II COMPETITION PLANNING 2.1 Long - term and short term preparation for the decisive hockey competitions 2.2 Psychological qualities and preparation of a hockey player 2.3 Team system and tactical training • Offensive system in play • Defense system in play • Hitting and receiving pattern • Individual , group and team tactics 2.4 Diet and nutrition for a hockey player 2.5 Coordination among team management personnel - the coach, doctor, psychologist, coach and the playersUNIT-III SCIENTIFIC APPLICATIONS 3.1 Anthropometrical and physiological considerations 3.3 Biomechanical analysis of skillsUNIT-IV TRAINING LOAD AND ADAPTATION 4.1 Principles of load and adaptation 4.2 Fatigue, recovery and super – compensation 4.3 Overload and its managementUNIT-V INJURIES IN HOCKEY 5.1 Ankle sprain, shoulder dislocation, knee displacement, cuts 5.2 Preventive and safety measures 5.3 RehabilitationPRACTICALS 1. Tackling– basic, slide 2. Feinting – with the ball, with an opponent behind and alongside the dribble 3. Goal keeping 4. Penalty kick REFERENCESHockey 1. Dubey, H.C. Hockey, New Delhi, Discovery Publishing House, 1999 2. International Hockey Federation, Rules of the Game of Hockey with Guidance for Players and Umpires. India, International Hockey Federation, 2003. 3. Jain, D., Hockey Skills & Rules New Delhi, khel Sahitya Kendra, 2003. 4. Narang, P., Play & Learn Hockey, Khel Sahitya Kendra, New Delhi, 2003 5. Thani Yograj., Coaching Successfully Hockey, Delhi, Sports Publication, 2002. 103
  • 104. PAPER NO. – III (ii) Module-II GAME OF SPECIALIZATION – JUDOUNIT-I TRAINING LOAD AND ADAPTATIONS 1.1 Important motor components 1.2 Structure and process of improvement of performance 1.3 Principles of training load and various training methods 1.4 Causes, symptoms and management of overloadUNIT-II SCIENTIFIC CONSIDERATIONS FOR HIGH PERFORMANCE 2.1 Anatomical and physiological considerations 2.2 Biomechanical considerations 2.3 Psychological considerations 2.4 Scientific research reviewsUNIT-III COMPETITION PLANNING AND PERIODIZATION 3.1 Long term and short term panning, main and build-up competitions 3.2 Cyclic process of training : micro, meso and macro cycles 3.3 Preparation of training schedules 3.4 Tactical efficiencyUNIT-IV TEST, MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION 4.1 Fitness tests 4.2 Skill tests 4.3 Knowledge tests 4.4 Assessment of performance for better efficiency or performance analysisUNIT-V TEACHING LESSONS 5.1 Means, methods and process of classroom teaching 5.2 Preparation of teaching lesson-plans : characteristics and principles 5.3 Different stages/phases of technique learning/teaching, their applications and principles 5.4 Use of teaching aidsPRACTICALS 1. Practical applications of techniques and tactics 2. Training means for development and measurement of strength, speed, endurance, flexibility and coordinative abilities 3. Observing and assessing the video/tournament recording/movie and preparing a report 4. Teaching lessons REFERENCESJudo 1. Caffary, B., Skilful Judo, London : A & C Black, 1992. 2. Dando, J., Play The Game Judo, Great Britain: Blandford, 1994. 3. Harrison, E.J., Coaching Successfully Judo, Delhi: Sports, 2002. 4. Harrison, J., Teaching & Coaching Judo, ND: Sport Pub., 1998. 5. Holme, P., Get to Gripe With Judo, London : Blandford, 1995. 6. Holme, Peter, Competition Judo, London: Ward Lock, 1996. 7. Jain, D., Play and Learn Judo, New Delhi : K.S.K, 2003. 8. Kumar, Mukesh, Action Judo, Delhi : Sport Publication, 1994. 9. Marwood, D., Critical Judo, ND : A.I.T.B.S. Pub., 1995. 104
  • 105. PAPER NO. – III (ii) Module-II GAME OF SPECIALIZATION – KABADDIUNIT-I COACHING PHILOSOPHY 1.1 Principles and objectives of coaching 1.2 Techniques of coaching – pep talk, coaching- pre match, during and post match, individual and group coaching 1.3 Coaching schedule – seasonal, daily, weekly, monthly and yearly 1.4 Talent- identification to select the winning combination – the offense and the defense 1.5 Team building 1.6 Coaching - lesson planUNIT-II COMPETITION PLANNING 2.1 Long - term and short term preparation for the decisive Kabaddi competitions 2.2 Psychological qualities and preparation of a Kabaddi player 2.3 Team system and tactical training Offensive system in play Defense system in play Raid and save pattern Individual, group and team tactics 2.4 Diet and nutrition for a Kabaddi player 2.5 The coordination among the coach, doctor, psychologist and playersUNIT-III SCIENTIFIC APPLICATIONS 3.1 Anthropometrical and physiological considerations 3.2 Biomechanical analysis of skillsUNIT-IV TRAINING LOAD AND ADAPTATION 4.1 Principles of load and adaptation 4.2 Fatigue, recovery and super – compensation 4.3 Overload and its managementUNIT-V INJURIES IN KABADDI 5.1 Ankle sprain, foot injuries, shoulder dislocation, knee displacement, wrist displacement 5.2 Preventive and safety measures 5.3 Rehabilitation REFERENCESKabaddi 1. Rao, C. V., Kabaddi, New Delhi: Oxford Press, 1982. 2. Rao, E.P., Modern Coaching in Kabaddi, D.V.S.Pub, 1994. 3. Rao, C.V., Kabaddi; Native Indian Sports, Patiala Nis Publisher, 1983. 4. Rao, E.P., Modern Coaching in Kabaddi D.U.S.Pub, 1994 105
  • 106. PAPER NO. – III (ii) Module-II GAME OF SPECIALIZATION – KHO-KHOUNIT-I COACHING PHILOSOPHY 1.1 Principles and objectives of coaching 1.2 Techniques of coaching – pep talk, coaching- pre match, during and post match, individual and group coaching 1.3 Coaching schedule – seasonal, daily, weekly, monthly and yearly 1.4 Talent identification to select the winning combination – the offense and the defense 1.5 Team building 1.6 Coaching lesson planUNIT-II COMPETITION PLANNING 2.1 Long-term and short - term preparation for the decisive volleyball competitions 2.2 Psychological qualities and preparation of a volleyball player 2.3 Team system and tactical training Offensive system in play Defense system in play Individual, group and team tactics 2.4 Diet and nutrition for a Kho-kho player 2.5 Coordination among the coach, doctor, psychologist and playersUNIT-III SCIENTIFIC APPLICATIONS 3.1 Anthropometrical and physiological considerations 3.2 Biomechanical analysis of skillsUNIT-IV TRAINING LOAD AND ADAPTATION 4.1 Principles of load and adaptation 4.2 Fatigue, recovery and super compensation 4.3 Overload and its managementUNIT-V INJURIES IN KHO-KHO 5.1 Ankle sprain, shoulder dislocation, knee displacement 5.2 Preventive and safety measures 5.3 Rehabilitation REFERENCESKho-Kho 1. Chakrabarty, G., Kho - Kho Aveloken, Delhi, Khel Sahitya Kendra, 2002. 2. Panday, L., Kho - Kho Sarvaswa, New Delhi Metropolitan, 1982. 106
  • 107. PAPER NO. – III (ii) Module-II GAME OF SPECIALIZATION – TABLE-TENNISUNIT-I TRAINING LOAD AND ADAPTATIONS 1.1 Important motor components 1.2 Structure and process for improvement of performance 1.3 Various training methods and principles of training load 1.4 Causes and symptoms of overload 1.5 Management of overloadUNIT-II SCIENTIFIC CONSIDERATIONS FOR HIGH PERFORMANCE 2.1 Anatomical considerations 2.2 Physiological considerations 2.3 Biomechanical considerations 2.4 Psychological consideration 2.5 Scientific research reviewsUNIT-III COMPETITION PLANNING AND PERIODIZATION 3.1 Long term and short term planning for competition 3.2 Cyclic process of training : micro, meso and macro cycles 3.3 Preparation of training schedules 3.4 Tactical efficiency 3.5 Build-up and main competitionsUNIT-IV TEST, MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION 4.1 Introduction, importance of test, measurement and evaluation in Table Tennis 4.2 Fitness tests 4.3 Skill tests 4.4 Knowledge tests 4.5 Periodical assessment of performanceUNIT-V TEACHING LESSONS 5.1 Means & methods 5.2 Teaching lessons, process of classroom teaching 5.3 Preparation of teaching lesson-plans : characteristics & principles 5.4 Stages of teaching 5.5 Use of teaching aidsPRACTICALS 1. Practical applications of tactics and strategies 2. Training means for development and measurement of strength, speed, endurance, flexibility and coordinative abilities 3. Observing and assessing the video/tournament recording/movie and preparing a report 4. Teaching lessons REFERENCESTable Tennis 1. Jain, Deepak, Teaching and Coaching -Table Tennis, Delhi : Khel S.K., 2001. 2. Narang, P., Play & Learn Table Tennis, Khel Sahitaya Kendra, 2005. 3. Narang, P., Play and Learn Table Tennis, New Delhi: K.S.K, 2003. 4. Parker, D., Take Up Table Tennis, Springfield Books Ltd., 1989. 5. Simpson, Peter, Successful Table Tennis, London : Charles Letts, 1980. 6. Taylor, R., Sports Action-Table Tennis, London, 1989. 7. Thani, Lokesh, Skills and Tactics Table Tennis, Delhi: Sports, 1998 107
  • 108. PAPER NO. – III (ii) Module-II GAME OF SPECIALIZATION – VOLLEYBALLUNIT-I COACHING PHILOSOPHY 1.1 Principles and objectives of coaching 1.2 Techniques of coaching – pep talk, coaching- pre match, during and post match, individual and group coaching 1.3 Coaching schedule – seasonal, daily, weekly, monthly and yearly 1.4 Talent identification to select the winning combination – the offense and the defense 1.5 Team building 1.6 Coaching lesson planUNIT-II COMPETITION PLANNING 2.1 Long - term and short - term preparation for the decisive volleyball competitions 2.2 Psychological qualities and preparation of a volleyball player 2.3 Team system and tactical training Offensive system in play Defense system in play Service and reception pattern Individual, group and team tactics 2.4 Diet and nutrition for a volleyball player 2.5 Coordination among the coach, doctor, psychologist and playersUNIT-III SCIENTIFIC APPLICATIONS 3.1 Anthropometrical and physiological considerations 3.2 Biomechanical analysis of skillsUNIT-IV TRAINING LOAD AND ADAPTATION 4.1 Principles of load and adaptation 4.2 Fatigue, recovery and super compensation 4.3 Overload and its managementUNIT-V INJURIES IN VOLLEYBALL 5.1 Ankle sprain, finger injuries, shoulder dislocation, knee displacement 5.2 Preventive and safety measures 5.3 Rehabilitation REFERENCESVolley Ball 1. American…. Program, Coaching Youth Volley Ball, Campaigon, H.K., 1996. 2. FIVB, Backcourt Spiking in Modern Volley Ball, Chennai : FIVB, 1996. 3. Saggar, S.K., Cosco Skills Stactics - Volley Ball, Delhi : Sport Publication, 1994. 4. Scates, A.E., Winning Volley Ball, WC Brown, 1993. 108
  • 109. PAPER NO. – III (ii) Module-II GAME OF SPECIALIZATION – YOGAUNIT-I SCHOOLS OF YOGA : 1.1 Ashtanga yoga, hatha yaga, laya yoga, mantra yoga, bhakti yoga, karma yoga, jan yoga, raj yogaUNIT-II PATANJALI ASHTANGA YOGA : 2.1 Bahiranga yoga : yama, niyama, asana, pranayama, pratyahara 2.2 Antaranga yoga: dharna, dhyana, samadhiUNIT-III APPLIED ASPECTS OF YOGA : 3.1 Yoga and sport 3.2 Yoga and research 3.3 Yoga in external climatic conditionsUNIT-IV YOGA AND HEALTH : 4.1 Corporate yoga 4.2 Yoga for healthy lifestyle 4.3 Common diseases and their yogic treatmentUNIT-V TEACHING LESSONS : 5.1 Yoga – teaching methodology 5.2 Teaching practice, techniques and modules 5.3 Preparing teaching lessons in yogaPRACTICALS 1. Repetition of syllabus of Semester-I 2. Tests of flexibility, concentration, VO2 max., balance 3. Observing and assessing the video/tournament recording/movie and preparing a report 4. Teaching lessons REFERENCESYoga 1. Anand, Omprarkash. Yog Dawra Kaya Kalp, Kanpur, Sewasth Sahitya Perkashan, 2001. 2. Sarin, N., Yoga Dawara Ragoon Ka Upchhar, Khel Sahitya Kendra, 2003. 3. Sri, Swami Rama, Breathing, Rishikesh, Sadhana Mandir Trust, 2001. 4. Swami, Ram., Yoga & Married Life, Rishikesh Sadhana Mandir Trust, 2000. 5. Swami, Veda Bharti., Yoga, Polity, Economy and Family, Rishikesh Sadhana Mandir Trust, 2000. 109
  • 110. PAPER NO. – IV (ii) Module-II SUBJECT SPECIALIZATION – EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGYUNIT-1 ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS DURING EXERCISE 1.1 Exercise in Hot and Cold conditions • Thermoregulatory mechanism • Exercise in the Hot and Cold conditions: Physiological response, fluid electrolyte balance during exercise, Health Risks Associated with Exposure to heat and cold. • Acclimatization. 1.2 Exercise in Space, Altitude & Underwater: • Space and exercise: problems of exercise/work at space (zero gravity), physiological alteration with chronic microgravity exposure. • High altitude exercise: physiological response and associated health risk, acclimatization, high altitude training. • Under water exercise: Physiological response and Health risksUNIT-2 SPECIAL POPULATION IN EXERCISE AND SPORT 2.1 Children and Adolescents in Sport and Exercise • Growth and development of tissues • Physical activity and fitness promotion • Recognizing limits in training • Physical performance in young athlete 2.2 Women in Sports and Exercise • Specific issues: gynecological considerations: body size/dimensions and physiological differences with male counterpart. • Female athlete triad • Sports performance • Acute response and chronic adaptation • Expectant mother and exercise guidelinesUNIT-3 PHYSIOLOGY OF WEIGHT MANAGEMENT 3.1 • Exercise: The Key to Weight Management, Physiological foundation of obesity • Role of exercise, dieting and combination of exercising and dieting in weight loss • Low intensity versus high- intensity exercise for weight loss • Healthy weight loss • Weight loss myths • Physiological guidelines of losing weight. • Diet monitoringUNIT-4 EXERCISE PRESCRIPTIONS FOR FITNESS COMPONENTS 4. 1 Cardio respiratory exercise prescription • Intensity of exercise • Mode of exercise • Duration • Frequency • Fitness benefit • Physiological factors affecting development of cardio respiratory fitness 110
  • 111. 4. 2 Physiology of Strength-Training • Factors affecting strength development • Principles of strength training • Plyometrics • Core strength training • Exercise guidelines, assessment at initial stage, quantum of load/ prevention of injury.UNIT-5 PRESCRIPTION FOR INITIALCONDITIONING, IMPROVEMENTAND MAINTENANCE 5.1 Stimulus for Adaptation to Cardiovascular and Musclo Skeletal System • Training session components • General versus Individualized exercise prescription: • Cardio respiratory fitness: exercise intensity 1. Percentage of heart rate reserve Percent VO2 max reserve • Energy expenditure • Flexibility • Muscular strength/endurance • Progression through exercise prescription 5.2 Assessing Goals and Commitment To Exercise: • Assessment of health-related fitness • Modification of behavior • Monitoring behavior • Periodic re-evaluation of the three steps abovePRACTICAL: 1. Assessment of muscular strength/endurance (lab/field) 2. Calculating exercise intensity by Heart rate reserve and VO2 max reserve. 3. Assessment of body composition in children, men and women. 4. Testing flexibility (different joints :wrist , arm, &back). 5. Testing muscular strength by isometric/isokinetic contraction. 6. Assessment of speed. REFERENCES 1. Anderson, Ross E. Obesity: Etiology, Assessment, treatment, Prevention Human Kinetics 2003. 2. Ann.F Lowlin. Women’s Fitness Program Development. Human Kinetics. 2002. 3. Rowland, Thomas W. children’s Exercise Physiology. 2nd Edition Human Kinetics. 2005 4. Wilmore, Jack H and Costill, David L. Physiology of Sports and Exercise. Human kinetics. 1994. 111
  • 112. PAPER NO. – IV (ii) Module-II SUBJECT SPECIALIZATION – SPORTS BIO-MECHANICSUNIT – I1. THE STUDY OF RELATED SUBJECTS The Skeletal system and its Articulations. The skeletal system, articulations and properties. Biomechanics and related subjects Kinanthropometric characteristics effecting the mechanics of human movement2. NEUROMUSCULAR ASPECTS OF MOVEMENT Functional aspects of the muscular system Types and functions of muscular of tension All and none law Strength of contraction Group action of Muscles Reciprocal innervation Muscular FatigueUNIT - II3. BIOMECHANICS OF THE MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM Lever like arrangements, wheel and axle like arrangements, Pulley like arrangements, general consideration of muscular skeletal machines.4. APPLICATION OF BIOMECHANICS TO NEUROMUSCULAR FITNESS ACTIVITIES Aspects of fitness, resistance devices used in training, strength, muscular endurance, muscular power, flexibility.UNIT - III5. LINEAR MOVEMENT RESPONSES TO APPLIED FORCES Linear speed and velocity, linear acceleration, the relationship of force, mass and linear acceleration, centripetal force and radial acceleration. LINEAR MOVEMENT AND KINETIC ENERGY Linear momentum, linear impulse, conservation of linear momentum, kinetic energy.6. ROTARY MOVEMENT RESPONSE TO APPLIED TORQUES Angular speed and velocity, linear velocity of a point on a rotating body, angular acceleration, the relationship of torque, rotational inertia and angular acceleration. ANGULAR MOMENTUM Angular momentum, angular impulse, conservation of angular momentum within a system, vector resolution of angular momentum.UNIT - IV7. ANALYSIS OF ACTIVITIES IN WHICH THE BODY ROTATES FREE OF SUPPORT The human body in rotary motion, initiating rotations, analysis of rotations while airborne. ANALYSIS OF ACTIVITIES IN WHICH THE BODY ROTATES WHILE SUPPORTED The human body in supported rotary motion, conservation of segmental momentum in a supported system, application of angular momentum principles to a supported body.8. PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF THROW LIKE MOVEMENTS Biomechanics of throw like patterns, analysis of sport skills using the kinetic link principle, comparisons of similar skills within the same pattern, performance errors: teaching and coaching applications, developmental patterns: teaching implications. 112
  • 113. PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF PUSH LIKE MOVEMENTS Force activities, power activities, and accuracy activities.UNIT – V :9. BIOMECHANICAL ANALYSIS OF MOVEMENTS MOVEMENT ANALYSIS definition of kinesiological analysis, mechanical analysis, and biomechanical analysis brief knowledge about qualitative analysis and quantitative analysis. ANALYSIS OF FUNDAMENTAL SKILLS Walking, Running, Jumping, Throwing, Lifting, Pulling, Pushing, Catching, Climbing Method of one fundamental skill will be taught Other skill will be given as assignment ANALYSIS OF SPORTS SKILL Athletics, Gymnastics, Swimming, Football, Hockey, Basketball, Volleyball, Cricket & Judo method of one of the sports skill will be taught Other skill will be given as assignmentPRACTICAL 1. Evaluation of dynamogram recorded from force place and/ or force Transducers of a simple movement i.g. Vertical jump. 2. Use of bio- feed back in basic human movement. 3. Use of Different type of direct measurement techniques in basic human movement (Goniomtre). 4. Measurement of Muscle Anthropomety (cross sectional area, change of muscle length during movement, force per unit cross sectional etc). 5. Use of computer programme for determining length of throw in jump or shot put. 6. Use of computer programme for determining optimum angle of a projection in throw or jump. 7. Use of Electromyography of Isometric Tension and / muscle shortening and lengthening and/ fatigue. 8. Evaluation of dynamogram to draw a velocity-time graph, distance- time graph. REFERENCES th1. Basis of Human Motion. 8 ed, Brown & Bench mark.2. Gowitzke, B.A. and Milner, M. (1988). Scientific Bases of Human Movement. (3rd. ed.), Baltimore: Williams and Wilkins.3. Grimshaw, Paul., Lees, Adrian., Flower, Neil.,& Burden, Adrian. Sports and Exercise Biomechanics.Taylor & Francis.4. Groves, R and Camaine, D. (1983). Concepts in Kinesiology. (2nd. ed.). Philadelphia: Saunders College Publishing.5. Hall, Susan J. Basic Biomechanics. Mosby Year Book6. Hay, J. (1978). The biomechanics of sport techniques. (2nd. ed.). Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall.7. Hay, J. & Reid, J. (1982). The Anatomical and Mechanical Bases of Human Motion. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall.8. Luttegens, Kathryn., Deutsch, Helga., Hamilton, Nancy. Kinesiology-Scientific9. Nordin, M. & Frankel, V. (1990). Basic Biomechanics of the Musculoskeletal System, Philadelphia: Lea & Febiger.10. Northrip, J., Logan, G. & McKinney, W. (1983). Analysis of Sport Motion. (3rd. ed). Dubuque: William C. Brown.11. Rasch, P. (1989). Kinesiology and Applied Anatomy. Philadelphia: Lea & Febiger.12. Shaw, D., Mechanical Basis of Biomechanics, Delhi: Sport Pub., 2000.13. Shaw, D., Mechanical Basis of Biomechanics, London: A&C, 2003.14. Shaw, D, Pedagogic Kinesiology, Khel Sahitya Kendra 2007. 113
  • 114. 15. Thompson, C. (1985). Manual of Structural Kinesiology. (10th Ed.). St. Louis: Times Mirror/ Mosby College Publishing. 114
  • 115. PAPER NO. – IV (ii) Module-II SUBJECT SPECIALIZATION – EXERCISE & SPORT PSYCHOLOGYUNIT-I PERSONALITY & SPORT 1.1 Concept and definition of personality 1.2 Personality theories - (trait, psychoanalysis, behavioral, biological & social learning theory, humanistic theory) 1.3 Personality traits of elite athletes 1.4 Personality an sport interactionismUNIT-II ANXEITY & AROUSAL 2.1 Concept and categories of emotions 2.2 Neurophysiological basis of anxiety and arousal 2.3 Role of autonomic nervous system in anxiety and arousal states 2.4 Effect of anxiety and arousal on performance in sport 2.5 Anxiety and arousal theories Inverted - U theory Drive theory Fazey & Hardy’s catastrophe model Apter’s reversal theoryUNIT-III PSYCHOLOGICAL SKILLS IN SPORTS 3.1 Meaning and concept of psychological skills 3.2 Implication of psychological skills 3.3 Various psychological skills Attention Concentration Confidence Imagery Anxiety management IndependenceUNIT-IV SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY 4.1 Concept & theory of affiliation 4.2 Social isolation & affiliation in sports 4.3 Concept of self-efficacy, self-esteem and self - concept 4.4 Audience effect - social facilitation, home ground advantage 4.5 Aggregation in sport 4.6 Concept and theories of aggregation instinct, frustration aggregation, social learning theory acquired 4.7 Sport aggression - innate and acquired 4.8 Individual differences in aggressionUNIT-V COUNSELLING AND MENTAL HEALTH OF PARTICIPANTS AND ATHLETES 5.1 Concept of counseling 5.2 Expectation of different athletes 5.3 Counseling process 5.4 Exercise and sport as promoters of good mental health 5.5 Mental health & mental hygiene perspective 5.6 Principles of mental health 5.7 Level of aspiration & achievement – a mental health perspective 115
  • 116. REFERENCESPsychology 1. Aggarwal, J.C., Basic Ideas in Educational Psychology, Delhi: Sipra, 2003. 2. Bhatia, Hans Raj, Test Book of Educational Psychology, Delhi: Macmillan, 2003. 3. Cashmore, Ellis, Key Concepts in Sport Psychology, London, Routledge, 2004. 4. Cox, R. H., Sport Psychology Ed 5 Th., London, Mcgraw Hill, 2002. 5. Dewey, John, Psychology, New Delhi: K.S.K., 2003. 6. Jain, D., Introduction to Psychology, New Delhi: K.S.K., 2003. 7. Jain, Piyush and Tomar, C.S., History, Foundation of Physical Education and Educational Psychology, New Delhi, Friends, 2006. 8. Kamlesh, M.L, Educational Sport Psychology, New Delhi, Friends Pub., 2006. 9. Kamlesh, M.L., Key Ideas in Sport Psychology, New Delhi, Friends Pub., 2007. Kutty, S.K., Foundations of Sports & Exercise Psychology, New Delhi: Sports, 2004. 10. Levinthal, Charles F., Introduction to Physiological Psychology, N.D. Prentice Hall, 2005. 11. Seashore, C.E., Elementary Experiments in Psychology, ND: Sports Pub., 2001. 12. Shaw, D., An Encyclopedia of Test and Measurement in Sports Exercise Psychology, New Delhi, 2001. 13. Woodworth, R.S., Basic Facts in Psychology, ND: Sports Pub., 2001. 116
  • 117. PAPER NO. – IV (ii) Module-II SUBJECT SPECIALIZATION – PROFESSIONAL PREPARATION & CURRICULUM DESIGNPROFESSIONAL REQUIREMENTSUNIT-I HIERARCHY OF SPORTS ORGANIZATIONS, FUNCTIONS OF SPORTS BODIES- GOVERNMENTAL AND NON-GOVERNMENTAL.UNIT-II ACADEMIC (SCIENTIFIC) INTERACTION: 2.1 Conferences, seminars, symposium, workshops etc. -Preparation of abstracts -Writing and presentation of papers -Poster presentation 2.2 Conducting a scientific session (Role of chairperson, co- chairperson, reporters)UNIT-III PROFESSIONAL RELATION 3.1 Principles and philosophy of democratic relation 3.2 Intra and inter relationship among administrators, colleagues, Student/client group, CommunityUNIT-IV METHODS OF TEACHING AND INSTRUCTIONAL LEADERSHIP 4.1 Principles influencing physical education teaching 4.2 Methods of teaching - Command Style - Demonstration Method - Task Method - Exploration Method - Problem solving Method 4.3 Developing teacher competencies 4.4 Developing qualitative of researcherUNIT-V VALUES AND ETHICS 5.1 Developing code of conduct 5.2 Developing departmental policies 5.3 Prevailing Licensing trends in physical education and sports, its implication in the Indian reference 5.4 Professional commitmentsPRACTICAL 1. Write a brief report/proposal on sports – event/activity 2. Developing an abstract or a research paper or a poster presentation REFERENCES 1. Adams William C. Foundation of Physical Education Exercise and Sports Sciences, Philadelphia, 1991 2. Gupta Rakesh, Sharma Akhilesh, and Sharma Santosh, Professional Preparation and Curriculum Design in Physical Education & sports Sciences, New Delhi, Friends Publications, 2004 3. Hoover. Kenneth H., The Professional Teacher’s Handbook, Boston, Allyn and Bacoon, 1972 4. Krik David, Physical Education and Curriculum Study, Kent, Croom Helm, 1988 5. Sandhu Kiran, Professional Preparation and Career Development in Physical Education, New Delhi, Friends Publications, 2004 6. Sandhu Kiran, Trends and Development in Professional Preparation in Physical Education, New Delhi, Friends Publication, 2006 7. Wessel Janet A, and Kelly Luke, Achievement-Based Curriculum Development in Physical Education, Philadepia, Lea and Febiger, 1986 8. Zeigler E.F, Professional and Scholarly Foundation of Physical Education and Kinesiology, Sports Educational Technologies, 2007 117
  • 118. PAPER NO. – IV (ii) Module-II SUBJECT SPECIALIZATION –SPORT SOCIOLOGYUNIT-I SOCIETY AND IMPACT OF SPORT 1.1 Definition and concept of society 1.2 Type of society and sport 1.3 Sports in human society (ancient, feudal, capitalistic and socialistic) 1.4 Structure of various sports group 1.5 Cohesiveness in various sportsUNIT-II CULTURE AND SUB CULTURE 2.1 Culture and sport culture 2.2 Components and mechanism of sport culture 2.3 Cultural relativism and culture lag 2.4 Sport as a social phenomenon 2.5 Sports as a commodityUNIT-III SPORT AND ECONOMIC AND POLITICAL INSTITUTION 3.1 Sport and business 3.2 Psycho-social implications of revenue generation and revenue sharing among various stakeholders in sport organizations 3.3 Sponsorship in sport 3.4 Political ideology and sport 3.5 Politics in sportUNIT-IV SPORTS AND STRATIFICATION 4.1 Sport and stratification (classes, castes, genders, age) 4.2 Social stratification and mobility 4.3 Social classes and primary and secondary involvement in sport 4.4 Individual personality, identity, action in sport 4.5 Moral character and sportUNIT-V SPORT AND DISCOURSE 5.1 Power play and sport 5.2 Sports culture in colonial period in India 5.3 Amateurism and professionalism 5.4 Structuralism and post structuralismPRACTICAL AND ASSIGNMENT 1. Scale of cultural determination and modernization scale. 2. Prepare a paper on topic from any unit of your choice with at least 15 references. 3. Present a paper on any topic from any unit other than assignments given above by adopting empirical (data-based) and analytical approach. 4. Construct an open pedagogical design of team preparation for an inter-college competition in game if your choice. REFERENCESSociology 1. Bhusan, V. and Sachdeva, An Introduction to Sociology, Delhi: Kitab, 2003. 2. IGNOU, The Study of Society - Understanding Sociology, Delhi - IGNOU, 2007. 3. Inkeles, A. Ed., What Is Sociology, ND: Prentice Hall, 1997. 4. Jain, Rachna, Sports Sociology, New Delhi: KSK, 2005. 5. Kanwal Jeet, S., Sport Sociology, ND: Friends Pub., 2000. 6. Mitchell, G.D. Ed., Dictionary of Sociology, U.K: Routledge, 1999. 7. Sharma, R. N, Urban Sociology, ND: Surjeet Pub., 1993. 118
  • 119. 8. Singh, Bhupinder, Sports Sociology, New Delhi: Friends, 2004.9. Turner, B., Cambridge Dictionary of Sociology, U.K., Cambridge, U.N. Press., 200610. SPORT IN SOCIETY, ISSUES AND CONTROVERSIES by Joy. J. Coaplay. Mcgraw Hill International edition 199711. THE SOCIAL SIGNIFICANCE OF SPORT B.D.Mc Pherson, J.E.Curtis, and J.W. Loy Human Kinetics books Champaign Illinois U.S.A.198912. UNDERTAKING SPORT – AN INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIOLOGY AND CULTURAL ANALYSIS OF SPORT J.Hosue, A. Tomlinson, G. Whannel, Routbdge, New York 199913. SPORT AND SOCIAL SYSTEMS, A GUIDE TO THE ANALYSIS PROBLEMS LITRETURE by J.W. Loy, B.D. Mc pherson , G. Kenyon, Addison wesley publishing company Messachuslls 197814. WORLD WIDE TRENDS IN YOUTH SPORT, P.D. Knop, L.M. Engstrow, B. Sbisstadd M.R.Uleiss Human Kinetics 199615. POWER AND RADIOLOGY IN AMERICAN SPORT, A CRITICAL PERSPECTIVE, G.H Sege Human Kinetics 199816. SOCIOLOGY, THE BASICS by M.Abrow Roulledge London 200117. SAMAAJSHASTRA AVDHARANAAYE AUR SIDHAANT, Dr. J.P. Singh, Prentis Hall of India New Delhi 199918. SAMAAJSHASTRA KE SIDHAANT, Writer Vidhyabhushan, Dr. D.R. Sachdeva, Kitaab Mahal Ellahabad 197919. Sociology Basic concepts by H.K. Rawat, Rawat Publication 200720. Learning Experience in Sociology of Sport by Lusan L. Greendoefor, C.A. Hasbroob, Human Kinetics Books Champaign, Illions U.S.A. 199121. Moping Sense of Sports, by Ellis Cashmore Routeedge, New York, 200022. Dictionary of sociology, Penguine reference23. Social issues in Sports by Ronald B. Woods Human Kinetics 200724. Stanly eitzan and George H. Sage, Sociology of world American Sports, Bastow, M. A: W C B/Mcgraw Hill 199725. Sports in Contemporary Society: An ethnology worth publications, New York-200126. Sport and Society by N.I. panomaryow, progress publication Moscow-198127. Sport and Social Order: Contributions to the sociology of sports by Donald. W. Ball and John W. Joy, Addison Wesley Publishing company 197528. Sport and Politics- Edited by G. Redmond Human Kinetics publishers, In Champaign, Illinois 198629. Women in Sports, a selected biography by M. Shoebridge, Mansell publishing Ltd. London and New York 198730. Theory, Sport and Society by J. Maguire and K. Young JAI, Elsevier Ltd. 200531. Sport in South Asian Society Past and Present edited by B. Majuardar and J. A. Morgan Reutledge, New York and London 200532. Social aspect of Sport by E.E. Snyder and Prentis Hall Jersey 197833. Sports beyond the iron curtain by freeman. S. and Boyes R. London Protcus Publishing Company 198034. Sport Spectators by A. Gultmann Colombia University, New York 1986 119
  • 120. PAPER NO. – IV (ii) Module-II SUBJECT SPECIALIZATION – SPORT MANAGEMENT HUMAN RESOURCE MANAEGMENT UNIT-I INTRODUCTION 1.1 Meaning and concept of human resource in sports 1.2 Role of sports professionals in developing humans resources in society 1.3 Public relations 1.4 Group dynamics UNIT-II PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT 2.1 Recruitment sources 2.2 Selection process 2.3 Training-methods 2.4 Appraisal and career advancement UNIT-III LEADERSHIP 3.1 Meaning and changing concepts of leadership in sports 3.2 Need and significance of leadership 3.3 Leadership traits and types of leadership 3.4 Opportunities for inculcation of leadership skills and traitsUNIT-IV COMMUNICATION 4.1 Meaning and concept of communication 4.2 Channels of communication 4.3 Types and tools of communication 4.4 Communication with media and public UNIT-V MOTIVATION 5.1 Meaning and concept of motivation 5.2 Type of motivation 5.3 Need and theories of motivation 5.4 Creating and maintenance of motivation REFERENCES Sport Management 1. Allen, L.A. Management & Organization. Kogakusha Co. Tokyo, 1988. 2. Hert, Renis, New Patterns of Management, McGraw Hill, 1961. 3. Sivia, G.S. Sports Management in Universities, New Delhi: A.I.U. Deen Dayal Upadhyaya Marg, 1991. 4. Sandhu, K. Sports Dynamics: Psychology, Sociology and Management 120
  • 121. 121
  • 122. SEMESTER-IIIS. Paper Module Title of the PaperNo. No.1. VI Athlete’s Care and Rehabilitation2. III (iii) III Game of Specialization (One to be selected from the list) 1. Athletics 2. Aquatics (Swimming, Diving & Water-polo) 3. Badminton 4. Basketball 5. Cricket 6. Football 7. Gymnastics 8. Handball 9. Hockey 10. Judo 11. Kabaddi 12. Kho-Kho 13. Table Tennis 14. Volleyball 15. Yoga3. VII Optional Group-I (One to be selected from the list) 1. Fundamentals of Sport Sociology 2. Fundamentals of Sport Psychology 3. Fundamentals of Health Education 4. Fundamentals of Sports Biomechanics 5. Fundamentals of Exercise Physiology 6. Fundamentals of Sport Management & Administration4. IV (iii) III Subject Specialization (One to be selected from the list) 1. Exercise Physiology 2. Sport Biomechanics 3. Exercise & Sport Psychology 4. Professional Preparation & Curriculum Design 5. Sport Sociology 6. Sport Management 122
  • 123. PAPER NO. – VI Module-III ATHLETE’S CARE AND REHABILITATIONUNIT-I INTRODUCTION 1.1 Meaning and definition of related terminologies Athlete, fitness, wellness, performance Care Rehabilitation Sports Medicine Sports Medicine 1.2 Aim, objectives and scope of ACR/SM 1.3 Principles of care and rehabilitation 1.4 Role of physical educators in athletic care and Rehabilitation 1.5 Exercise as a preventive measure for diseaseUNIT-II SPORTS INJURIES 2.1 Introduction: meaning, definition 2.2 Various classification of Sports Injuries 2.3 Causes/reasons of sports injuries 2.4 Prevention of sports injuries 2.5 Treatment and management of sports injuriesUNIT-III AGE AND GENDER CONSIDERATION IN SPORTS 3.1 Biological, chronological age and age determination 3.2 Suitability of sports at various stages of growth 3.3 Special problems women and sports performance 3.4 Exercise benefits at various stages of life 3.5 Physical, physiological, bio-chemical and bio-mechanical difference between men & womenUNIT-IV ENVIRONMENT & SPORTS PERFORMANCE INTRODUCTION 4.1 Various types of environmental conditions 4.2 Medical problems due to environment and their symptoms 4.3 Treatment of medical problem and acclimatization in temperature 4.4 Training in different temperature and altitude (high & low Pressure) 4.5 Training of different surfaceUNIT-V ERGOGENIC AIDS & DOPING IN SPORTS 5.1 Meaning, definition, classification benefits of ergogenic 5.2 Nutrition and sports Performance 5.3 Definition, classes, method of doping 5.4 Side effects, detection and sanction against doping 5.5 IOC, FIMS , WADA, NADO, RADOPRACTICALS1. First Aid for: Soft tissue, bone & joint injuries2. Therapeutic Modalities (i) Cryotherapy (ii) Thermotherapy I/R lamps Wax bath (iii) Electrotherapy TENS Short wave diatherapy Microwave diatherapy 123
  • 124. Ultra sound (iv) Hydrotherapy (v) Exercise therapy Isometric exercise Isotonic exercise Manual massage therapy REFERENCES1. Davies, J.E., Essentials of Sports Medicine, New Delhi, 1986.2. Ellison, A.E. and others, Athletic Training & Sports Medicine, American Academy, 1984.3. Eriksson, B.O.[et.al.], Sports Medicine, Great Britain: Guiness Pub., 1990.4. Irvin, R. and others, Sports Medicine, USA : Allyn and Bacon, 1998.5. Jain, Rachna, Sports Medicine, New Delhi: KSK, 2002.6. Khanna, G.L & Jayprakash, C.S., Exercise Physiology & Sports Medicine, Lucky, 1990.7. Khanna, G.L., Exercise Physiology & Sports Medicine, Lucky Enterprises, 1990.8. Komi, P.V., Encyclopaedia of Sports Medicine, Blackwell, 1992.9. Pande, P.K., Sports Medicine, ND; Khel Sahitya Kendra, 1998.10. Pandey, P.K., Outline of Sports Medicine, Delhi: J.P. Brothers, 1987.11. Prentice, W.E., Therapeutic Modalities in Sports Medicine, Times Mirror, 1990.12. Renstrom, Encyclopaedia of Sports Medicine, Blackwell, 1993.13. Roy and Irvin, Sports Medicine, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, 1983.14. Shephard and Astrand, Encyclopaedia of Sports Medicine, Blackwell, 1992.15. Shephard, R.J. & Astrand, P.O., Encyclpedia of Sports Medicine, Blackwell, Sc. Pub., 1992.16. Shephard, R.J., Yearbook of Sports Medicine, Mosby Yearbook, 1990.17. Torg, J.S. and others, Current Therapy in Sports Medicine, New Delhi, 1996.18. Vijay Ed., Handbook of Sports Medicine, Delhi: Friends Pub, 2001. 124
  • 125. PAPER NO. – III (iii) Module-III GAME OF SPECIALIZATION – ATHLETICSFOCUSED ATHLETIC EVENTS:Hurdles : For Men - 110m & 400m; For Women – 100m& 400mRelays : 4 x 100 m., 4 x 400 m.Combined Events : Heptathlon & DecathlonUNIT-I RULES AND REGULATIONS 1.1 As specified by the IAAF and AFI 1.2 Role and contributions of SGFI and AIU 1.3 Role of International Olympic Committee (IOC)UNIT-II TECHNICAL PREPARATION FOR FOCUSED ATHLETIC EVENTS 2.1 Required motor abilities and their technical preparation 2.2 Technical and tactical preparation 2.3 Physical, physiological, psychological and sociological characteristics of athletesUNIT-III OFFICIATING AND COACHING 3.1 Qualities and duties/responsibilities of a coach 3.2 Duties/responsibilities of respective technical officials – jury of appeal, judges at the finish, time keepers, lap scorers, judges at baton exchange zone, marshalls etc. 3.3 Role of sports psychologists & sports physiotherapistsUNIT-IV ORGANIZATION OF THE ATHLETICS MEET 4.1 Structure and organization of the athletics meet 4.2 Budgeting, purchase of equipments 4.3 Preparation, execution and conclusion of the respective events 4.4 Protocols and ceremoniesUNIT-V COACHING LESSONS 5.1 Guidelines for preparing coaching lessons in athletics 5.2 Preparation of coaching lesson-plans 5.3 Use of teaching aidsPRACTICALS 1. Different techniques of specified events : hurdles (for men - 110m & 400m; for women – 100m & 400m), relays (4 x 100m & 4 x 400m), combined events (heptathlon & decathlon) 2. Practice and training of selected events 3. Organization and planning in specified events 4. Project on researches in athletics and records of events 5. Coaching lessons REFERENCESAthletics 1. Chauhan, B.S., Khel Jagat Mein Athletics, Jalandhar: A.P. Pub., 1999. 2. Evans, D.A., Teaching Athletics, London: Hodder, 1984. 3. Fox, E.L., Physiological Basis of Physical Education and Athletics, Brown Pub., 1989. 4. Frost, R.B. and others, Administration of Physical Education and Athletics, Delhi: Universal Book, 1992. 5. Gothi, Ekta, Teaching & Coaching Athletics, ND: Sport Pub., 1997. 6. Knight, T. and Troop, N., Sackville Illustrated Dictionary of Athletics, Jackvillie, 1988. 7. Knigt, T., Athletics, Backville Book, 1988. 8. Renwick, G.R., Play Better Athletics, Delhi: Sports Pub., 2001. 9. Shri Vastav, Abhay Kumar, Athletics, S & S Parkashan, 1997. 10. Singh, Granth, Track and Field Athletics, Delhi: Ashoka, 1998. 11. Thani, Lokesh., Skills and Tactics Track Athletics, Delhi : Sports Pub., 1995. 12. Thani, Y. ed., Encyclopedia of Athletics, Delhi, Gian Pub, 1991. 13. Turbbull, S., Sports Views Guide Athletics, London: David & Charles, 1989. 14. Warden, P., Take Up Athletics, Springfield Books Ltd., 1990. 125
  • 126. 15. Weaver, T., Personal Best: Athletics, London: Willionm Colliv., 1988. 126
  • 127. PAPER NO. – III (iii) Module-III GAME OF SPECIALIZATION – AQUATICS (SWIMMING, DIVING & WATER-POLO)UNIT-I RULES, REGULATIONS AND INTERPRETATIONS 1.1 Specified by the FINA 1.2 Latest changes and developments in rules and regulations, techniques and tactics, officiating and coaching etc.UNIT-II OFFICIATING AND COACHING 2.1 Qualifications, qualities and responsibilities of a coach, Philosophy of coaching 2.2 Qualifications and responsibilities/functions of technical officials 2.3 Protocols of technical officials 2.4 Role of sports psychologists, sports physiotherapists and fitness trainersUNIT-III ORGANISATION OF THE COMPETITION 3.1 Planning for the competition 3.2 Organisation of the competition 3.3 Selection of men, material and management 3.4 Concluding the competition – submission of accounts, preparing report 3.5 Protocols and ceremoniesUNIT-IV PROFESSIONAL PREPARATION FOR : 4.1 Coaching a team 4.2 Organising a competition 4.3 Officiating in a competition 4.4 Conducting a workshop/seminar/clinicUNIT-V COACHING LESSONS 5.1 Guidelines for preparing a coaching lesson in swimming 5.2 Preparation of coaching lesson-plans 5.3 Use of teaching aidsPRACTICALS1 Planning for competitions2 Organisation of a competition/seminar/workshop/clinic3 Project on research in aquatics/record of events4 Coaching lessons REFERENCESAquatics 1. Jain, R., Play and Learn Swimming, New Delhi, Khel Sahitya Kendra, 2003. 2. Kumar, Naveen., Coaching Successfully, Sports Publication, Delhi 2002. 3. Nelson, R., Macnee, M.J.Ed., Olympic Fact book: A Spectators Guide to the Summer games, New York Visible, 1996. 4. Thani, Lokesh., Swimming, Delhi, Sports Publisher, 2000. 5. Thani, Lokesh., Skill & Tactics Swimming" Delhi, Sports Publication, 1995. 127
  • 128. PAPER NO. – III (iii) Module-III GAME OF SPECIALIZATION – BADMINTONUNIT-I RULES, REGULATIONS AND INTERPRETATIONS 1.1 As specified by the Badminton Association of India (BAI) 1.2 As per the International Badminton Federation (IBF) 1.3 Latest developments 1.4 Latest amendments 1.5 InterpretationsUNIT-II OFFICIATING AND COACHING 2.1 Duties/responsibilities, qualifications and qualities of a coach 2.2 Philosophy of coaching 2.3 Qualifications and responsibilities/functions of technical officials 2.4 Protocols of referees, judges, umpires 2.5 Role of sports psychologists, sports physiotherapists and fitness trainersUNIT-III ORGANISATION OF THE COMPETITION 3.1 Planning for the competition 3.2 Selection of men, material and management 3.3 Concluding the competition – submission of accounts, preparing report 3.4 Protocols and ceremoniesUNIT-IV PROFESSIONAL PREPARATION FOR : 4.1 Coaching a team 4.2 Organising a competition 4.3 Officiating in a competition 4.4 Conducting a workshop/seminar/clinic 4.5 Professional aspects of badmintonUNIT-V COACHING LESSONS 5.1 Preparing coaching lessons in badminton 5.2 Use of teaching aids 5.3 Conduct of regular coaching 5.4 Concluding aspects of the coaching lesson 5.5 AssimilationPRACTICALS 1. Planning for competitions 2. Organisation of a competition/seminar/workshop/clinic 3. Project on research in badminton 4. Coaching lessons REFERENCESBadminton 1. Ashok Kumar, Badminton, New Delhi Discovery., 2003. 2. Ballou, Palph B., Teaching Badminton, India, 1982. 3. Bloss, M.V & Hales, R.S., Badminton, WC Brown, 1994. 4. Davis, Pat, Badminton, S.A. David & Charles Inc., 1988. 5. Downey, J., How to Coach Badminton, London: Collins Pub., 1990. 6. Jain, Deepak, Teaching and Coaching –Badminton, Delhi : Khel S.K., 2001. 7. Kumar, Ashok, Badminton, Delhi : Discovery Pub., 1999. 8. Narang, P., Play and Learn Badminton, Khel Sahitaya Kendra, 2005. 9. Singh, M.K., A to Z Badminton, New Delhi, Friends Pub., 2006. 10. Singh, M.K., Comprehensive Badminton, N.D. Friends Pub., 2007. 128
  • 129. 11. Talbot, Derlk, Top Coach Badminton, Britain : Q.A. Press, 1989. 129
  • 130. PAPER NO. – III (iii) Module-III GAME OF SPECIALIZATION – BASKETBALLUNIT-I ORGANISATION 1.1 Selection of a team and conduct of a camp 1.2 Playfield technology- planning, construction and maintenance of a basketball court 1.3 Conduct of a tournament 1.4 Short-term and long-term planning for organization of a competition 1.5 Report writing, photography, analysis and commentaryUNIT-II MATCH ANALYSIS 2.1 Evaluation of players performance during matches 2.2 Video analysis of skills and techniques 2.3 Assessment of prospective opponentsUNIT-III OFFICIATING 3.1 Duties and responsibilities of officials 3.2 Mechanism of officiating and scoringUNIT-IV MANAGEMENT 4.1 Managing team during competitions 4.2 Information and publicity concerning the competition 4.3 Office management – correspondence and maintenance of records 4.4 Facility management – quality control of equipment and player’s kit 4.5 Risk management - medical check up, medical aid and insurance 4.6 Personnel management – interpersonal communication skillsUNIT-V MARKETING AND PLAYER PROFILE 5.1 Event identification and event profile development 5.2 Projection of the event and marketing strategy – pamphlets, door - door, newspaper, electronic media 5.3 Writing press release and reports 5.4 Sponsor identification, fund raising 5.5 Building of player portfolio, development of a contract and understanding of lawsPRACTICAL 1. Organizing basketball tournaments 2. One month internship with a leading newspaper for sports press releases REFERENCESBasket Ball 1. Ambler, V., How to Play Basket Ball, Delhi: Paper Balls, 1984. 2. Pruitt, Jim, Play Better Basket Ball, Great Britain: Matchplan Books, 1983. 3. Prutti, Jim, Play Better Basket Ball, Matchplay Books, 1984. 4. Thani, Lokesh, Skills & Tactics of Basket Ball, ND: Sport Pub., 1995. 5. Nat B. B Conditioning Coaches Association, NBA Power Conditioning, Human Kinetics, 1997 6. Jain, Naveen Play and Learn Basket Ball, Khel Sahitya Kendra, New Delhi-2003 7. Sharma O.P. Basket Ball Skills and Rules, Khel Sahitya Kendra Delhi-2003 8. Thani, Yograj, Coaching Successfully Basket Ball, Sports Publisher, Delhi-2002 130
  • 131. PAPER NO. – III (iii) Module-III GAME OF SPECIALIZATION – CRICKETUNIT-I ORGANIZATION 1.1 Selection of a team and conduct of a camp 1.2 Playfield technology - planning, construction and maintenance of the cricket field 1.3 Conduct of a Tournament 1.4 Short-term and long-term planning for organization of a competition 1.5 Report writing, photography, analysis and commentaryUNIT-II MATCH ANALYSIS 2.1 Evaluation of players’ performance during matches 2.2 Video-analysis of skills and techniques, importance of a third umpire 2.3 Assessment of prospective opponentsUNIT-III OFFICIATING 3.1 Duties and responsibilities of officials 3.2 Mechanism of officiating and scoringUNIT-IV MANAGEMENT 4.1 Managing team during competitions 4.2 Information and publicity concerning competition 4.3 Office management – correspondence and maintenance of records 4.4 Facility management – quality control of equipment and player’s kit 4.5 Risk management - medical check-up, medical aid and insurance 4.6 Personnel management – communication and inter-personnel skillsUNIT-V MARKETING AND PLAYER PROFILE 5.1 Event identification and event profile development 5.2 Projection of the event and marketing strategy – pamphlets, door-to-door, newspaper, electronic media 5.3 Writing press releases and reports 5.4 Sponsor identification, fund raising 5.5 Building of player-portfolio, preparing/drawing a contract and understanding pertinent lawsPRACTICALS1. Advancement of different techniques 1.1 Video-analysis 1.2 Net Session2. Organize intramurals in the institution3. Organizing camping, scouting & giving commentary4. Coaching lesson – 5 (five) internal lessons 131
  • 132. REFERENCESCricket 1. Aibara, E.B., Cricket, Delhi : National Museum, 1993. 2. Amarnath, Mohinder, Learn to Play Good Cricket, ND : Ubspd, 1996. 3. Andrew, K., Handbook of Cricket, England : Perlham Book, 1989. 4. Brown, The Pictorial History of Cricket, Hong Kong, 1988. 5. Chugh, G.D., Laws of Cricket, N.D. D.V.S.Pub., 1993. 6. Dellor, R., How to Coach Cricket, London: Mandola, 1990. 7. Jain, R., Play and Learn Cricket, New Delhi: K.S.K, 2003. 8. Kutty, S. K., Fielding Drills in Cricket, New Delhi: K.S.K, 2003. 9. Morrison, I., How to Play Cricket, Competition R. Pri. Ltd., 1993. 10. Rachna, Coaching Successfully: Cricket, Delhi: Sports, 2002. 11. Rachna, Jain, Play & Learn Cricket, Khel Sahitaya Kendra, 2005. 12. Rice P., How to Play Cricket, London: Guinness, 1988. 13. Sharangpani, R.C., Fitness Training in Cricket, Bombay: Marine Sports, 1992. 14. Sharma, Prahlad, Cricket, Jaipur: Shyam Prakashan, 2003. 15. Swpnronobe, E.W., Barclayas World of Cricket, London, Willow Book, 1986. 16. Thani, Vivek, Coaching Cricket, ND: Khel Sahitya, 1998. 17. Thasi, Y. [ed.], The Encyclopedia of Cricket, New Delhi, 1991. 18. Vic Marks, The Test Country Cricket Board Guide to Better Cricket, London, 1987. 19. Willis, Cricket, India, 1987. 132
  • 133. PAPER NO. – III (iii) Module-III GAME OF SPECIALIZATION – FOOTBALLUNIT-I ORGANISATION 1.1 Selection of a team and conduct of a camp 1.2 Playfield technology - planning, construction and maintenance of football field 1.3 Conduct of a tournament 1.4 Short-term and long-term planning for organization of a competition 1.5 Report writing, photography, analysis and commentaryUNIT-II MATCH ANALYSIS 2.1 Evaluation of player’s performance during matches 2.2 Video analysis of skills and techniques 2.3 Assessment of prospective opponentsUNIT-III OFFICIATING 3.1 Duties and responsibilities of officials 3.2 Mechanism of officiating and scoringUNIT-IV MANAGEMENT 4.1 Team management during competitions 4.2 Information and publicity concerning the competition 4.3 Office management – correspondence and maintenance of records 4.4 Facility management – quality control of equipment and player’s kit 4.5 Risk management- medical check up, medical aid and insurance 4.6 Personnel management – interpersonal, interpersonnel communication skillsUNIT-V MARKETING AND PLAYER PROFILE 5.1 Event identification and event profile development 5.2 Projection of the event and marketing strategy – pamphlets, door - door, newspaper, electronic media Writing press release and reports Sponsor identification, fund raising Building of player portfolio, preparing (drawing) a contract and understanding of lawsPRACTICAL 1. Applied tactics of defense – positioning by a defender, defensive attacker, interchanging of position 2. Attacking tactics- shooting and heading at goal, place changing, special method-attack with two center forward 3. Refining of skills • Kicking • Receiving • Heading • Dribbling • Tackling • Goal keeping 4. Taking advantage of offside rule - attack and defense 5. Match officiating Referee Linesmen Table officials Play field preparation guide/organizer REFERENCESFootball 1. Lau, S.K., Encyclopedia of Football, Delhi : Sport Pub., 1995. 2. N. Kumar, Play and Learn Football, New Delhi : K.S.K, 2003. 3. Reilly, T., Science and Football, London: E.N. Sport Ltd., 1988. 4. Sharma, O.P., Teaching and Coaching –Football, Delhi : Khel S.K., 2001. 5. Shellito, K., Personal Best Football, London: William Collins & Sons, 1988. 6. Thani, Yograj, Coaching Successfully Football, New Delhi: K.S.K, 2002. 7. Williams, J., The Roots of Football, London, 1988. 8. Wirhed, R., Training to Win Football, Europ : Wolfe Pub., 1992. 133
  • 134. PAPER NO. – III (iii) Module-III GAME OF SPECIALIZATION – GYMNASTICSUNIT-I PLANNING AND PERIODIZATION OF TRAINING IN GYMNASTICS 1.1 Planning i. Annual plan ii. Long term plan – aims and contents of training methods and means of training o Periodisation of training for different events Single Periodisation Double Periodisation Multi Periodisation 1.2 Aims and contents of trainings in various periods, Elements in different periodsUNIT-II SCHEDULE OF TRAINING AND PLANNING FOR COMPETITION 2.1 Training schedules Daily schedules Weekly schedules Monthly schedules 2.2 Planning for competition Meaning and concept Preparation for competition schedule Order of events Sequence of gymnastUNIT-III BIOMECHANICAL PRINCIPLES AND THEIR APPLICATION IN GYMNASTICS 3.1 Newton’s laws of motion and their application 3.2 Body levers and their application 3.3 Linear and angular momentum 3.4 Centripetal and centrifugal forcesUNIT-IV CODE OF POINTS FOR ARTISTIC GYMNASTICS 4.1 Code of points for men Artistic Gymnastics o Evaluation of an exercise routine on : Floor exercise Pommel horse Roman rings Parallel bar Horizontal bar Vaulting table Tables of difficulty on : Floor exercise Pommel horse Roman rings Parallel bars Horizontal bar Table vaults 4.2 Code of points for women artistic gymnastics i. Evaluation of exercise on : a. Floor exercise b. Uneven bars c. Balance beam d. Table vault Tables of difficulty on : o Floor exercise o Uneven bars 134
  • 135. o Balance beam o Table vaultsUnit-V THEORY OF : 5.1 Teaching and training of advance elements on all men and women apparatus Floor exercises (men & women) Pommel horse Roman rings Parallel bars/uneven bars Table vaults (men & women) Horizontal bar Balancing beam 5.2 Pedagogic practice Warm-up exercises and class organization Teaching, training and coaching of basic and advance elements on all apparatus (men & women) Officiating 5.3 Assignments/Projects Prepare a budgetary proposal for purchase of gymnastics equipment Organization of a competition/seminar/workshop/clinic at school/district/state level 5.4 Project on research in gymnastics 5.5 Coaching lessonsPRACTICALS1. Teaching and training of advance elements on all men and women apparatus i. Floor exercises (men & women) ii. Pommel horse iii. Roman rings iv. Parallel bars/uneven bars v. Table vaults (men & women) vi. Horizontal bar vii. Balancing beam2. Pedagogic practice i. Warm-up exercises and class organization ii. Teaching, training and coaching of basic and advance elements on all apparatus (men & women) iii. Officiating3. Assignments/Projects i. Prepare a budgetary proposal for purchase of gymnastics equipment ii. Organization of a competition/seminar/workshop/clinic at school/district/state level4. Project on research in gymnastics5. Coaching lessons REFERENCESGymnastics 1. Chakraborty, S. and Sharma, Lalit, Fundamental of Gymnastics, N.D. D.V.S. Pub., 1995. 2. Chakraborty, S., Fundamental of Gymnastics, New Delhi: DVS Pub, 1995. 3. Chakraborty, S., Womens Gymnastics, Delhi : Friends Pub., 1998. 4. Code of Points Trampoline Gymnastics, Federation Int. De Gymnasics, 2005. 5. Derry, G., Personal Best Gymnastics, London : Willionm Colliv ., 1988. 6. Federation Internationale Gymnastics, Federation Int. De Gymnasics, 2006. 7. Harvey, F.J., Physical Exercises & Gymnastics, ND: Khel Sahitya, 1998. 8. Jain, R., Play and Learn Gymnastics, Khel Sahitaya Kendra, 2005. 9. Jain, R., Play and Learn Gymnastics, New Delhi: K.S.K, 2003. 10. Pearson, D., Play The Game Gymnastics, Britain : Ward Lock, 1991. 135
  • 136. 11. Smither, Graham, Behing The Scence of Gymnastics, London, 1980.12. Turoff, Fred, Artistic Gymnastics, U.S.A : C. Brown, 1991. 136
  • 137. PAPER NO. – III (iii) Module-III GAME OF SPECIALIZATION – HANDBALL UNIT-I ORGANISATION 1.1 Selection of a team and conduct of a camp 1.2 Playfield technology planning, construction and maintenance of the handball court 1.3 Conduct of a tournament 1.4 Short term and long term planning for organisation of a competition 1.5 Report writing, photography, analysis and commentary UNIT-II MATCH ANALYSIS 2.1 Evaluation of players performance during matches 2.2 Video analysis of skills and techniques 2.3 Assessment of prospective opponents UNIT-III OFFICIATING 3.1 Duties and responsibilities of officials 3.2 Mechanism of officiating and scoring UNIT-IV MANAGEMENT 4.1 Team management during competitions 4.2 Information and publicity concerning the competition 4.3 Office management – correspondence and maintenance of records 4.4 Facility management – quality control of equipment and player’s kit 4.5 Risk management - medical check-up, medical aid and insurance 4.6 Personnel management – interpersonal and inter-personnel communication skills UNIT-V MARKETING AND PLAYER PROFILE 5.1 Event identification and profile development of the event 5.2 Projection of the event and marketing strategy – pamphlets, door to door, newspaper, electronic media 5.3 Writing press release and reports 5.4 Sponsor identification, fund-raising 5.5 Building of player portfolio, preparing/drawing of a contract and understanding of laws REFERENCESHandball 1. Jain, D., Play & Learn Handball, New Delhi, Khel Sahitya Kendra, 2003. 2. Kumar Ashok, Handball, New Delhi, Discovery Publishing House, 1999. 3. Lohar, A.R., Handball Basic Technology Bombay, The Marine Sports Publishing Division, 1998. 4. Schmottlach, N., Mcmanama, J., Physical Education Handbook. 9th Edition, London, Allyn & Bacon, 1997. 137
  • 138. PAPER NO. – III (iii) Module-III GAME OF SPECIALIZATION – HOCKEYUNIT-I ORGANISATION 1.1 Selection of a team and conduct of a camp 1.2 Playfield technology - planning, construction and maintenance of a hockey field 1.3 Conduct of a tournament 1.4 Short term and long term - planning for content of a competition 1.5 Report writing, photography, analysis and commentaryUNIT-II MATCH ANALYSIS 2.1 Evaluation of player performance during matches 2.2 Video - analysis of skills and techniques 2.3 Assessment of prospective opponentsUNIT-III OFFICIATING 3.1 Duties and responsibilities of officials 3.2 Mechanism of officiating and scoringUNIT-IV MANAGEMENT 4.1 Managing during competitions 4.2 Information and publicity concerning the competition 4.3 Office management – correspondence and maintenance of records 4.4 Facility management – quality control of equipment and player’s kit 4.5 Risk management - medical check up, medical aid and insurance 4.6 Personnel management – interpersonal and inter personnel communication skillsUNIT-V MARKETING AND PLAYER PROFILE 5.1 Event identification and event profile development 5.2 Projection of the event and marketing strategy – pamphlets, door - door, newspaper, electronic media 5.3 Writing press release and reports 5.4 Sponsor identification, fund raising 5.5 Building of player portfolio, preparing/drawing of a contract and understanding of lawsPRACTICALS 1. Applied tactics of defense – positioning by a defender, defensive attacker, interchanging of position 2. Attacking tactics - shooting and heading at goal, place changing, special method-attack with two centre forward 3. Refining of skills a. Kicking b. Receiving c. Heading d. Dribbling e. Tackling f. Goal - keeping 4. Taking advantage of offside rule - attack and defense 5. Match officiating a. Referee b. Linesmen c. Table Officials d. Play field preparation guide / organizer REFERENCESHockey 1. Dubey, H.C. Hockey, New Delhi, Discovery Publishing House, 1999 2. International Hockey Federation, Rules of the Game of Hockey with Guidance for Players and Umpires. India, International Hockey Federation, 2003. 3. Jain, D., Hockey Skills & Rules New Delhi, khel Sahitya Kendra, 2003. 4. Narang, P., Play & Learn Hockey, Khel Sahitya Kendra, New Delhi, 2003 5. Thani Yograj., Coaching Successfully Hockey, Delhi, Sports Publication, 2002. 138
  • 139. PAPER NO. – III (iii) Module-III GAME OF SPECIALIZATION – JUDOUNIT-I RULES, REGULATIONS AND INTERPRETATIONS 1.1 Specified by the Judo Federation of India 1.2 Specified by the International Judo Federation 1.3 Latest changes and developments in rules and regulations, techniques and tactics, officiating and coaching etc.UNIT-II OFFICIATING AND COACHING 2.1 Qualifications, qualities and responsibilities of a coach, philosophy of coaching 2.2 Qualifications and responsibilities/functions of technical officials 2.3 Protocols of referees, judges, technical officials 2.4 Role of sport psychologists, sport physiotherapists, fitness trainers and doctorsUNIT-III ORGANISATION OF THE COMPETITION 3.1 Planning for the competition 3.2 Selection of men, material and management 3.3 Concluding the competition – submission of accounts, preparing report 3.4 Protocols and ceremoniesUNIT-IV PROFESSIONAL PREPARATION FOR 4.1 Coaching a team 4.2 Organising a competition 4.3 Officiating in a competition 4.4 Conducting a workshop/seminar/clinicUNIT-V COACHING LESSONS 5.1 Guidelines for preparing a coaching lesson in Judo 5.2 Preparation of coaching lesson-plans 5.3 Use of teaching aidsPRACTICALS 1. Planning for competitions 2. Organisation of a competition/seminar/workshop/clinic 3. Project on research in judo/record of events 4. Coaching lessons REFERENCESJudo 1. Caffary, B., Skilful Judo, London : A & C Black, 1992. 2. Dando, J., Play The Game Judo, Great Britain: Blandford, 1994. 3. Harrison, E.J., Coaching Successfully Judo, Delhi: Sports, 2002. 4. Harrison, J., Teaching & Coaching Judo, ND: Sport Pub., 1998. 5. Holme, P., Get to Gripe With Judo, London : Blandford, 1995. 6. Holme, Peter, Competition Judo, London: Ward Lock, 1996. 7. Jain, D., Play and Learn Judo, New Delhi : K.S.K, 2003. 8. Kumar, Mukesh, Action Judo, Delhi : Sport Publication, 1994. 9. Marwood, D., Critical Judo, ND : A.I.T.B.S. Pub., 1995. 139
  • 140. PAPER NO. – III (iii) Module-III GAME OF SPECIALIZATION – KABADDIUNIT-I ORGANIZATION 1.1 Selection of a team and conduct of a camp 1.2 Playfield technology planning, construction and maintenance of Kabaddi court 1.3 Conduct of a tournamentp 1.4 Short-term and long - term planning for organization of a competition 1.5 Report writing, photography, analysis and commentaryUNIT-II MATCH ANALYSIS 2.1 Evaluation of players performance during matches 2.2 Video analysis of skills and techniques 2.3 Assessment of prospective opponentsUNIT-III OFFICIATING 3.1 Duties and responsibilities of officials 3.2 Mechanism of officiating and scoringUNIT-IV MANAGEMENT 4.1 Managing during competitions 4.2 Information and publicity concerning the competition 4.3 Office management – correspondence and maintenance of records 4.4 Facility management – quality control of equipment and player’s kit 4.5 Risk management - medical check up, medical aid and insurance 4.6 Personnel management – interpersonal communication skillsUNIT-V MARKETING AND PLAYER PROFILE 5.1 Event identification and event profile development 5.2 Projection of the event and marketing strategy – pamphlets, door-to-door, newspaper, electronic media 5.3 Writing press release and reports 5.4 Sponsor identification, fund raising 5.5 Building of player portfolio, preparing (drawing) a contract and understanding of laws REFERENCESKabaddi 1. Rao, C. V., Kabaddi, New Delhi: Oxford Press, 1982. 2. Rao, E.P., Modern Coaching in Kabaddi, D.V.S.Pub, 1994. 3. Rao, C.V., Kabaddi; Native Indian Sports, Patiala Nis Publisher, 1983. 4. Rao, E.P., Modern Coaching in Kabaddi D.U.S.Pub, 1994 140
  • 141. PAPER NO. – III (iii) Module-III GAME OF SPECIALIZATION – KHO-KHOUNIT-I ORGANISATION 1.1 Selection of a team and conduct of a camp 1.2 Playfield technology planning, construction and maintenance of Kho-kho court 1.3 Conduct of a tournament 1.4 Short-term and long-term planning for organization of a competition 1.5 Report writing, photography, analysis and commentaryUNIT-II MATCH ANALYSIS 2.1 Evaluation of player’s performance during matches 2.2 Video analysis of skills and techniques 2.3 Assessment of prospective opponentsUNIT-III OFFICIATING 3.1 Duties and responsibilities of officials 3.2 Mechanism of officiating and scoringUNIT-IV MANAGEMENT 4.1 Managing during competitions 4.2 Information and publicity concerning the competition 4.3 Office management – correspondence and maintenance of records 4.4 Facility management – quality control of equipment and player’s kit 4.5 Risk management - medical check up, medical aid and insurance 4.6 Personnel management – interpersonal communication skillsUNIT-V MARKETING AND PLAYER PROFILE 5.1 Event identification and event profile development 5.2 Projection of the event and marketing strategy – pamphlets, door - door, newspaper, electronic media 5.3 Writing press release and reports 5.4 Sponsor identification, fund raising 5.5 Building of player portfolio, preparing (drawing) a contract and understanding of laws REFERENCESKho-Kho 1. Chakrabarty, G., Kho - Kho Aveloken, Delhi, Khel Sahitya Kendra, 2002. 2. Panday, L., Kho - Kho Sarvaswa, New Delhi Metropolitan, 1982. 141
  • 142. PAPER NO. – III (iii) Module-III GAME OF SPECIALIZATION – TABLE TENNISUNIT-I RULES, REGULATIONS AND INTERPRETATIONS 1.1 As specified by the Table Tennis Federation of India (TTFI) 1.2 As per the International Table Tennis Federation (ITTF) 1.3 Latest developments 1.4 Latest amendments 1.5 InterpretationsUNIT-II OFFICIATING AND COACHING 2.1 Duties/responsibilities, qualifications and qualities of a coach 2.2 Philosophy of coaching 2.3 Qualifications and responsibilities/functions of technical officials 2.4 Protocols of referees, judges, umpires 2.5 Role of sports psychologists, sports physiotherapists and fitness trainersUNIT-III ORGANISATION OF THE COMPETITION 3.1 Planning for the competition 3.2 Selection of men, material and management 3.3 Concluding the competition – submission of accounts, preparing report 3.4 Protocols and ceremoniesUNIT-IV PROFESSIONAL PREPARATION FOR : 4.1 Coaching a team 4.2 Organizing a competition 4.3 Officiating in a competition 4.4 Conducting a workshop/seminar/clinic 4.5 Professional aspects of Table TennisUNIT-V COACHING LESSONS 5.1 Preparing coaching lessons in Table Tennis 5.2 Use of teaching aids 5.3 Conduct of regular coaching 5.4 Concluding aspects of the coaching lesson 5.5 AssimilationPRACTICALS 1. Planning for competitions 2. Organization of a competition/seminar/workshop/clinic 3. Project on research in Table Tennis 4. Coaching lessons REFERENCESTable Tennis 1. Jain, Deepak, Teaching and Coaching -Table Tennis, Delhi : Khel S.K., 2001. 2. Narang, P., Play & Learn Table Tennis, Khel Sahitaya Kendra, 2005. 3. Narang, P., Play and Learn Table Tennis, New Delhi: K.S.K, 2003. 4. Parker, D., Take Up Table Tennis, Springfield Books Ltd., 1989. 5. Simpson, Peter, Successful Table Tennis, London : Charles Letts, 1980. 6. Taylor, R., Sports Action-Table Tennis, London, 1989. 142
  • 143. 7. Thani, Lokesh, Skills and Tactics Table Tennis, Delhi: Sports, 1998.PAPER NO. – III (iii) Module-III GAME OF SPECIALIZATION – VOLLEYBALLUNIT-I ORGANIZATION 1.1 Selection of a team and conduct of a camp 1.2 Playfield technology - planning, construction and maintenance of the Volleyball court 1.3 Conduct of a tournament 1.4 Short-term and long-term planning for organization of a competition 1.5 Report writing, photography, analysis and commentaryUNIT-II MATCH ANALYSIS 2.1 Evaluation of player’s performance during matches 2.2 Video analysis of skills and techniques 2.3 Assessment of prospective opponentsUNIT-III OFFICIATING 3.1 Duties and responsibilities of officials 3.2 Mechanism of officiating and scoringUNIT-IV MANAGEMENT 4.1 Managing during competitions 4.2 Information and publicity concerning the competition 4.3 Office management – correspondence and maintenance of records 4.4 Facility management – quality control of equipment and player’s kit 4.5 Risk management- medical check up, medical aid and insurance 4.6 Personnel management – interpersonal communication skillsUNIT-V MARKETING AND PLAYER PROFILE 5.1 Event identification and profile development of the event 5.2 Projection of the event and marketing strategy – pamphlets, door - door, newspaper, electronic media 5.3 Writing press release and reports 5.4 Sponsor identification, fund raising 5.5 Building of player portfolio, preparing (drawing) of a contract and understanding of laws REFERENCESVolley Ball 1. American…. Program, Coaching Youth Volley Ball, Campaigon, H.K., 1996. 2. FIVB, Backcourt Spiking in Modern Volley Ball, Chennai : FIVB, 1996. 3. Saggar, S.K., Cosco Skills Stactics - Volley Ball, Delhi : Sport Publication, 1994. 4. Scates, A.E., Winning Volley Ball, WC Brown, 1993. 143
  • 144. PAPER NO. – III (iii) Module-III GAME OF SPECIALIZATION – YOGAUNIT-I RULES AND REGULATIONS FOR YOGA CHAMPIONSHIPS : 1.1 State, national, international, SGFI, AIU etc.UNIT-II OFFICIATING AND COACHING : 2.1 Qualifications, qualities and responsibilities of a coach 2.2 Duties/responsibilities of technical official 2.3 Scoring system and judgment criteria 2.4 Protocols for referees, judges and officialsUNIT-III ORGANISATION OF YOGA COMPETITION : 3.1 Structure and organisation of yoga competition 3.2 Preparation, execution and closing of the competition 3.3 Protocols and ceremoniesUNIT-IV MEDITATION : 4.1 Different techniques of meditation and their practice on shat chakras, preksha and leshya dhyana, and vipashyana, concentrating on music (nad), and tratak 4.2 Importance or meditation : physical, mental, social, emotional and spiritualUNIT-V COACHING LESSONS : 5.1 Guidelines for preparing coaching lessons in Yoga 5.2 Preparation of coaching lesson-plans 5.3 Use of teaching aidsPRACTICALS 1. Planning for a Yoga competition 2. Organisation of a Yoga competition 3. Project on researches in Yoga 4. Officiating in Yoga competitions 5. Coaching lessons REFERENCESYoga 1. Anand, Omprarkash. Yog Dawra Kaya Kalp, Kanpur, Sewasth Sahitya Perkashan, 2001. 2. Sarin, N., Yoga Dawara Ragoon Ka Upchhar, Khel Sahitya Kendra, 2003. 3. Sri, Swami Rama, Breathing, Rishikesh, Sadhana Mandir Trust, 2001. 4. Swami, Ram., Yoga & Married Life, Rishikesh Sadhana Mandir Trust, 2000. 5. Swami, Veda Bharti., Yoga, Polity, Economy and Family, Rishikesh Sadhana Mandir Trust, 2000. 144
  • 145. PAPER NO. – VII (a) OPTIONAL GROUP-I FUNDAMENTALS OF SPORT SOCIOLOGYUNIT-I INTRODUCTION TO SPORT SOCIOLOGY 1.1 Meaning and concept of sport sociology 1.2 Importance of its study 1.3 Current status of sport sociology in India and abroad. 1.4 Trends in sport sociology. 1.5 Theories in sociology 1.6 Theories about sports and society (structured and functionalism; 1.7 Critical, conflict, gender and interactionism theories) 1.8 A comparative analysis of sociological theories in sportsUNIT-II SOCIETY AND CULTURE 2.1 Definition and concept of society 2.2 Sports in human societies (ancient, feudal, capitalistic and socialistic). 2.3 Sport as a part of social, structural and functional system 2.4 Sociological differences in ancient and modern sports. 2.5 Meaning and concept of culture-sub-culture (Material and immaterial) 2.6 Sport as a cultural phenomenon 2.7 Cultural symbols in sportUNIT-III STRATIFICATION AND SOCIALIZATION 3.1 Definition of stratification (classes, caste, age, gender in sports) 3.2 Stratification and social mobility 3.3 Stratification and popularity of sport 3.4 Theories of socialization and sport 3.5 Facilitation and debilitation of sport socialization in genders. 3.6 Desociolization from sportUNIT-IV SPORT AND GENDER 4.1 Definition and theories of gender 4.2 Gender disparity and discrimination, and equity 4.3 Gender involvement in sports and masculinity 4.4 Deviance & aggregation in players 4.5 Spectator, fans and violence 4.6 Influence of spectators in dynamics of sportsUNIT-V COMMUNICATION AND RESEARCH METHODOLOGY 5.1 Mass communication and its implication in sports 5.2 Commercialization in sports 5.3 Amateurism versus professionalism 5.4 Recent social research methodologies (phenomenology, Hermeneutics, semiotics) 5.5 Qualitative and quantitative research 5.6 Participant observation and interview method in research 5.7 Impact of privatization and globalization on sportsPRACTICALS & ASSIGNEMENT:1 Sociometric, cultural determination & socio economic status2 Analyzing sports programmes programmes and policies in India with special reference structural, conflict, gender and critical theories.3 Evaluate the level of commercial aspects prevailing in different sports in India4 Critically analyze the topics & methods used in previous session5 How to identify and understand the themes in qualitative research. 145
  • 146. REFERENCESSociology 1. Bhusan, V. and Sachdeva, An Introduction to Sociology, Delhi: Kitab, 2003. 2. IGNOU, The Study of Society - Understanding Sociology, Delhi - IGNOU, 2007. 3. Inkeles, A. Ed., What Is Sociology, ND : Prentice Hall, 1997. 4. Jain, Rachna, Sports Sociology, New Delhi: KSK, 2005. 5. Kanwal Jeet, S., Sport Sociology, ND : Friends Pub., 2000. 6. Mitchell, G.D. Ed., Dictionary of Sociology, U.K : Routledge, 1999. 7. Sharma, R. N, Urban Sociology, ND : Surjeet Pub., 1993. 8. Singh, Bhupinder, Sports Sociology, New Delhi : Friends, 2004. 9. Turner, B., Cambridge Dictionary of Sociology, U.K., Cambridge, U.N. Press., 2006 10. SPORT IN SOCIETY, ISSUES AND CONTROVERSIES by Joy. J. Coaplay. Mcgraw Hill International edition 1997 11. THE SOCIAL SIGNIFICANCE OF SPORT B.D.Mc Pherson, J.E.Curtis, and J.W. Loy Human Kinetics books Champaign Illinois U.S.A.1989 12. UNDERTAKING SPORT – AN INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIOLOGY AND CULTURAL ANALYSIS OF SPORT J.Hosue, A. Tomlinson, G. Whannel, Routbdge, New York 1999 13. SPORT AND SOCIAL SYSTEMS, A GUIDE TO THE ANALYSIS PROBLEMS LITRETURE by J.W. Loy, B.D. Mc pherson , G. Kenyon, Addison wesley publishing company Messachuslls 1978 14. WORLD WIDE TRENDS IN YOUTH SPORT, P.D. Knop, L.M. Engstrow, B. Sbisstadd M.R.Uleiss Human Kinetics 1996 15. POWER AND RADIOLOGY IN AMERICAN SPORT, A CRITICAL PERSPECTIVE, G.H Sege Human Kinetics 1998 16. SOCIOLOGY, THE BASICS by M.Abrow Roulledge London 2001 17. SAMAAJSHASTRA AVDHARANAAYE AUR SIDHAANT, Dr. J.P. Singh, Prentis Hall of India New Delhi 1999 18. SAMAAJSHASTRA KE SIDHAANT, Writer Vidhyabhushan, Dr. D.R. Sachdeva, Kitaab Mahal Ellahabad 1979 19. Sociology Basic concepts by H.K. Rawat, Rawat Publication 2007 20. Learning Experience in Sociology of Sport by Lusan L. Greendoefor, C.A. Hasbroob, Human Kinetics Books Champaign, Illions U.S.A. 1991 21. Moping Sense of Sports, by Ellis Cashmore Routeedge, New York, 2000 22. Dictionary of sociology, Penguine reference 23. Social issues in Sports by Ronald B. Woods Human Kinetics 2007 24. Stanly eitzan and George H. Sage, Sociology of world American Sports, Bastow, M. A: W C B/Mcgraw Hill 1997 25. Sports in Contemporary Society: An ethnology worth publications, New York-2001 26. Sport and Society by N.I. panomaryow, progress publication Moscow-1981 27. Sport and Social Order: Contributions to the sociology of sports by Donald. W. Ball and John W. Joy, Addison Wesley Publishing company 1975 28. Sport and Politics- Edited by G. Redmond Human Kinetics publishers, In Champaign, Illinois 1986 29. Women in Sports, a selected biography by M. Shoebridge, Mansell publishing Ltd. London and New York 1987 30. Theory, Sport and Society by J. Maguire and K. Young JAI, Elsevier Ltd. 2005 31. Sport in South Asian Society Past and Present edited by B. Majuardar and J. A. Morgan Reutledge, New York and London 2005 32. Social aspect of Sport by E.E. Snyder and Prentis Hall Jersey 1978 33. Sports beyond the iron curtain by freeman. S. and Boyes R. London Protcus Publishing Company 1980 34. Sport Spectators by A. Gultmann Colombia University, New York 1986 146
  • 147. PAPER NO. – VII (b) OPTIONAL GROUP-I FUNDAMENTALS OF SPORT PSYCHOLOGYCOURCE OBJECTIVE: - Provide concrete understanding of techniques for overall behavioral developmentof an individual so that the physical help in solving the problems of an individual.UNIT- I 1. INTRODUCTION TO SPORT PSYCHOLOGY 1.1 Meaning and scope of sport psychology 1.2 Divisions of sport psychology 1.3 Place of sports psychology in sports sciences heirachy. 1.4 Importance of sport psychology 2. SENSORY PERCEPTUAL PROCESS 2.1 Meaning, mechanism and stages of sensory perceptual process 2.2 Classification of senses and sensory perceptual process. 2.3 Factors in perception 2.4 Implication of sensory-perceptual process in exercise and sportUNIT-II 1. MOTOR DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING 1.1 Understanding motor development and motor learning 1.2 Motor development and learning in infants and children. 1.3 Factors affecting motor development and motor learning 2. PSYCHOLOGICAL SKILLS AND THEIR INFLUENCE ON SPORTS PERFORMANCE 2.1 Attention 2.2 Concentration 2.3 Confidence 2.4 ImageryUNIT-III 1. PERSONALITY 1.1 Concept and definition of personality 1.2 Modern perspective, trait, humanistic, social cognitive and biological theories) 1.3 Dynamics of personality in activity and sport 2. ANXIETY IN SPORT 2.1 Concept, definition and types of anxiety 2.2 Anxiety and arousal 2.3 Effect of anxiety on physical performanceUNIT-IV 1. MOTIVATION IN ACTIVITY AND SPORT 1.1 Concept, definition and types of motivation 1.2 Theories of motivation (drive, need and instinct theories) 1.3 Motivation in activity and sports 147
  • 148. 2. PSYCHOLOGICAL PREPARATION AND COMPETITION 2.1 Phenomenon of competition sport 2.2 Psychological preparation for competitionUNIT-V SOCIO-PSYCHOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF ACTIVITY AND SPORT 2 SOCIO-CULTURE FACTORS AFFECTING PERFORMANCE 1.1 Social ethics and sport 1.2 Attitude towards activity and sport 1.3 Team (group) cohesion 3 SPECTATORS AND PERFORMANCE 2.1 Types of spectators- crowd, fans 2.2 Facilitation and debilitative effects of spectators on performance.PRACTICALSTo administer the following tests, and process and interpret their data. 1. Eysenck personality questionnaire (EPQ). 2. Sport competitive anxiety test-1 3. Depth perception test 4. Reaction time SUGGESTED READINGS1 Alderman, R.B Psychological behaviour in Sports (Philadelphia London, Saunders Company).2 But, Lusen Dorrcas, Psychological of Sports (Network Van Nostra and Reinhold company) Edn.3 Cratty, Brayant. J. Movement Behaviour and Motor Learning (Philadelphia Lea and Febiger, Edn 34 Cratty, Brayant. J Psychology and Physical Activity (New Jersey Englewood Cliffs, Prentice Hall Inc.5 Gold Stein and Joffery H. (Ed) Sports Games and Play Social and Psychological Veiw Points (Lowerence Eribanm Associates Publishers R.J. 148
  • 149. PAPER NO. – VII (c) OPTIONAL GROUP-I FUNDAMENTALS OF HEALTH EDUCATIONUNIT-I HEALTH EDUCATION 1.1 Meaning and definition 1.2 Importance of health education 1.3 Need and scope of health education 1.4 Method and media of health education 1.5 Health education in prevention of non-communicable diseaseUNIT-II HEALTH 2.1 Meaning, definition and dimension of Health 2.2 Interrelationship among various dimensions 2.3 Factors effecting health 2.4 Substance abuse (smoking, tobacco, chewing etc) 2.5 Preventive measures and rehabilitationUNIT-III COMMUNICABLE DISEASE 3.1 Meaning and concepts of communicable disease 3.2 Source of infection, reservoir of infection, susceptible host, incubation period carriers etc 3.3 Mode of spread infection, 3.4 Prevention of communicable diseases 3.5 Cause, symptoms, and signs of cholera, STD, AIDS, Typhoid, whooping cough, tuberculosis and malaria, hepatitisUNIT-IV SCHOOL HEALTH SERVICES 4.1 Need and importance SHS 4.2 Components school health services 4.3 School health programme 4.4 Guidance and counsellingUNIT-V FITNESS & WELLNESS 5.1 Definition, meaning of fitness & wellness 5.2 Components of wellness 5.3 Hygiene - meaning, need & importance 5.4 Nutrition – macro & micronutrients 5.5 Weight management/obesity controlPRACTICALS 1. Collection of the educational materials (posters, pamphlets, CDs etc) 2. Preparation of school health programmes 3. Collection of vaccination/immunization data of children under - 5 4. Organizing the health awareness programmes 5. Determination of status of weight HT & WT approach BMI approach Percentage of fat RECOMMENDED BOOKS:1 Even,A WILLA EVERYDAY SAFETY Chicago lyors & carnahao 19902 FIRST AID TO THE INJURED. New Delhi: st. john ambulance association, 19893 Ghosh B.N.A TREATISE ON PREVENTIVE & SOCIAL MEDICINE, Calcutta: scientific4 HYGIENIC AND PUBLIC HEALTH AND PUBLIC HEALTH, 19915 Hanlon john. J.PRINCIPLES OF PUBLIC HEALTH ADMINISTERATION, 19926 Jonson, ALTH IN ACTION. Halt bhincment and Winston, 19777 MOSS ET AL HEALTH EDUCATION, NATIONAL EDUCATION, education association of U.T.A.19868 Nemir. A. THE SCHOOL HEALTH EDUCATION, new York: Harper and brother, 19919 Obertenterfer, D.SCHOOL EDUCATION , new York: Harper and brother, 199210 Park, J.E.Park K. TEXT BOOK OF PREVENTIVE AND SOCIAL MEDICINE, 199111 ROYAPPA, DR.DAISY JOSEPH AND DR.L.K Govinder julu SAFETY EDUCATION 199612 Stack, harbet j. duke ELKOW EDUCATION FOR SAFE LIVING Englewood cliffs: new jersey prentice hall-inc 199113 SAFE SCHOOL (EDUCATION PAMPHLET NUMBER 53) London: her majesty’s S. stationery office.14 Turner, C.E THE SCHOOL HEALTH AND HEALTH EDUCATION St. Louis, The C.V. Mossy Co. 1976 149
  • 150. 15 Turner G.L. PERSONAL AND COMMUNITY HEALTH 1990 150
  • 151. PAPER NO. – VII (d) OPTIONAL GROUP-I FUNDAMENTALS OF SPORT BIO-MECHANICSUNIT - I THE STUDY AND ANALYSIS OF HUMAN MOVEMENT Kinesiology and Biomechanics: Areas of study, Approaches for studying movement, Importance of biomechanics in Physical Education and Sports Research in and out of the Laboratory INTRODUCTION TO BIOMECHANICS INSTRUMENTATION Overview of instrumentation and its uses Clocks and times Stroboscopy Cinematography and computer assisted analysis Videography and computer assisted analysis Force measuring instrumentation Accelerometry Electorogoniometry Electromyography Using micro computers for collecting and analyzing dataUNIT-II LOOKING AT MOVEMENT: SOME MECHANICAL CONCEPTS Types of motion Distance and Displacement Speed, Velocity and uniform acceleration Acceleration and uniform acceleration Force and momentum Pressure Mass and weight Gravity Center of gravity Work Power Energy Forces and Movement Forces acting on a system Reaction forces Friction force Centripetal and centripetal forces Elastic force Internal and external forces Motive and Resistive forces Force diagrams and Vectors Torque and moment of inertia The effect of two or more torques on a system Vector Composition of torque Torque and the body’s center of gravity location Other Kinetics Lever, types of levers and their mechanical advantage and disadvantage with special reference to physical education and sports application. 151
  • 152. Friction, types of friction and their mechanical advantage and disadvantage with special reference to physical education and sports application.UNIT-III BODY BALANCE AND STABILITY CONTROL Balance Equilibrium and stability Controlling balance in static positions Controlling balance during movement NEWTONS LAWS OF MOTION Law of Inertia (Linear Motion) Law of moment of Inertia (Angular Motion) Law of Momentum (Linear Motion) Law of Angular Momentum (Angular Motion) Law of Action and Reaction (Linear Motion) Law of Action and Reaction (Angular Motion)UNIT-IV OBSERVING AND ANALYZING PERFORMANCE The Nature of skills Overall performance objective of skill The analysis process Projectile – Related Activities Properties of motion related to projecting for vertical distance Projecting for vertical distance with a horizontal component Projecting for horizontal distance Projecting for accuracy Principles derived from Projectile Motion FLUID FORCES Fluid drag force Fluid lift force Application of Arrangement in Sport Effective of dragon the body and objects in sport Effects of life in sport Life force produced by spin: The Magnus effect. Application of Hydrodynamics in Swimming Buoyancy & flotation Resistive forces in swimming skills Propulsive forces in swimming skills Swimming speed & efficiency UNIT-V STRUCTURE OF MOTOR ACTION Structure of cyclic & acidic motor action and movement combination Functional relationship of different phases of motor action Qualities of Motor Movements 152
  • 153. Movement rhythm Movement coupling Movement flow Movement precision Movement amplitude Biomechanical principles: Principles of initial force Principles of optimum path of acceleration Principles of conservation of momentum. Principles of Action and ReactionPRACTICAL 1. Development of a Velocity time graph from a cinematographically and/video system and/photo specially recorded sprint and / Vertical jump and / analysis movement. 2. Determination of centre of Gravity by Reaction Board Method. 3. Determination of centre of Gravity by Joint- point – method. 4. Determination of centre of Gravity of Main- point method. 5. Determination of combined center of Gravity (joint-point method). 6. Demonstration of the Principle conservation of Augular momentum. 7. Demonstration of Principle of action and reaction. 8. Biomechanically analysis of a given technique. (Qualitative) REFERENCES 1. Gowitzke, B.A. and Milner, M. (1988). Scientific Bases of Human Movement. (3rd. ed.) i. Baltimore: Williams and Wilkins. 2. Grimshaw, Paul., Lees, Adrian., Flower, Neil.,&Burden, Adrian. Sports and i. Exercise Biomechanics.Taylor & Francis. 3. Groves, R and Camaine, D. (1983). Concepts in Kinesiology. (2nd. ed.). Philadelphia: Saunders College Publishing. 4. Hall, Susan J. Basic Biomechanics. Mosby Year Book 5. Hay, J. (1978). The biomechanics of sport techniques. (2nd. ed.). Englewood Cliffs: Prentice- Hall. 6. Hay, J. & Reid, J. (1982). The Anatomical and Mechanical Bases of Human Motion. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall. 7. Luttegens, Kathryn., Deutsch, Helga., Hamilton, Nancy. Kinesiology-Scientific Basis of Human Motion. 8th Ed, Brown & Bench mark. 8. Nordin, M. & Frankel, V. (1990). Basic Biomechanics of the Musculoskeletal System, Philadelphia: Lea & Febiger. 9. Northrip, J., Logan, G. & McKinney, W. (1983). Analysis of Sport Motion. (3rd. ed). Dubuque: William C. Brown. 10. Rasch, P. (1989). Kinesiology and Applied Anatomy. Philadelphia: Lea & Febiger. 11. Thompson, C. (1985). Manual of Structural Kinesiology. (10th ed.). St. Louis: Times Mirror/ Mosby College Publishing. 153
  • 154. PAPER NO. – VII (e) OPTIONAL GROUP-I FUNDAMENTALS OF EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGYCOURSE DESCRIPTION: This course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of exercise physiology.Emphasis is placed on physiology of muscle action, training for fitness and performance, nutrition and bodycomposition aspects, health disorder and physical activity and fundamentals of exercise prescription andsports fitness testing.COURSE OBJECTIVES: 1. Becoming familiar with the mechanism that explains the physiology of muscle action. 2. Examining the significance of physical activity and training for fitness and health promotion. 3. Understanding the fundamentals of nutrition and body composition for fitness and performance. 4. Role of physical activity in prevention and treatment of health disordersUNIT-1 PHYSIOLOGY OF MUSCLE ACTION 1.1 Neuromuscular Concepts Of Muscle Action. Structure and function of Skeletal muscle Contractile mechanism Neural transmission and Motor response Muscular adaptation to training 1.2 Metabolic and Hormonal Control: Energy systems during rest and exercise Measuring energy expenditure Nature of hormone action Metabolic adaptation to trainingUNIT-2 EXERCISE AND TRAINING FOR FITNESS AND PERFORMANCE 2.1 Physical Activity and Health and Fitness Role of physical activity in disease prevention Behavior supporting fitness and health Elements of total fitness (wellness) 2.2 Training for Sport and Fitness: Principles of Training Overtraining, under training/ optimum training Benefits of resistance training Adaptation to aerobic and anaerobic trainingUNIT-3 NUTRITION, BODY COMPOSITION FOR FITNESS AND PERFORMANCE 3.1 Nutritional Aspect of Fitness And Performance: Balance diet Water and electrolyte balance Athlete’s diet Physiological basis of diet for sedentary, physically active and sports person. 3.2 Optimal Body Composition For Fitness And Performance: Concepts of body composition Assessment of body composition Body composition for optimal health and fitness Body composition and sports performanceUNIT-4 HEALTH DISORDERS AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY 4.1 Cardiovascular Disease And Physical Activity: Concepts of cardiovascular disease Cardiovascular disease risk factors Reducing risks through physical activity 154
  • 155. 4.2 Obesity, Diabetes and Physical Activity: Obesity and its causes Etiology of diabetes Role of exercise in prevention and treatment of obesity and diabetes.UNIT-V FUNDAMENTALS OF EXERCISE PRESCRIPTION AND PHYSIOLOGICAL TESTING OF SPORTMEN 5.1 Prerequisites of Exercise Prescription: Medical clearance Consent form Readiness to exercise (PAR-Q) Stop test indicators, pre exercise session preparations Monitoring exercise intensity 5.2 Sport Specific Physiological Testing Prerequisites: Pretest preparation checklist Medical examination Consent form Quality assurance and implementation Protocols for physiological assessment of players.PRACTICAL: 1. Assessment of resting physiological parameters (Heart rate, respiratory rate, blood pressure, etc) 2. Effect of selected exercise on physiological parameters 3. Testing the various components of physical fitness (Performance related and health related fitness) 4. Assessment of body composition using various techniques. REFERENCES 1. Wilmore, Jack H and Costill, David L. Physiology of Sports and Exercise. Human kinetics. 1994. 2. Maud, peter J and Froster, Carl. Physiological Assessments of Human fitness. Second edition. Human kinetics 2006. 3. Sharkey, Brian J, Gaskill, Steven E. Improve overall quality of life through better fitness and nutrition Human kinetics 2007. 4. Rowland, Thomas W.Explore the full scope of physiologic responses to exercise in youth. Human kinetics.2005. 5. Gore, Christopher John. Physiological Tests for Elite Athlete. Australian Sports Lommission. Human Kinetics.2000. 155
  • 156. PAPER NO. – VII (f) OPTIONAL GROUP-I FUNDAMENTALS OF SPORT MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATIONUNIT-I MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION 1.1 Definition, meaning and concept of sports management and administration 1.2 Nature, scope and principles 1.3 Functions of sports management 1.4 Profile of a successful administrator/managerUNIT-II FACILITIES AND FINANCE MANAGEMENT 2.1 Planning and development of facilities 2.2 Developing multi purpose sports facilities 2.3 Management of safety measures 2.4 Fundraising, accounting and budgetingUNIT-III LEADERSHIP 3.1 Leadership types and traits of a successful leader 3.2 Time management 3.3 Managing meetings 3.4 Personnel management and voluntary managementUNIT-IV SPECIAL SERVICES 4.1 Types of sports events 4.2 Formation of committees 4.3 Draw of fixtures, schedules and ceremonies 4.4 Reporting and evaluationUNIT-V OFFICE MANAGEMENT 5.1 Meaning and definition of office management 5.2 Elements and functions of office management 5.3 Layout of physical education department 5.4 Office correspondence REFERENCES Sport Management 1. Allen, L.A. Management & Organization. Kogakusha Co. Tokyo, 1988. 2. Hert, Renis, New Patterns of Management, McGraw Hill, 1961. 3. Sivia, G.S. Sports Management in Universities, New Delhi: A.I.U. Deen Dayal Upadhyaya Marg, 1991. 4. Sandhu, K. Sports Dynamics: Psychology, Sociology and Management 156
  • 157. PAPER NO. – IV (iii) Module-III SUBJECT SPECIALIZATION - EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGYUNIT-1 OPTIMISING PERFORMANCE IN SPORT 1.1 Body Composition and Nutrition for Sport • Body composition and its assessment - Specific gravity method, anthropometric method & use of Bio impedance, CAT, DEXA and MRI means to achieve optImal weight • Role of macro and micro nutrients in physical activity/sports. 1.2 Ergogenic Aids and Sports • Researching ergogenic aids • Pharmacological agents • Hormonal agents • Physiological agents / miscellaneous substances.UNIT-2 HEALTH AND WELLNESS IN THE LIGHT OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY/SPORTS 2. 1 Metabolic disorders and physical activity: • Elevated blood lipid & cholesterol. • High blood pressure. • Problem of bones and joints. • Diabetes. 2.2 CHD and Physical Activity • Forms of cardio-vascular diseases • Understanding the disease process (inactivity, uncontrolled diet, smoking, drinking, prolong TV watching. ) • Other risk factors • Reducing risk factors with physical activity.UNIT-3 INTRODUCTION AND GUIDELINES OF FITNESS TESTING OF NORMAL SEDENTARY SUBJECTS AND ELITE ATHLETES. 3.1 Guidelines and Purpose of Fitness Testing: Medical clearance. purpose for fitness testing Administrative guidelines for testing situation Suggestions when testing cardio-respiratory fitness Protocol guidelines Criteria for selecting cardio-respiratory fitness test. General versus sports specific testing. 3.2 Introduction to Physiological Tests for Elite Athletes Laboratory and athlete preparation Assessing quality assurance and implementation General assessment procedures Protocols for the physiological assessment of playersUNIT-4 PHYSIOLOGY OF AGING AND EXERCISE 4. 1 Gerontology: Study of Ageing • Concept and significance of studying aging in the field of physical education and sports. • Various physical, anatomical, physiological and psychological changes due to aging and its physiological basis. • Role of regular exercise/ physical activity on aging process. 4.2 Trainability and Fitness Testing: • Trainability of the older athlete. 157
  • 158. • Trainability in old sedentary normal individuals.UNIT-5 PHYSIOLOGY OF PHYSICALLY DEMANDING OCCUPATIONS 5.1 Physiological requirements of Worker in Multi-Dimensional Occupation Demand: Physical characteristics of the worker in the physiological demanding occupations Employee health and job related fitness Examination of work requirement and capacity for physically demanding job Environmental factors affecting employee performance (heat , noise, air, cold) 5.2 Worksite Exercise Program Benefits Work on the job while maintaining health Support to excel in job Population need based strategies to increase physical activityPRACTICAL 1. Assessment of body composition in sportsmen. (sport specific) 2. Assessing health related fitness in the aged population 3. Administration of the older adult fitness battery 4. Assessing fitness in employees working in physically demanding occupations REFERENCES 1. Sharkey, Brian J.Hard Work: defining Physical Work Performance Requirements 2008Human Kinetics. 2. Astrand, per- olof, Rodah, Kaare, Datil, Hans A, Stromme, Sigmund B. Textbook of Work Physiology. 4thed.2003 . Human kinetics. 3. Wilmore, Jack H and Costill, David L. Physiology of Sports and Exercise. Human kinetics. 1994. 4. Gore, Christopher John. Physiological Tests for Elite Athlete.Australian sports Commission. Human Kinetics 2000. 158
  • 159. PAPER NO. – IV (iii) Module-III SUBJECT SPECIALIZATION – SPORT BIOMECHANICS UNIT - I 1: Biomechanical Testing Protocols - General Consideration - Biomechanical Parameters and Techniques - Defining A Problem - Unites Of Measure - Definitions - Ethics And Safety - Detailed Reporting - Data Bases - Frequency Of Testing - Innovative Techniques - Strategies For Research - Conclusion And Recommendations UNIT - II 2: Kinematics (Set – I) I) Time Ii) Position Iii) Linear Displacement Iv) Linear Velocity V) Linear Acceleration Vi) Angular Displacement Vii) Angular Velocity Viii) Angular Acceleration Ix) Units Of Measurement For Kinematic Data - Purpose For Measuring - Relevance - Testing Procedure X) Cinematography And Computerized Video Analysis - Advantage - Disadvantage Xi) Single-Plate Methods - Advantage - Disadvantage Xii) Optoelectric Movement Monitoring System - Advantage - Disadvantage UNIT - III 3. Kinematics (Set – Ii) Xiii) Censors And Movement Monitoring System Xiv) Television System - Advantage - Disadvantage Xv) Accelerometers - Advantage - Disadvantage Xvi) Electrogoniometers - Advantage - Disadvantage - Interpretation Of Test Results - Kinematic Written Reports 159
  • 160. UNIT - IV 4: Kinetics (Set – I) Physical Properties Of Limbs And Total Body - Definitions And Standard Units - Limitations - Purpose For Measuring - Relevance - Relationship Between Physical Properties And Movement Parameters - Testing Procedure - Center Of Gravity (Or Mass) And Center Of Volume - Mass Moments Of Inertia - Interpretation Of Test Results UNIT V 5. Kinetics (Set – Ii) Forces, Impulse, and Momentum i) Definitions And Standard Units ii) Limitations iii) Purpose For Measuring iv) Relevance v) Measurement Techniques And Tests vi) Ground Reaction Forces And Pressure Distribution vii) Impulses And Momentum viii) Interpretation Of Test Results PRACTICALS i) Measurement And / Or Analysis of Any Two Physical Properties. ii) Measurement And / Or Analysis of Any Two Kinematic Variables. iii) Measurement And / Or Analysis of Any Two Kinetic Variables. iv) Prepare A Kinematic Teaching Lesson Plan. v) Prepare A Kinetic Teaching Lesson Plan. REFERENCES1. Gowitzke, B.A. and Milner, M. (1988). Scientific Bases of Human Movement. (3rd. ed.) Baltimore: Williams and Wilkins.2. Grimshaw, Paul., Lees, Adrian., Flower, Neil.,&Burden, Adrian. Sports and Exercise Biomechanics.Taylor & Francis.3. Groves, R and Camaine, D. (1983). Concepts in Kinesiology. (2nd. ed.). Philadelphia: Saunders College Publishing.4. Hall, Susan J. Basic Biomechanics. Mosby Year Book5. Hay, J. (1978). The biomechanics of sport techniques. (2nd. ed.). Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall.6. Hay, J. & Reid, J. (1982). The Anatomical and Mechanical Bases of Human Motion. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall.7. Luttegens, Kathryn., Deutsch, Helga., Hamilton, Nancy. Kinesiology-Scientific Basis of Human Motion. 8th ed, Brown & Bench mark.8. Nordin, M. & Frankel, V. (1990). Basic Biomechanics of the Musculoskeletal System, Philadelphia: Lea & Febiger.9. Northrip, J., Logan, G. & McKinney, W. (1983). Analysis of Sport Motion. (3rd. ed). Dubuque: William C. Brown.10. Rasch, P. (1989). Kinesiology and Applied Anatomy. Philadelphia: Lea & Febiger.11. Thompson, C. (1985). Manual of Structural Kinesiology. (10th ed.). St. Louis: Times Mirror/ Mosby College Publishing. 160
  • 161. PAPER NO. – IV (iii) Module-III SUBJECT SPECIALIZATION – EXERCISE AND SPORT PSYCHOLOGYUNIT-I PSYCHOLOGICAL MEASUREMENT IN EXERCISE & SPORT 1.1 Concept of psychometry 1.2 Sport & exercise related psychological variables 1.3 Trait versus state measures 1.4 General versus sport-specific measures 1.5 Precautions in using psychological tests 1.6 Qualitative versus quantitative measuresUNIT-II CONSTRUCTION AND STANDARDIZATIN OF A PSYCHOLOGICAL TEST 2.1 Standardized versus tailored tests 2.2 Identifying variables & factors to be included in the test 2.3 Developing question- statement 2.4 Seeking expert opinion 2.5 Finalizing test format 2.6 Application of test standardization criteria Validity Reliability Objectivity Practicability Revision of the draft test Development of norms UNIT-III PROCEDURE FOR ADMINISTRATION OF TEST & INTERPRETATION 3.1 Procedure for administration 3.2 Any seven of the following tests to be administered and the data processed and interpreted of test Personality –Eysenck personality questionnaire and thematic application test Anxiety – SCAT Motivation Athletics problems Mental toughness I.Q, E Q & SQ Attention Aggregation Psychological skill Incentive motivation Self - confidence Self - efficacy Technique of group cohesion, sociometr Self-esteem test- (Rosenberg)UNIT-IV FIELD WORK 4.1 Preparing a psychological skills profile of at least 10 players 4.2 Identifying athlete’s problems and developing strategies to deal with them 4.3 Preparing psychological profiles using any standardized testsUNIT-V UNDERSTANDING PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTING EQUIPEMENTS 5.1 Reaction time apparatus 5.2 Depth perception, dexterity apparatus 5.3 Peripheral vision apparatus 5.4 Anticipation apparatus 5.5 Eye hand & eye beg coordination apparatus 5.6 Overcoming difficulties in using psychological testing apparatus REFERENCESPsychology 1. Aggarwal, J.C., Basic Ideas in Educational Psychology, Delhi: Sipra, 2003. 2. Bhatia, Hans Raj, Test Book of Educational Psychology, Delhi: Macmillan, 2003. 3. Cashmore, Ellis, Key Concepts in Sport Psychology, London, Routledge, 2004. 4. Cox, R. H., Sport Psychology Ed 5 Th., London, Mcgraw Hill, 2002. 161
  • 162. PAPER NO. – IV (iii) Module-III SUBJECT SPECIALIZATION - PROFESSIONAL PREPARATION AND CURRICULUM DESIGNPROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENTUNIT-1 SELF-PREPARATION FOR CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 1.1 Self-assessment, scanning and listing new/first job 1.2 Preparing for job application 1.3 Developing a resume 1.4 Facing Interview and follow-upUNIT-2 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 2.1 Meaning and aim of professional development; need and type for in-service training 2.2 Constrains and compulsions in physical education during in-service training 2.3 Role of training institutes and resource persons in professional enrichment 2.4 Professional literature/materialUNIT-3 INNOVATIVE APPROACHES TO PROFESSIONAL LEADERSHIP AND IDEAS IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 3.1 Volunteer’s role 3.1 Qualities of volunteer leaders 3.2 Developing leadership competencies, 3.3 Community sports leadership programsUNIT-4 FOUNDATIONS OF CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT 4.1 Definition, meaning, approach to curriculum designing 4.2 Steps and Factors effecting curriculum development 4.3 Resource material for Physical education curriculum 4.4 Content, subject matter, its scope and limitsUNIT-5 PRINCIPLES OF CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT 5.1 Principles of curriculum development 5.2 Overview of developed curriculumPRACTICALS: 1. Developing a professional resume/portfolio, group discussions 2. Mock – interviews and discussions for job placements REFERENCES 1. Adams William C. Foundation of Physical Education Exercise and Sports Sciences, Philadelphia, 1991. 2. Gupta Rakesh, Sharma Akhilesh, and Sharma Santosh, Professional Preparation and Curriculum Design in Physical Education & sports Sciences, New Delhi, Friends Publications, 2004 3. Hoover. Kenneth H., The Professional Teacher’s Handbook, Boston, Allyn and Bacoon, 1972 4. Krik David, Physical Education and Curriculum Study, Kent, Croom Helm, 1988 5. Sandhu Kiran, Professional Preparation and Career Development in Physical Education, New Delhi, Friends Publications, 2004 6. Sandhu Kiran, Trends and Development in Professional Preparation in Physical Education, New Delhi, Friends Publication, 2006 7. Wessel Janet A, and Kelly Luke, Achievement-Based Curriculum Development in Physical Education, Philadepia, Lea and Febiger, 1986 8. Zeigler E.F, Professional and Scholarly Foundation of Physical Education and Kinesiology, Sports Educational Technologies, 2007 162
  • 163. PAPER NO. – IV (iii) Module-III SUBJECT SPECIALIZATION –SPORT SOCIOLOGY UNIT-I SPORT AND SOCIALIZATION PROCESS 1.1 Theories of socialization and sport 1.2 Socialization and gender 1.3 New approaches in sport socialization 1.4 Psycho-social implications and impact of organized youth sport 1.5 Recent trends in youth sport 1.6 Desocialization and sportUNIT-II SPORT AND SOCIALIZATION THROUGH FAMILY AND EDUCATION SYSTEM 2.1 Sport socialization through educational and family systems 2.2 Desocialization of sport and school interaction 2.3 Competitive sport and socialization prospective 2.4 Women and sport – history, technology and social issuesUNIT-III SPORT AND GENDER 3.1 Definition and theories of gender 3.2 Women & sport history, ideology and structural issues 3.3 Gender disparity discrimination and equity 3.4 Stereotype and gender (masculinity and feminity) in sportUNIT-IV SPORT AND PROBLEMS IN SPORTS 4.1 Concept and meaning of deviance 4.2 Sports problem at school and college (academic performance, academic abuses; use, mis-use, and abuse of sports) 4.3 Post retirement psychological problems of athletesUNIT-V SPORT AND SPECTATORS 5.1 Sport spectators history Spectators and sport Influence of spectators on dynamics of sports 5.2 Paradox between Olympic movement and emerging priorities in sportsPRACTICAL AND ASSIGNMENT1 Social maturity scale, parent - child relationship scale2 Prepare a paper on a topic of your choice with at least 15 references3 Evaluate and compare the process of socialization taken place in schools of India and abroad.4 Make an observation of spectators involved in National school & into university competition in different games REFERENCESSociology 1. Bhusan, V. and Sachdeva, An Introduction to Sociology, Delhi: Kitab, 2003. 2. IGNOU, The Study of Society - Understanding Sociology, Delhi - IGNOU, 2007. 3. Inkeles, A. Ed., What Is Sociology, ND: Prentice Hall, 1997. 4. Jain, Rachna, Sports Sociology, New Delhi: KSK, 2005. 5. Kanwal Jeet, S., Sport Sociology, ND: Friends Pub., 2000. 6. Mitchell, G.D. Ed., Dictionary of Sociology, U.K : Routledge, 1999. 7. Sharma, R. N, Urban Sociology, ND: Surjeet Pub., 1993. 8. Singh, Bhupinder, Sports Sociology, New Delhi: Friends, 2004. 9. Turner, B., Cambridge Dictionary of Sociology, U.K., Cambridge, U.N. Press., 2006 163
  • 164. PAPER NO. – IV (iii) Module-III SUBJECT SPECIALIZATION-SPORT MANAGEMENTFINANCE AND MARKETING MANAGEMENTUNIT-I INTRODUCTION 1.1 Meaning and concept of finance management 1.2 Financial resources 1.3 Concept of marketing in sports industries 1.4 Sports as growing economy and sports marketingUNIT-II BUDGETING 2.1 Meaning, concept and need of budget 2.2 Preparation of budget 2.3 Principles of budgeting 2.4 Types of budgetsUNIT-III PURCHASE AND INVENTORY MAINTENANCE 3.1 Purchase procedure 3.2 Stock maintenance 3.3 Condemnation procedure 3.4 Accounting procedureUNIT-V PRODUCTION 4.1 Concept and type of production 4.2 Marketing surveys and analysis 4.3 Pricing strategies of product 4.4 Advertising and promotional strategiesUNIT V LEGAL IMPLICATIONS 5.1 Firm/ organization registration procedure 5.2 Import and export procedure 5.3 Franchise procedure 5.4 Guarantee, warrantee, after care services and compensation REFERENCES Sport Management 1. Allen, L.A. Management & Organization. Kogakusha Co. Tokyo, 1988. 2. Chakraborty, S. Sports Management Delhi, Sports Publications, 1998. 3. Kamlesh, M. L. Management Concept in Physical Education and Sport, New Delhi Metropolitan Book Co. Pvt. Ltd, 2000. 4. Roy, S.S. Sports Management Delhi, Friends Publications, 1995. 5. Sivia, G.S. Sports Management in Universities, New Delhi: A.I.U. Deen Dayal Upadhyaya Marg, 1991. 6. Sandhu, K. Sports Dynamics: Psychology, Sociology and Management 164
  • 165. SEMESTER-IVS. Paper Module Title of the PaperNo. No.1. VIII Optional Group-II (One to be selected from the list) 1. Adapted Physical Education 2. Fitness and Wellness 3. Sport Therapy 4. Sport Journalism 5. Sport Industry & Marketing 6. Sport, Physical Activity & Nutrition2. IX Dissertation / Project Work / Long Essay3. X Measurement and Evaluation in Physical Education4. IV (iv) IV Subject Specialization (One to be selected from the list) 1. Exercise Physiology 2. Sports Biomechanics 3. Exercise & Sport Psychology 4. Professional Preparation & Curriculum Design 5. Sport Sociology 6. Sport Management 165
  • 166. PAPER NO. – VIII (a) OPTIONAL GROUP-II ADAPTED PHYSICAL EDUCATIONUNIT-I INTRODUCTION TO A DAPTED PHYSICAL EDUCATION 1.1 Meaning and definitions 1.2 Aims and objectives 1.3 Need and importance 1.4 Role of physical education in adapted physical education 1.5 Brief historical review of adapted physical educationUNIT-II CLASSIFICATION OF DISABILITY 2.1 Changing concept of disability handicaps, retardation, physically and mentally challenged 2.2 Physical disability 2.2.1 Characteristics 2.2.2 Category 2.2.3 Functional limitation 2.2.4 General causes 2.3 Mental retardation and learning disability 2.3.1 Characteristics 2.3.2 Category 2.3.3 Functional limitation 2.3.4 General causes 2.4 Hearing and speech impairment 2.4.1 Characteristics 2.4.2 Category 2.4.3 Functional limitation 2.4.4 General causes 2.5 Visual impairment 2.5.1 Characteristics 2.5.2 Category 2.5.3 Functional limitation 2.5.4 General causes 2.6 Other disabled conditions 2.6.1 Behavioural problems associated with disability Adjustment problem Emotional problem Personality problem 2.6.2 Social problems Social stigma Discrimination Social rejectionUNIT-III ADAPTED PHYSICAL EDUCATION PROGRAMMES 3.1 Guiding principles for adapted physical education programme (AAHPER Principle) 3.2 Physical education programme for disabled of : 3.2.1 Elementary school 3.2.2 Middle school 3.2.3 High school 3.3 Special adapted programme for various types and categories of physical disability 3.3.1 Regular physical activity 3.3.2 Informal games and special activity 3.3.3 Informal and formal competitions 3.4 Special adapted programme for hearing and speech impairment, visual impairment, mental retardation and learning impairment 3.4.1 Regular physical activity 3.4.2 Informal games and special activity 3.4.3 Informal and formal competitions 166
  • 167. UNIT-IV ACTIVITIES FOR DISABLED 4.1 Co-curricular activities for disabled 4.1.1 Outdoor programmes for disabled 4.1.2 Adventure based outdoor programme 4.1.3 Creative development and hobby & culture development programme 4.2 Aquatic activity programme for disabled 4.2.1 Importance of activity for disabled 4.2.2 Nature of aquatic activity programme based on types of various disability 4.2.3 Rehabilitative role and importance of aquatic activityUNIT-V REHABILITATION AND GOVERNMENTAL WELFARE PROGRAMMES 5.1 Rehabilitation 5.1.1 Aims and objectives of rehabilitation 5.1.2 Meaning of functional and occupational rehabilitation 5.1.3 Importance of adapted programme in rehabilitation Functional rehabilitation Psychological rehabilitation – adjustmental, environmental and personality development 5.2 Governmental Welfare Programme 5.2.1 Provisions of special rights and privilege for disabled through legislations 5.2.2 Social welfare programmes for disabled 5.2.3 Mass public education/awareness programme Education approach Service approach 5.2.4 Legislative approach REFERENCES 1. Anoop Jain, “Adapted Physical Education” Sports Publication, Ashok Vihar, Delhi. 2. Arthur G. Miller & James, “Teaching Physical Activities to Impaired Youth” John Wilag & Sons Inc. Canada. 3. Arthur S. Daniels & Euilya, “Adapted Physical Education” Harpet & Row Publisher, New York. 4. Auxter, Byler, Howtting, “Adapted Physical Education and Reactions” Morbey – St. Louis Mirrauri. 5. K. Park, “Preventive Social Medicine” M/s Banarsidas Bhanot Publishers, Prem Nagar, Jabalpur. 6. Ronald W. French & Paul J., “Special Physical Education” Charles E. Merrics Publishing Co. Edinburgh, Ohio. 167
  • 168. PAPER NO. – VIII (b) OPTIONAL GROUP-II FITNESS & WELLNESSUNIT – I INTRODUCTION 1.1 Concept and meaning of fitness and wellness 1.2 Components of fitness and their description 1.3 Components of wellness and their description 1.4 Significance of fitness and wellness in present scenario. 1.5 Fitness and wellness for lifeUNIT – II FITNESS PROFILE, DEVELOPMENT AND MAINTAINENCE OF FOLLOWING 2.1 Types :- physical ( cardio respiratory, strength, speed agility, flexibility, power, muscular endurance) health related (cardio-respiratory, flexibility, body composition, muscular strength and endurance) motor skill related (speed, power, agility, coordination, endurance, balance) 2.2 Principals of physical fitness 2.3 Benefits of fitness programme 2.4 Obesity (causes and prevention) 2.5 Weight management (role of diet & exercise in maintenance of ideal weight)UNIT – III WELLNESS 3.1 Identifying dimensions of wellness, achieving and maintenance of wellness Adopting healthy & positive lifestyle. Identifying stressors and managing stress Staying safe & preventing injuries Knowledge of Nutrition & its implication on healthy lifestyle Factors leading to eating disorders Hazards of substance abuse (smoking, alcohol & tobacco) Adoption of spirituality principals & their remedial measures Yogic practices for achieving health and fitness Worthwhile use of leisure time. Sexuality – preventive measures for sexual transmitted diseases. Emphasis on proper rest &sleep. Prevention of cancer, cardio-vascular disorders &other diseases. 3.2 Relationship of wellness towards positive lifestyle 3.3 Benefits of wellnessUNIT – IV BEHAVIOR MODIFICATION 4.1 Barriers to change 4.2 Process of change (6 stages) SMART 4.3 Technique of change & smart goal setting. 4.4 Healthy lifestyle approach. (Introduction, prevention, and treatment of inactivity diseases)UNIT – V DAILY SCHEDULE OF ACHIEVING QUALITY OF LIFE & WELLNESS 5.1 Daily schedule based upon one’s attitude, gender, age &occupation. 5.2 Basic – module: - Time split for rest, sleep, diet, activity & recreation. 5.3 Principles to achieve quality of life:- positive attitude, daily regular exercise, control over food habits & healthy hygienic practices.PRACTICAL 1. FITNESS LABS: Various labs testing related to cardio-vascular endurance, flexibility, muscular strength and body composition. 2. PHYSIOLOGICAL TESTING: - Blood pressure, VO2 max, vital capacity, pulse rate. 3. STRESS MANAGEMENT :- Yogic practices (asanas, pranayam and meditation) 4. SURVEY PROJECT: - Fitness & wellness assessment of local community. 5. NUTRITIONAL DIET ANALYSIS :- Given diet 168
  • 169. REFERENCESFitness 1. Anderson, B., Stretch Yourself for Health & Fitness, Delhi : UBSPD, 2002. 2. Austin and Noble, Swimming For Fitness, Madras: All India Pub., 1997. 3. Bean, Anita, Food For Fitness, London : A & C Block, 1999. 4. Callno Flood, D.K., Practical Math For Health Fitness, New Delhi, 1996. 5. Cox, Corbin, C.B & Indsey, R., Concepts of Physical Fitness, WC Brown, 1994. 6. Difiore, Judy, Complete Guide to Postnatal Fitness, London : A & C Black, 1998. 7. Giam, C.K & The, K.C., Sport Medicine Exercise and Fitness, Singapore : P.G. Medical Book, 1994. 8. Gosselior, C., The Ultimate Guide to Fitness, London: Vermilion, 1995. 9. Harrison, J.C., Hooked on Fitness, NY: Parker Pub. Com., 1993. 10. Hoeger, W.K. and S.A., Principles and Labs for Physical Fitness, Englewood Morton, 1999. 11. Kirtani, Reema, Physical Fitness, Delhi : Khel Sahitya, 1998. 12. Maud, J.R. and Foster, C., Physiology Assessment of Human Fitness, New Delhi, 1995. 13. Mcglynn, G., Dynamics of Fitness, Madison : W.C.B Brown, 1993. 14. Muller, J. P., Health, Exercise and Fitness Delhi : Sports, 2000. 15. Muller, J.P., Health Exercise and Fitness, Delhi: Sports, 2003. 16. Saggar, S.K., Physical Fitness, New Delhi : Rupa Co., 1994. 17. Sharkey, B.J., Physiology of Fitness, Human Kinetics Book, 1990. 18. Thani, Lokesh, Rules of Games and Games and Fitness, Delhi: Sports, 2003. 169
  • 170. PAPER NO. – VIII (c) OPTIONAL GROUP-II SPORT THERAPYUNIT-I INTRODUCTION 1.1 Meaning, concept and importance of sports therapy 1.2 Trends, ethics and legalities in sports therapyUNIT-II 2.1 Qualities & qualification of sports therapist 2.2 Role of sports therapist in competitive sportsUNIT-III 3.1 Basic and functional anatomy 3.2 Basic pathologyUNIT-IV 4.1 Sports injuries – causes, classification and complications 4.2 Common treatment methods Massage Bandaging Strapping Exercise etcUNIT-V 5.1 Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation: Therapeutic modalities 5.2 Assessment, priority, planning and management of injuries REFERENCESPhysiotherapyPorter, S.B., Physiotherapy ed. 13th, Oxford, Butterworth, 2006.Sports Medicine 1. Davies, J.E., Essentials of Sports Medicine, New Delhi, 1986. 2. Ellison, A.E. and others, Athletic Training & Sports Medicine, American Academy, 1984. 3. Eriksson, B.O.[et.al.], Sports Medicine, Great Britain: Guiness Pub., 1990. 4. Irvin, R. and others, Sports Medicine, USA : Allyn and Bacon, 1998. 5. Jain, Rachna, Sports Medicine, New Delhi: KSK, 2002. 6. Khanna, G.L & Jayprakash, C.S., Exercise Physiology & Sports Medicine, Lucky, 1990. 7. Khanna, G.L., Exercise Physiology & Sports Medicine, Lucky Enterprises, 1990. 8. Komi, P.V., Encyclopaedia of Sports Medicine, Blackwell, 1992. 9. Pande, P.K., Sports Medicine, ND; Khel Sahitya Kendra, 1998. 10. Pandey, P.K., Outline of Sports Medicine, Delhi: J.P. Brothers, 1987. 11. Prentice, W.E., Therapeutic Modalities in Sports Medicine, Times Mirror, 1990. 12. Renstrom, Encyclopaedia of Sports Medicine, Blackwell, 1993. 13. Roy and Irvin, Sports Medicine, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, 1983. 14. Shephard and Astrand, Encyclopaedia of Sports Medicine, Blackwell, 1992. 15. Shephard, R.J. & Astrand, P.O., Encyclpedia of Sports Medicine, Blackwell, Sc. Pub., 1992. 16. Shephard, R.J., Yearbook of Sports Medicine, Mosby Yearbook, 1990. 17. Torg, J.S. and others, Current Therapy in Sports Medicine, New Delhi, 1996. 18. Vijay Ed., Handbook of Sports Medicine, Delhi : Friends Pub, 2001. 170
  • 171. PAPER NO. – VIII (d) OPTIONAL GROUP-II SPORT JOURNALISMUNIT-I INTRODUCTION 1.1 Meaning, scope and changing trends of journalism in sports 1.2 Role of journalism in sports promotion & vice - versa 1.3 Historical development & role of print and electronic media in sports promotion 1.4 Media, ethics and responsibilities of journalist & editor (social, legal and professional) UNIT-II WRITING SKILLS FOR MEDIA 2.1 Language – vocabulary, spellings, figure of speech , dialect, grammar, punctuation 2.2 Sports terminators and its use 2.3 Fundamentals of a sports story/ news 2.4 News – types, curtain – raiser, advance follow – up, news – analysis, box news 2.4 Design & make – ups: headings, front reading, layout & page making late stories, editorial tools, marks & skillsUNIT-III ORGANIZATIONAL AND PRESENTATION SKILLS FOR MEDIA 3.1 Organizational set-up of a news paper- printing, process sequences of operations in the printing of a news paper/journals. 3.2 Introduction of various sports organization and agencies- Olympic Games, Asian games, commonwealth games, awards and trophies. 3.3 Write-ups: feature, follow-ups, advance story, curtain raiser, flash back, articles, filters, editorials, boxes, radio and T.V. commentary anchoring, interviews, group discussions, talk – shows, and reviews in sports 3.4 Development and maintenance of sports / personal library 3.5 Statistics, records and computers in sportsUNIT-IV EXTENDED RELEVANT DIMENSIONS 4.1 Theory and principles of advertising in sports 4.2 Public relations in sports, press release, conferences 4.3 Public Relation Media – advertising, press release, conferences, exhibitions, fairs, street drama, public speaking, radio, televisions, newspapers, films, posters, pictures, and graphics 4.4 Sports photo feature and writing captions of photos 4.5 Introduction to photo journalism in reference to sports UNIT-V RESEARCH TRENDS AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS IN SPORTS JOURNALISM 5.1 Process of news paper publishing and management 5.2 Olympics and sports journalism 5.3 Research tools for developing a sports story 5.4 Introduction to various types of information technology 5.6 Satellite communication: use of satellite in radio and T.V. communication for sports information REFERENCESJournalism 1. Ahuja, B.N., Theory and Practice of Journalism, Delhi : Surjeet, 1988. 2. Aster, J.J., Art of Modern Journalism, Focal Press, 1988. 3. Bromley, M., Journalism, Hodder to ughton, 1994. 4. Kamath, M.V., Professional Journalism, New Delhi, 1980. 5. Parthasarathy, Ranga Swami, Basic Journalism, Macmillan, 1984. 171
  • 172. PAPER NO. – VIII (e) OPTIONAL GROUP-II SPORT INDUSTRY AND MARKETINGUNIT-I INTRODUCTION OF SPORTS INDUSTRY AND MARKETING 1.1 Evolution, growth and scope of sports industry and sports marketing 1.2 Structure of sports industry 1.3 Framework of sports marketing 1.4 basic marketing principlesUNIT-II ECONOMICS OF SPORTS INDUSTRY 2.1 Definition, meaning and scope of economics in sports 2.2 Theory of demand and supply in sports industry 2.3 Fiscal problems in sports management 2.4 Major components of sports industryUNIT-III RESEARCH PROCESSES IN SPORTS MARKETING 3.1 Selection of problem or opportunity 3.2 Research tools for selecting potential market 3.3 Research design type and data collection techniques 3.4 Data analysis and final report.UNIT-IV PRODUCTION AND MARKETING 4.1 Concept of sports product; new product; life cycle of product 4.2 Pricing concepts and strategies 4.3 distribution concepts and sponsorship programmmes 4.4 Promotion planning; advertising and personal sellingUNIT-V LEGAL IMPLICATIONS 5.1 Constitution and registration of firms 5.2 Consumer rights – guarantee, warrantee, after-sales service and insurance 5.3 Patent, royalty and approval. 5.4 Laws pertaining to sports industry and marketing REFERENCES Sport Management 1. Allen, L.A. Management & Organization. Kogakusha Co. Tokyo, 1988. 2. Hert, Renis, New Patterns of Management, McGraw Hill, 1961. 3. Sivia, G.S. Sports Management in Universities, New Delhi: A.I.U. Deen Dayal Upadhyaya Marg, 1991. 4. Sandhu, K. Sports Dynamics: Psychology, Sociology and Management 172
  • 173. PAPER NO. – VIII (f) OPTIONAL GROUP-II SPORTS, PHYSICAL ACTIVITY & NUTRITIONUNIT-I SPORT 1.1 Meaning and concept 1.2 Sport for children 1.3 Sport for adults 1.4 Sport for old people 1.5 Sport for womenUNIT-II PHYSICAL ACTIVITY 2.1 Meaning, definition and concepts 2.2 Benefits of physical activity at different growth stages 2.3 Classification/types of physical activity 2.4 Active (healthy) life style 2.5 Steps in exercise prescriptionUNIT-III BENEFITS OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY IN PREVENTION & CURE OF DISEASES 3.1 Hypokinetic disease and sedentary life style 3.2 Benefits of Physical activity in hypertension 3.3 Benefits of physical activity in diabetes 3.4 Benefits of physical activity in coronary artery diseases 3.5 Benefits of physical activity in obesityUNIT-IV NUTRITION 4.1 Definition, meaning and importance 4.2 Components of good nutrition & healthy eating habit 4.3 Junk food and fast food, vegetarian/non vegetarian diet 4.4 Sports nutrition and food hygiene 4.5 Caloric value of different foodsUNIT-V WEIGHT MANAGEMENT 5.1 Definition and meaning of normal weight 5.2 Definition and meaning causes of under - weight and over – weight and their draw backs 5.3 Role of exercise in weight management 5.4 Role of physical activity weight – management 5.5 Weight - management - other methodsPRACTICALS 1. Exercise Prescription for the following age groups i. Under 5 years ii. 5-10 years iii. Preadolescent iv. Adult v. Old age 2. Exercise prescription for females 3. Diet prescription for various age groups 4. Diet prescription for various disease groups 5. Calorie consumption in various activities 173
  • 174. REFERENCESNutrition 1. Driskell, J.A, Sport Nutrition, New York : Crc Press, 2000. 2. Eberle, S.G., Endurance Sports Nutrition ed 2nd, U.S. Human Kinetics, 2007. 3. Edu. Planning Group Delhi, Food and Nutrition, ND: Arya Pub. House, 1989. 4. Guidelines for Training Community Health Workers in Nutrition, World Health Organization, 1986. 5. Gupta, K. etc., Food and Nutrition ed 5th., N.D. J.P. Broth., 2000. 6. Gupta, K., Food and Nutrition, ND: Jaypee, 1992. 7. Gupta, Kusum, Food and Nutrition, Jay. Brothers, 1986. 8. Hegarty, V., Decisions in Nutrition, Louis: Times Mirror, 1988. 9. Katch, F.L., Sport, Health and Nutrition, Human Kinetics, 1986. 10. Morrissey, B.G., Therapeutic Nutrition, I.B. Lippincott Co. : London, 1984. 11. Null, Gray, The Complete Guide to Health & Nutrition, Trlington Books, 1984. 12. Reddy, R.S., Teaching Health and Nutrition, ND : Commin Pub., 1997. 13. Reema, B.H., Fitness, Health and Nutrition, New Delhi: K.S.K., 2003. 14. Suitor, C.J & Crowley, Nutrition, London : J.B. Co., 1984. 15. Vuaya Kakshmi, Sports Nutrition, New Delhi Friends, 2007. 16. W.H.O, Guideline in Nutrition, Geneva : WHO, 1986. 17. Wardlaw, G. [et.al.], Contemporary Nutrition, London: Mosby, 1994. 174
  • 175. PAPER NO. – IX DISSERTATION/PROJECT WORK/LONG ESSAY 175
  • 176. PAPER NO. – X MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION IN PHYSICAL EDUCATIONUNIT - I INTRODUCTION 1.1 Concept of test, measurement, evaluation and selection (sports selection) 1.2 Inter-relationship between test, measurement and evaluation. 1.3 Principle, need & importance 1.4 Scope of test, measurement and evaluation.UNIT - II TEST 2.1 Classification Physical / psychomotor aptitude Standardized/ teacher made (objective/ subjective) 2.2 Construction Criteria for test selection (reliability, validity, objectivity, feasibility and precision) Norms and standards (differentiating and setting) 2.3 Administration Administrative protocols (administrative guidelines) Preparation of reports (construction of tables, groups & reporting)UNIT – III MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUE : (Understanding concepts of) 3.1 PHYSICAL : Measurement of size, shape, and body composition 3.2 PSYCHOMOTOR : Fitness ( physical performance) Physiological (pulse rate, blood pressure, vital capacity, VO2 max. Motor fitness (power, agility, balance, speed, reaction time, co- ordination) Motor ability Sports skill (basketball, volleyball, hockey, football and badminton) 3.3 APTITUDE :Individuals attitude , ability, behavior and educabilityUNIT - IV EVALUATION 4.1 BASIC MODEL. 4.2 TYPES Subjective & objective evaluation Internal & external evaluation Summative and formative evaluation Norm based and criteria basedUNIT V SPORTS TALENT AND TEAM SELECTION 5.1 Concept of talent selection and counseling. 5.2 Basis of talent selection general fitness (test batteries *) specific fitness ( related to particular sports) sports skills • Basketball • Volleyball • Hockey • Football • Badminton* AAPHER, INDIANA, JCR, BARROW 176
  • 177. PRACTICALS 1. Anthropometric measurement 2. Somatotyping, somatocharts & indices 3. Practical measurement of Pulse rate Blood pressure Vital capacity Vo2 max 4. Skill test Basketball (Johnson basketball ability test) Volleyball (Braddy volleyball test and Russel & long volleyball test) Hockey (French hockey test, Friedal hockey test) Football (mc Donald soccer test Badminton (Lockhart & mc Phearson badminton skill, miller wall volley test) 5. CONSTRUCTION OF NEW TEST Skill test Knowledge test Psychomotor test (Joint venture of group- 5 students per group) REFERENCESMeasurement & Evaluation 1. Lacy, A.C. and Douglas N. Hastad, Mesurement & Evaluation in Physical Education and Exercise Science, 2003. 2. Cohen, R.J. and M.E. Swerdhik, Psychological Testing and Assessment : An Introduction to Tests and Measurement, 1999. 3. Kansal, D.K. Text Book of Test, Measurement, Evaluation and sports selection for All sports and spiritual sciences Publication, New Delhi, 2008. 4. Tritschler, K.a, Barrow & McGee’s, practical Measurement and assessment, 2000. 177
  • 178. PAPER NO. – IV (iv) Module-IV SUBJECT SPECIALIZATION - EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGYUNIT-1 ASSESSING ADULT FITNESS AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY 1.1 Measuring Health-Related Physical Activity (a) Measuring Aerobic Capacity: Laboratory methods- maximal exercise (VO2 max), Exercise testing submaximal (estimating Vo2 max) Field methods- distance runs, step tests, Rockport 1-mile walk test Prediction of Vo2 max with equations Vo2 max (b) Measuring muscular strength and endurance Lab methods- computerized dynamometers Field methods- upper and lower body strength and endurance o Bench press, Canadian standardized test. o Test of fitness- push ups, YMCA 1 minute o Timed sit-up test 1.2 Testing for older population • Assessment of lower body strength • Upper body strength • Aerobic endurance • Alternate test to assess aerobic endurance • Flexibility of different joints. • Physical mobilityUNIT-2 ASSESSMENT OF FITNESS IN PHYSICALLY CHALLENGED SUBJECTS (ADAPTED PHYSICAL EDUCATION) 2.1 Exercise and Fitness for physically challenged subjects. • Categories of physically challenged subjects. • Exercise and fitness review in physically challenged subjects. 2.2 Fitness Assessment in Disabled • Anaerobic capacity and power • Aerobic capacity • Electrocardio graphic response to exercise • Muscular strength/endurance • Flexibility • Body composition • Appropriate fitness assessment: disability conditions, protocol selection specificity.UNIT-3 PHYSIOLOGICAL TESTS FOR ELITE ATHLETES IN LAB & FIELD. 3.1 General Assessment Procedures: • Anthropometric assessment protocols • Measuring flexibility for performance and injury prevention. • Determination of maximal oxygen consumption. • Blood lactate response to exercise • ECG placement and monitor operations 3. 2 Protocols for Physiological Assessment of Players of Specific Sports • Lab and field environment and subject preparation • Equipment checklist • Protocols • Test administration • Data recording forms 178
  • 179. UNIT-4 CALCULATIONS OF CARDIOVASCULAR DYNAMICS AND METABOLIC EQUIVALENT 4.1 Major Concepts in Calculations of Cardiovascular Dynamics • The fick equation: determining cardiac out put • Absolute and relative Vo2 • a - Vo2 diff • Double product • Mean arterial pressure 4.2 Basel Energy Expenditure: • Measuring energy expenditure at basal condition. • Converting METS to Kcal • Determining appropriate exercise intensity • Karronen formula.UNIT-5 CALCULATING ENERGY COST OF ACTIVITY 5.1 Energy Cost • Energy Cost of Level Walking • Energy cost of uphill walking. • Energy cost of running 5.2 Energy cost for submaximal exercise testing and related math • Stepping • Cycling. • SwimmingPRACTICAL: 1. Anthropometric assessments 2. blood lactate response to exercise :assessment 3. ECG placement and monitor operations 4. Physiological assessment of players of various sports. 5. measuring aerobic capacity (lab/field) 6. Measuring muscular strength/endurance. (lab/field) 7. Measurement of energy cost of walking, running, cycling & jogging. REFERENCES 1. Acevedo, Edmund O, Starks, Michael, A. Exercise Testing and Prescription Manual. Human Kinetics 2003. 2. Gore, Christopher John. Physiological Tests for Elite Athlete. Australian Sports Lommission. Human Kinetics.2000. 3. Morrow, James R. Jackson, Allen W, Disch, James G., Mood, Dale P. Measurement and Evaluation in Human performance. 2nded. Human kinetics 2000. 179
  • 180. PAPER NO. – IV (iv) Module-IV SUBJECT SPECIALIZATION -SPORTBIOMECHANICS UNIT - I 1. Kinetics (Set- Iii) Mechanical Energy, Work, and Efficiency i) Definitions And Standard Units ii) Limitations iii) Purpose For Measuring iv) Potential Uses For Measurement Of Movement Patterns v) Relevance vi) Work-Energy Applications To Sport vii) Testing Procedures viii) The Problem Of The Concept And Calculation Of Mechanical Efficiency of Athletic Performance ix) Interpretation Of Test Results 2: Neuromuscular Considerations Definition and Explanation of the Parameter i) Reaction Time ii) Fiber Type - Purpose For Measuring The Different Neuromuscular Parameters and Their Relevance - Testing Procedure - Interpretation Of Results UNIT - II 3: Recommended Procedures (Set- I) Cinematography and Computerized Video Analysis i) 2-D Cinematography And Computerized Video Analysis ii) 3-D Cinematography (Equipment Specifications, Calibration And Expected Reliability, Other Considerations) iii) Single – Plate Techniques (Equipment Specifications, Calibration Procedures And Expected Reliability, Other Consideration) iv) Optoelectric Movement Monitoring System (Equipment Specifications, Calibration Procedures And Expected Reliability) v) Television Systems (Calibration Procedures And Expected Reliability) Sampling Rate and Data Smoothing i) Sampling Rate ii) Data Smoothing 4: Recommended Procedures (Set- Ii) Direct Measurement Techniques i) Acclerometry (Equipment Specifications, Calibration Procedures And Expected Reliability) ii) Eletrogoniometery And Potentiometry (Equipment Specifications, Calibration Procedures and Expected Reliability, Other Consideration) Physical Properties of the Limbs and the Total Body Muscular Forces and Moments and Joint Reaction Forces - Calibration Procedures Expected Reliability UNIT III 5. Recommended Procedures (Set- Iii) Force and Procedure Transducers i) Transducers (Equipment Specifications, Calibration Procedures And Expected Reliability Of Static Performance, Dynamic Performance Characteristics, Other Consideration) ii) Force Platforms (Design, Basic Consideration In Design And Utilization, Calibration Procedures And Expected Reliability) iii) Pressure Platforms (Calibration Procedures And Expected Reliability) 180
  • 181. 6. Impulses and Momentum i) Linear Impulses ii) Angular Impulses iii) Airborne Activities (Equipment Specifications, Calibration Procedures And Expected Reliability) iv) Body Segment And Total Body Energies And Mechanical Work Output (Equipment Specifications) v) Inter Segmental Power Analysis (Equipment Specifications, Calibration Procedures) UNIT - IV 7. Recommended Procedures (Set- Iii) Neuromuscular Measurement (Emg) - Units, Terms And Standards In Reporting Emg Research. 8. An Introduction to Iso-Kinetic Measurements and Its Application. UNIT – V 9. An Introduction to Measurement and Applications to Gait Analysis 10(A). Modern Trends and Development of Biomechanical Instrumentation and Measurements. 10(B). Policy Statement Regarding The Use Of Human Subjects And Informed Concent.PRACTICALS 1. Preparation of A Biomechanical Research Proposal. 2. A Project on Biomechanical Research or Measurements or Normative Reference on A Given Topic. REFERENCES 1. Gowitzke, B.A. and Milner, M. (1988). Scientific Bases of Human Movement. (3rd. ed.) Baltimore: Williams and Wilkins. 2. Grimshaw, Paul., Lees, Adrian., Flower, Neil.,&Burden, Adrian. Sports and Exercise Biomechanics.Taylor & Francis. 3. Groves, R and Camaine, D. (1983). Concepts in Kinesiology. (2nd. ed.). Philadelphia: Saunders College Publishing. 4. Hall, Susan J. Basic Biomechanics. Mosby Year Book 5. Hay, J. (1978). The biomechanics of sport techniques. (2nd. ed.). Englewood Cliffs: Prentice- Hall. 6. Hay, J. & Reid, J. (1982). The Anatomical and Mechanical Bases of Human Motion. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall. 7. Luttegens, Kathryn., Deutsch, Helga., Hamilton, Nancy. Kinesiology-Scientific 8. Basis of Human Motion. 8th ed, Brown & Bench mark. 9. Nordin, M. & Frankel, V. (1990). Basic Biomechanics of the Musculoskeletal System, Philadelphia: Lea & Febiger. 10. Northrip, J., Logan, G. & McKinney, W. (1983). Analysis of Sport Motion. (3rd. ed). Dubuque: William C. Brown. 11. Rasch, P. (1989). Kinesiology and Applied Anatomy. Philadelphia: Lea & Febiger. 12. Thompson, C. (1985). Manual of Structural Kinesiology. (10th ed.). St. Louis: Times Mirror/ Mosby College Publishing. 181
  • 182. PAPER NO. – IV (iv) Module-IV SUBJECT SPECIALIZATION – EXERCISE AND SPORT PSYCHOLOGYPSYCHOLOGICAL TECHNIQUES FOR PERFORMANCE - ENHANCEMENTUNIT-I PSYCHING-UP STRATEGIES 1.1 Concept of “psyching up” “psyching on” and “psyching down “ 1.2 Selected psyching strategies 1.3 Goal - setting, pep talk, bulletin board, fan support, self activation pre- competition 1.4 Work outUNIT-II COMPONENTS OF PSYCHOLOGICAL PREPARATION 2.1 Relaxation techniques 2.2 Activation technique 2.3 Short - term psychological training 2.4 Placebo effect 2.5 Psychological skill training 2.6 Meditation –yogic and ZenUNIT-III COGNITIVE TRAINING 3.1 Visualization 3.2 Imagery 3.3 Strategies to improve, and concentration attention (association. v/s distraction strategies)UNIT-IV IMPROVING LEVEL OF MOTIVATION 4.1 Sports attributions - interest and aptitude 4.2 Developing self confidence 4.3 Attitudinal trainingUNIT-V HANDLING STRESS ANXEITY & AROUSAL 5.1 Relationship among stress, an anxiety and arousal 5.2 Management of aggression, cognitive, affective stress management strategies 5.3 Stress inoculation training 5.4 Arousal control REFERENCESPsychology 1. Aggarwal, J.C., Basic Ideas in Educational Psychology, Delhi: Sipra, 2003. 2. Bhatia, Hans Raj, Test Book of Educational Psychology, Delhi: Macmillan, 2003. 3. Cashmore, Ellis, Key Concepts in Sport Psychology, London, Routledge, 2004. 4. Cox, R. H., Sport Psychology Ed 5 Th., London, Mcgraw Hill, 2002. 5. Dewey, John, Psychology, New Delhi: K.S.K., 2003. 6. Jain, D., Introduction to Psychology, New Delhi: K.S.K., 2003. 7. Jain, Piyush and Tomar, C.S., History, Foundation of Physical Education and Educational Psychology, New Delhi, Friends, 2006. 8. Kamlesh, M.L, Educational Sport Psychology, New Delhi, Friends Pub., 2006. 9. Kamlesh, M.L., Key Ideas in Sport Psychology, New Delhi, Friends Pub., 2007. Kutty, S.K., Foundations of Sports & Exercise Psychology, New Delhi: Sports, 2004. 10. Levinthal, Charles F., Introduction to Physiological Psychology, N.D. Prentice Hall, 2005. 11. Seashore, C.E., Elementary Experiments in Psychology, ND: Sports Pub., 2001. 12. Shaw, D., an Encyclopedia of Test and Measurement in Sports Exercise Psychology, New Delhi, 2001. 13. Woodworth, R.S., Basic Facts in Psychology, ND: Sports Pub., 2001. 182
  • 183. PAPER NO. – IV (iv) Module-IV SUBJECT SPECIALIZATION PROFESSIONAL PREPARATION & CURRICULUM DESIGNCURRICULUM DESIGNINGUNIT-I CURRICULUM DOMAINS 1.1 Various models of Curriculum 1.2 Psychosocial foundation of curriculum 1.3 Curriculum innovationsUNIT-II THEORY OF CURRICULUM IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 2.1 Theoretical perspective 2.2 Sources, conceptual framework, study models 2.3 Selection of curriculum experiencesUNIT-III PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT 3.1 Curriculum development • Active curriculum framework • Skill development concerns • Sex integrated program plans • Urban and rural programs • Cultural considerations in Curriculum Development 3.2 Concerns in curriculum implementation.UNIT-IV CURRICULUM IN NATIONAL PERSPECTIVE 4.1 Comparative study of school curricula-CBSE, NCERT 4.2 Higher education curriculumUNIT-V PHYSICAL EDUCATION AS AN EXAMINATION SUBJECT 5.1 Need and importance of assessment and evaluation 5.2 Evaluation techniques in physical education 5.3 Criterion and non criterion based evaluation (Assignments, observations, projects, quiz competitions, group discussions, presentations, skill, prowess, and game performance)PRACTICAL 1. Developing a curriculum plan with specific reference to various segments of population 2. Content analysis/critical analysis of any curriculum REFERENCES 1. Gupta Rakesh, Sharma Akhilesh, and Sharma Santosh, Professional Preparation and Curriculum Design in Physical Education & sports Sciences, New Delhi, Friends, 2004 2. Krik David, Physical Education and Curriculum Study, Kent, Croom Helm, 1988 3. Hoover. Kenneth H., The Professional Teacher’s Handbook, Boston, Allyn and Bacoon, 1972 4. Sandhu Kiran, Professional Preparation and Career Development in Physical Education, New Delhi, Friends, 2004 5. Wessel Janet A, and Kelly Luke, Achievement-Based Curriculum Development in Physical Education, Philadepia, Lea and Febiger, 1986 6. Zeigler E.F, Professional and Scholarly Foundation of Physical Education and Kinesiology, Sports Educational Technologies, 2007 7. Sandhu Kiran, Trends and Development in Professional Preparation in Physical Education, New Delhi, Friends Publication, 2006 8. Adams William C. Foundation of Physical Education Exercise and Sports Sciences, Philadepia, 1991. 183
  • 184. PAPER NO. – IV (iv) Module-IV SUBJECT SPECIALIZATION – SPORT SOCIOLOGYUNIT-I SPORT AND RELIGION 1.1 Definition and concept of religion 1.2 Similarities and differences between religion and sports as a social phenomenon 1.3 Challenges in combining sports and religion 1.4 Role of religion in sports developmentUNIT-II SPORT AND RESEARCH METHODS 2.1 Methods in sports sociology (field work), and survey 2.2 Check list and participant observation 2.3 Interview - structured and non- structured 2.4 Content analysis of historical evidence 2.5 Theme - identification in qualitative researchUNIT-III SPORT AND COMMUNICATION 3.1 Concept and theories of mass communication 3.1 Television and sport 3.2 Impact of media on sports and vice versa 3.3 Role of media in making and breaking images in sport 3.4 Ethics of sport journalismUNIT-IV SPORT AND COMMERCIALIZATION, GLOBALIZATION PROCESS 4.1 Emergence and growth of commercial sport 4.2 Impact of commercialization and changes in sport 4.3 Globalization discourse and sport 4.4 National identity and competitive sport 4.5 Club culture and its impact on sport developmentUNIT-V SPORT AND FUTURE 5.1 Ideological issues in sport 5.2 Visualization of major sport forms in the future 5.3 Changing trends and forecasts in the growth of sports 5.4 National sports policy – Challenging and constraintsPRACTICAL AND ASSIGNMENT: 1. Student alienation scale, superstition scale 2. Write a paper on a comparative analysis of selected religions contributing to sport by using Weber’s approach 3. Make a comparison of newspaper coverage of six sports, (three individual and three team sport) evaluate the impact of coverage on the popularity of each sport 4. Analyze new trends in social research specifically in relation to qualitative and quantitative techniques at international level and compare with research work in India REFERENCESSociology 1. Bhusan, V. and Sachdeva, An Introduction to Sociology, Delhi: Kitab, 2003. 2. IGNOU, The Study of Society - Understanding Sociology, Delhi - IGNOU, 2007. 3. Inkeles, A. Ed., What Is Sociology, ND : Prentice Hall, 1997. 4. Jain, Rachna, Sports Sociology, New Delhi: KSK, 2005. 5. Kanwal Jeet, S., Sport Sociology, ND : Friends Pub., 2000. 6. Mitchell, G.D. Ed., Dictionary of Sociology, U.K : Routledge, 1999. 7. Sharma, R. N, Urban Sociology, ND : Surjeet Pub., 1993. 8. Singh, Bhupinder, Sports Sociology, New Delhi : Friends, 2004. 9. Turner, B., Cambridge Dictionary of Sociology, U.K., Cambridge, U.N. Press., 2006. 184
  • 185. PAPER NO. – IV (iv) Module-IV SUBJECT SPECIALIZATION – SPORT MANAGEMENT ORGANIZATION OF SPORTS EVENTS AND ALLIED SERVICESUNIT-I INTRODUCTION 1.1 Meaning and concept of sports events management 1.2 Type of sports events 1.3 Allied services 1.4 Organizational structure of sports event.UNIT-II FACILITIES MANAGEMENT 2.1 Need of facilities for promotion of sports and fitness 2.2 Type of facilities 2.3 Development and maintenance of facilities 2.4 InsuranceUNIT-III VOLUNTARISM 3.1 Meaning and concept of voluntarism in sports 3.2 Types of volunteers 3.3 Training and maintenance of volunteers 3.4 Incentives – duties and responsibilitiesUNIT-IV OFFICE MAINTENANCE AND SUPERVISION 4.1 Meaning and concept of office management 4.2 Meaning, concept and need of supervision 4.3 Function of office 4.4 Official correspondenceUNIT-V EVENT AND SERVICES MANAGEMENT 5.1 Identification of events/ services 5.2 Bidding process 5.3 Preparation of conduct of events/providing services 5.4 Protocol, ceremonies and schedule REFERENCES Sport Management 1. Allen, L.A. Management & Organization. Kogakusha Co. Tokyo, 1988. 2. Hert, Renis, New Patterns of Management, McGraw Hill, 1961. 3. Sivia, G.S. Sports Management in Universities, New Delhi: A.I.U. Deen Dayal Upadhyaya Marg, 1991. 4. Sandhu, K. Sports Dynamics: Psychology, Sociology and Management 185
  • 186. ADD-ON COURSESS. Title of the PaperNo.1. Sports Nutrition and Exercise Prescription / Advance Fitness Assessment & Exercise Prescription2. Sports Field Technology3. Gymnasium Operations4. Computer Applications in Physical Education & Sports5. Life Saving Skills & Disaster Management6. Adventure Sports Leadership Training7. Sports and Community Volunteer Leadership8. Sports for All9. Physical Education for All10. Study of Olympics 186
  • 187. Add-on 1 : SNEP SPORTS NUTRITION AND EXERCISE PRESCRIPTIONCOURSE DESCRIPTION: This course emphasis on the scientific evidence of strong link of good nutrition tooverall health and well being of the sedentary and athletic population. It shall take the studentsprogressively through each phase of exercise testing and prescription for health and fitness.COURSE OBJECTIVES: 1. To establish the relationship of nutrition to health and well being. 2. To describe the fundamentals of Nutrient functions in the human body 3. Learn to make a comprehensive nutrient analysis 4. To focus on aspects of Nutrition for Athletes and other population 5. To define exercise guidelines that clarifies the safest, most effective and most efficient manner for exercise participation 6. Practical application of the knowledge and skills during exercise testing and prescriptionUNIT-1 FUNDAMENTALS OF NUTRITION APPLICATIONS IN WELLNESS 1.1 Nutrition: Relationship to Health and Well Being: • The essential nutrient and their function in the human body • Food guide pyramid • Energy mechanisms • Balancing the diet 1.2 Evaluation of the Diet: • Nutrient analysis • Achieving a balance diet • Estimating caloric needs • Nutrient supplementation guidelines • Special nutrient needs of women • Guidelines for proper hydration • Dietary guidelines • Exercise and balance diet strategy for reducing obesity 1.3 Sport Nutrition and Performance: • Nutrition in sport • Protein intake for athlete • Carbohydrate loading • Ergogenic aid: nutrition and pharmacological agents • Focus on creative supplementation • Female athlete traidUNIT-2 FUNDAMENTALS OF EXERCISING TESTING AND PRESCRIPTION 2.1 Pretest Responsibilities: • Orientation to tab instruments • Procedures • Responsibilities • General laboratory instruction • Calibration of lab instruments • Risk factor evaluation • Medical history and evaluation • Informed consent 2.2 Guidelines for Fitness Testing • Purpose for fitness testing • Pretesting situation: administration guidelines • Testing and post testing situation: administrative guidelines • Health appraisal flow chart • Readiness K exercise PAR-Q • Cardiorespiratory fitness Assessment: administration suggestion • Selection of cardiorespiratory fitness test: administration guidelines • Protocol guidelines • Exercise guidelines for special population • The expectant mother 187
  • 188. • The aged • The childrens • People with health disordersUNIT-3 INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH FITNESS ASSESSMENT TECHNIQUES: 3.1 Orientation to Basis Measurement Technique Assessment of health rate Assessment of blood Pressure Body composition assessment 3.2 Health Fitness Assessment Techniques • Submaximal exercise protected • Assessment of body fat • Evaluation of muscular strength and endurance • ECG Placement and monitor operations • Energy cost of uphill walking • Energy cost of running • Metabolic calculationUNIT-4 EXERCISE PRESCRIPTION PRINCIPLES 4.1 Principles of Exercise Prescription for Health Fitness • Principles of Cardiorespiratory Exercise Prescription • Principles of Muscular Flexibility Prescription • Principles of Strength Training 4.2 Exercise Stages for Prescription Progression • Initial conditioning Stage • Improvement stage • Maintenance Stage 4.3 Assessing Goals and Commitment to Exercise • Assessment of health related fitness • Behaviour modification (developing an exercise Prescription to achieve goal) • Monitoring behaviour • Periodic Re-evaluation of health related fitness • Modification of behaviour • Continual Monitoring of behaviourUNIT-5 PRACTICAL IMPLEMENTATIONS IN EXERCISE TESTING G AND EXERCISE PRESCRIPTION 5.1 Assessment of the below given parameters in various population Heart rate Blood pressure Skin fold measure Girth measure and other lab techniques 5.2 Evaluation of health related fitness components (Lab/field) 5.3 ECG placement and monitor operations during rest exercise 5.4 Personal fitness programming 5.5 The exercise log 5.6 Muscular strength and endurance periodization training 5.7 Personalized cardiorepiratory prescription 5.8 Metabolic calculation 5.9 Estimating caloric needs on day to day basis 5.10 Calculating exercise heart rate range 5.11 Preparation of an exercise programme of varied population with different goals REFERENCES1. Steven, N. Blair. ACSM Fitness Book Human Kinetics 20032. Acevedo, Edmund O and Starks, Michael A. Exercising Testing and Prescription Lab Manual Human Kinetics 20033. Howley, Edward T. , Franks, Don B. Health Fitness Instructor’s Handbook Yed Human Kinetics20034. Hoeger, Werner W.K, Hoeger, Sharon A. Principles and labs for Fitness and Well Ness (7 Ed) Wads worth Thompson 2004 188
  • 189. 5. Ann-F cowlin. Women’s Fitness Programme Development Human Kinetics 20026. Vivian H. Heyward. Advanced Fitness Assessment Exercise Prescription (2ed) Human Kinetics 1991 189
  • 190. Add-on 1: AFAEP ADDVANCE FITNESS ASSESSMENT AND EXERCISE PRESCRIPTIONCOURSE DESCRIPTION: This course is updated on the latest standards, guidelines and research,allowing the students to explore the fundamentals, research findings and current issues in he field ofexercise testing and prescription for total fitness. Updates on assessing the health related fitnesscomponents, applying principles and guidelines for harming diverse populations, and preventing varioushealth disorders.COURSE OBJECTIVES: 1. To understand role of physical activity in the quality of life. 2. To follow practical guidelines for screening, test supervision. 3. To modifying activity for diverse population. 4. To write and implement appropriate fitness exercise prescription. 5. To define exercise guidelines that clarifies the safest, most effective and most efficient manner for exercise participation. UNIT-1UNIT-1 PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, FITNESS, HEALTH AND CHRONIC DISEASE 1.1 Physical activity and Health: An Overview • Connections between physical activity and health. • What we know about physical activity, fitness and health • Chronic disease: an overview • Cardiovascular disease, hyper cholestremia & dyslipidemia, • Diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome. • Musculo skeletal disorder, obesity and overweight. 2.2 Prevention of Premature Health Problems and role of Physical Activity Prevention of premature health problems Allocation of resources to boost physical activity Components of physical fitness Behavior supporting fitness and healthUNIT-2 FUNDAMENTALS OF EXERCISEING TESTING AND PRESCRIPTION 2.1 Pretest responsibilities: Orientation to laboratory instruments Procedures Responsibilities Calibration of lab instruments Risk factor evaluation Medical history Informed consent 2.2 Guidelines for fitness testing and exercise prescription Purpose of fitness testing Administrative guidelines: pretest, test and post test situation Health appraisal flow chart Physical Activity Readiness questionnaire (PAR-Q) Administrative suggestions for cardiorespiratory fitness assessment Administrative guidelines: selection of cardiorespiratory fitness test Protocol guidelines Exercise guidelines for diversified population (The expectant mother, the older Adult, The children, people with health Disorder)UNIT-3 INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH AND FITNESS ASSESSMENT TECHNIQUES 190
  • 191. 3.1 Orientation to basic measurement technique Assessment of heart rate, blood pressure, anthropometric measures, body Composition, ECG placement and monitor operation. 3.2 Health Related fitness assessment Assessment of cardiorespiratory fitness (Lab and Field) Submaximal exercise protocol Body composition assessment Evaluation of muscular strength and endurance (Lab/Field) Evaluation of flexibility (Lab/Field)UNIT-4 PRINCIPLE OF EXERCISE PRESCRIPTION 4.1 Principles of exercise prescription for health & fitness Principles of cardiorespiratory exercise prescription Principles of strength training Principles of muscular flexibility prescription 4.2 Progression through exercise prescription: Guidelines for progressing through three stages of exercise programme: Initial conditioning stage Improvement stage Maintenance stage 4.3 Assessing goals and commitment to exercise Health related fitness assessment Behavior modification (developing an exercise prescription to achieve goal) Monitoring behavior Periodic reevaluation of health related fitness Modification of behavior Continual monitoring of behaviorUNIT-5 EXERCISE PRESCRIPTION FOR HEALTH AND FITNESS 5.1 Exercise prescription for health related fitness Cardiorespiratory fitness: prescribing exercise, monitoring Exercise intensity, short term and long term response to exercise, program Selection, exercise recommendation for the unlisted masses and fit population..NOTE: While prescribing as well as assessing fitness prior to work/ exercise, medical clearance should betaken for each individual. As far as possible the entire exercise should be carried out under the supervisionof qualified registered medical practitioner. 191
  • 192. Add-on 2: SFTSPORTS FIELD TECHNOLOGY 192
  • 193. Add-on 3 : GO GYMNASIUM-OPERATIONSUNIT-I NUTRITION AND WEIGHT MANAGEMENT 1.1 Concept of nutrition and health, balanced diet, dietary aids and gimmicks 1.2 Energy and activity, calculating calorie intake and expenditure 1.3 Obesity, anorexia and related health problems – measurements and management 1.4 Weight management programmesUNIT-II AEROBIC FITNESS 2.1 Understanding of various forms of aerobics- floor aerobics, step – aerobics, weight Aerobics and aqua aerobics 2.2 Training effects of aerobic fitness on various physiological systems namely skeletal Muscular, circulatory and respiratory 2.3 Improvement of aerobic fitness 2.4 Aerobic fitness programmeUNIT-III GYM-OPERATION 3.1 Location and Establishment of gym (Publicity, policy, reception, information, Registration, offer of programmes), Procurement, placement & maintenance of gym Equipments 3.2 Marketing, clientage, Enrolments, record keeping, social activities, Public Relations, Individualized/group grooming programme, basic concepts of financial management 3.3 Gym-instructor – qualification, qualities, pay-roll, Performance – evaluation, grooming and presentation 3.4 Introduction to different exercise equipment 3.5 Gym management – Costing, Balance sheet, Promotional plansUNIT-IV EVALUATION 4.1 Measurement of Weight and Height, Calculating BMI (Body Mass Index ) 4.2 Measurement of Fitness Components – Flexibility (Sit and Reach Test, Hip Bend and Toe Touch) Strength (Sit-Ups, Leg-Raise for Minimal Strength) Cardiovascular Endurance (One-mile run, Physical Efficiency test, Harvard step test) 4.3 Self- evaluation –Personal Health and Well-beingUNIT-V EXERCISE SCHEDULES 5.1 Exercise schedules – Aerobics, Fitness and Weight Management 5.2 Yoga( Any Five Asanas)PRACTICALS 1. Calculating BMI 2. Flexibility Test (Sit and reach test, hip bend and toe touch) 3. Strength Test (Bend knee sit ups, leg raise for minimal strength) 4. Cardiovascular endurance test (Harvard step test, cooper 12/9 min. run) 5. Self evaluation- (Personal health and well being) 6. Any five asanas 7. Aerobic schedule 8. Weight management 193
  • 194. Add-on 4 : CAPES COMPUTER APPLICATION IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND SPORTSUNIT-1 - General Introduction to Computer Hardware and Software - Introduction to Printer, Scanner, Pen Drive, External Hard Disk - Introduction to Operating System - M S Word (Limited Function) - Application to Physical Education and SportsUNIT-2 - Excel and Access - Creating File - Short Listing - Different Applications (Limited) - Data Base Management - Statistical ApplicationsUNIT-3 - Power Point (General Introduction) - Preparation of Slides/Presentation/Different Application - AnimationUNIT-4 - General Introduction to Multimedia - Abode Photoshop and Studio (Basic) - Abode Premier (Basic Introduction) - Animation (Basic Introduction) - Pinacle (Basic Introduction)UNIT-5 - General Introduction to Information Technology - Construction of web page (any One) - E-Mail (Construction, operating etc.) - Web Search - Computer Based Physical Education and Sports Management - Computer Aided Analysis 194
  • 195. Add-on 5 : LSSDM LIFE SAVING SKILL & DISASTER MANAGEMENTUNIT-I LIFE SAVING SKILL 1.1 Meaning and concept of life saving skill 1.2 Need and importance of life saving skillUNIT-II DISASTER MANAGEMENT 2.1 Meaning and concept of disaster management 2.2 Need and importance of disaster managementUNIT-III CLASSIFICATION OF DISASTER MANAGEMENT 3.1 Natural Disaster Earth quack Flood Drought Cyclone Tsunami Landslide Avalanche Heat wave Cold wave Fire Coastal and sea erosion Biological disaster endemic epidemic disaster 3.2 Men made disaster War Terrorist attack Radio active hazardUNIT-IV SAFETY MEASURE & FIRST-AID 4.1 Meaning and concept of safety measure & first-aid 4.2 Prevention of disastersUNIT-V DISASTER MANAGEMENT 5.1 Steps of disaster management 5.2 Various act and agencies in disaster management Disaster management act Local emergency management agency Role of voluntary/NGO agency National disaster management agency Dos and don’t and during disaster 195
  • 196. Add-on 6 : ASLT ADVENTURE SPORTS LEADERSHIP TRAININGUNIT-I UNDERSTANDING ADVENTURE SPORTS 1.1 Meaning, aim and objectives of adventure sports 1.2 Adventure sports as a value concept 1.3 Range of adventure sports 1.4 Types of activitiesUNIT-II ORGANIZATION 2.1 Plans and facilities 2.2 Material requirement 2.3 Organization of adventure sports as leadership, recreational and competition activities 2.4 Insurance, travels, safety and healthUNIT-III LEADERSHIP 3.1 Meaning and responsibilities 3.2 Identification and use of resources 3.3 Problem solving as a process decision making and leadership 3.4 Group norms-Team building, Sharing & Caring, Personality developmentUNIT-IV EVALUATION 4.1 Why and what to evaluate 4.2 Programmes, facilities, volunteers and organizationsUNIT-V PRACTICAL 5.1 Developing departmental paper 5.2 Rock climbing, cycling, nature exploration, rescue operations-Tents pitching, knots and ladders etc., Campfire/Recreational programs REFERENCES 1. Sport Leadership Course created by the Olympic Solidarity Program of the International Olympic Committee to assist sport administrators, 1999. 2. Sport Administration Manual Lausanne, Switzerland, IOC, 2000. 3. Young Leader Teacher Resource Material, Published by Youth Sport Trust and Sport England, U. K. 2007. 196
  • 197. Add-on 7 : SCVL SPORT AND COMMUNITY VOLUNTEER LEADERSHIPUNIT-I UNDERSTANDING “VOLUNTEERISM” 1.1 Meaning, need and responsibilities 1.2 Selection, training, rostering, role specific training, uniform communication 1.3 Commitment of volunteers to self, teams, community and venueUNIT-II STRUCTURE OF WORK FORCE, ROLES AND DEPLOYMENT 2.1 Volunteers as managers and in different capacities 2.2 Attributes of volunteers 2.3 Preparing to be a volunteer 2.4 Areas of placementUNIT-III CODE OF CONDUCT AND CUSTOMER CARE DURING THE GAME 3.1 Ethical practices 3.2 Under the venue and location of volunteering 3.3 Customer care and customer friendly service, plans and provisions 3.4 Dealing with unusual situationsUNIT-IV SAFETY AND COMMUNICATION 4.1 Safety for all 4.2 First aid 4.3 Disaster management 4.4 CommunicationUNIT-V PRACTICAL 5.1 Developing departmental paper 5.2 Volunteer assignment on field in schools and colleges community REFERENCES 1. Sport Leadership Course created by the Olympic Solidarity Program of the International Olympic Committee to assist sport administrators, 1999. 2. Sport Administration Manual Lausanne, Switzerland, IOC, 2000. 3. Young Leader Teacher Resource Material, Published by Youth Sport Trust and Sport England, U. K. 2007. 197
  • 198. Add-on 8: SFA SPORTS FOR ALLUNIT – I INTRODUCTION: 1.1 Definition of sports and it’s classification 1.2 Concept, meaning and significance of sports for all & all for sports 1.3 Relation of physique & success in sports 1.4 Sport health, personality, figure, rehabilitation, recreation, fitness, wellness and gloryUNIT – II SPORTS FOR HEALTH AND FITNESS: 2.1 Meaning, Definition & Components of Health and Fitness 2.2 Role of Sports in Promotion of Health & FitnessUNIT – III SPORTS FOR EXCELLENCE 3.1 Meaning, definition & categories of competitive sports 3.2 Relation of sports performance with success in competition 3.3 Deterrents & constraints in achieving sports excellenceUNIT – IV SPORTS FOR RECRATION 4.1 Concept & meaning of recreation 4.2 Relation between sports & recreation(recreational sports) 4.3 Role of sports in human recreation 4.4 Social factors promoting recreation & its values 4.5 Motives of recreational participationUNIT – V SPORTS TRAINING & COUNSELLING 5.1 Concept & meaning of sports training & counseling 5.2 Methods of training : technical & tactical 5.3 Principles of sports training 5.4 Components of sports training( intensity, regularity, warming up, cool down) 5.5 Role of sports counselor in selecting sports 5.6 Role of sports counselor in motivating for regular participation in sports ActivitiesPRACTICALS1. Presentation of Workbook for Hobbies of Choice2. Project Work on Conducting Sports Competition ( Formation of fixtures and various Committees)3. Development of Short term Training Program4. Development of Community Recreation Program5. Development of Community Relaxation Program 198
  • 199. Add-on 9: SFAPHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR ALL 199
  • 200. Add-on 10: SO STUDY OF OLYMPICSUNIT-I THE OLYMPIC MOVEMENT 1.1 The ancient Olympic games 1.2 The Olympic movement 1.3 Aims and symbols of the Olympic movement 1.4 The International Olympic Committee (IOC)UNIT-II STRUCTURE OF THE OLYMPIC MOVEMENT 2.1 The National Olympic Committee(NOC) 2.2 The International Sports Federations(IFs) 2.3 The National Sports Federations(NFs) 2.4 VolunteerismUNIT-III THE OLYMPIC GAMES 3.1 Organization 3.2 The international bid process for selecting sites for the games 3.3 Participation in Olympic games 3.4 Women and sportsUNIT-IV IOC PROGRAMMES 4.1 Olympic academy 4.2 Olympic solidarity 4.3 Olympic museum 4.4 Paralympic gamesUNIT-V IOC INTERESTS 5.1 Sports for all 5.2 Culture, olympism, winning, participation and universality of the games 5.3 Drug abuse and doping 5.4 Arbitration and dispute resolution 200
  • 201. 2.5 One-Year Bachelor’s of Physical Education (B.P.Ed.)* ORDINANCES FOR THE AWARD OF POST GRADUATE 2.5.1 ORDINANCES AND COURSE OF STUDYBACHELOR OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION (B.P.Ed.) - ONE YEAR COURSEELIGIBILITY:1. (a) Graduate with Physical education as a major subject with 50% marks OR (b) Graduate in Physical Education (i.e., B. P. E. of three-year duration) with 50% marks OR (c) Graduate with at least 50% marks, having represented State/University in sports/games/athletics. OR (d) Graduate with at least 50% marks, who represented in inter-collegiate sports/games tournaments or passed basic course in adventure sports. OR (e) Graduate with 50% marks with ‘C’ certificate in NCC.2. For those in category 1 (a) to (e) above who are position holders (1st, 2nd or 3rd) in State Level sports/games and those who have participated in the National level sports/games, the minimum percentage of marks in the Graduation shall be at least 45%.3. There shall be relaxation of marks/reservation of seats for SC/ST/OBC as per the Rules of the Central Government/ University of Delhi, Delhi.AGE REQUIREMENTS:No person shall be eligible for admission to the University in B.P.Ed. unless she/he attains the age of twentyyears before the first day of October in the year in which she/he seeks admission. provided that the Vice-Chancellor of the University of Delhi may on the basis of individual merits, relax the age limit upto a maximumperiod of one year. Candidate under this category shall be permitted to seek provisional registration subject torelaxation of age being permitted by the Vice-Chancellor. Request for relaxation of the age shall be made by thecandidates themselves through the Department of Physical Education & Sports Sciences, University of Delhi.PROCEDURE FOR ADMISSION:Candidate desirous of seeking admission to the Bachelor of Physical Education (B.P.Ed.) will apply for registrationat Department of Physical Education & Sports Sciences. The form duly filled and accompanied by all relevantcertificates i.e. (a) Marks sheet of the Degree Examination of all papers in case of part-wise Examination (b)Original Degree/Provisional Certificate (If the degree not issued) (c) Matric/SSC Certificate for verification of dateof Birth.Reservations for Schedule Caste/Schedule Tribes will be as per the norms of the University of Delhi, Delhi.Note: The candidate seeking admission to Bachelor of Physical Education shall have to qualify in PhysicalFitness Test laid down by the Department of Physical Education & Sports Sciences, University of Delhi, Delhi.EXAMINATION ELIGIBILITY CONDITION:i) The students will strictly observe the attendance requirement; otherwise they will not be allowed to appear in the final examination. The attendance requirement will be 75% inclusive of Theory & Practicals. However, the Proxy Attendance may be awarded to the students not more than ¼ of the total attendance for the assignment as specified in Calendar of University of Delhi.ii) No candidate will be allowed to appear in the final examination if she/he joins any service during the course of study. However, the in-service candidate has to procure the “No Objection Certificate” as well as Sanctioned Leave for the entire duration of the course, at the time of admission to the Institute.iii) The female candidate will not be allowed to continue the course of study for the concerned academic year/s, if she carries pregnancy. 201
  • 202. MARKING SCHEME:B.P.Ed. (Bachelor of Physical Education: One Year)SECTION-A: PART-I: THEORY PAPERS: Name of the Paper Marks Internal TotalPaper (Theory) AssessmentPart I (Theory)I History & Principal of Physical Education 75 25 100II Organization & Administration of Physical 75 25 100 EducationIII Anatomy & Physiology of Exercise 75 25 100IV. Educational & Sports Psychology 75 25 100V Methods of Teaching, Officiating & Coaching 75 25 100VI Optional Group- I : Students have to choose one paper from each group from the following: Optional Group- ‘A’ 35 15 50 Kinesiology Health Education & First aid (iii) Measurement & Evaluation in Phy. Edu. Optional Group- ‘B’ Recreation 35 15 50 Supervision Yoga TOTAL 445 155 600VII Part-II: Skill & Prowess: (Activity Course) Sessional Work based on yearly assessment of each candidate 400VII Part – III Teaching Practice: (a) internal lesson (20) 100 100 (b) three final external lesson (40:30:30) = 100 (Marks: Athletics 40, Individual Game 30 & Term Game 30) TOTAL PART I + II + III = 600 + 400 + 200 = 1200PASSING SCHEME:Candidate shall have to pass in all the three parts of Examination i.e. Theory, Skill & Prowess & Teaching Practiceseparately as well as in the examination as a whole. The minimum pass marks will be 40% in all the partsindividually and in aggregate. The candidate must secure 40% in each paper (Theory & Practical separately) inPart I. Degree of Bachelor of Physical Education will be awarded on the basis of the aggregate marks for theentire examination as follows:i) Distinction : 75% and above.ii) First Class : 60% and above but less than 75%. 202
  • 203. iii) Second Class : 50% and above but less than 60%.iv) Third Class : 40% and above but less than 50%.2.6 Three-Year Bachelor’s Degree in Physical Education, Health Education and Sports Sciences (B.Sc.)* 2.6.1 ORDINANCES FOR THE AWARD OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE- PHYSICAL EDUCATION, HEALTH EDUCATION AND SPORTS [B.Sc. (PEHES)]– THREE YEARS DEGREE COURSEI. ADMISSIONA. ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA:A candidate seeking admission to B.Sc.(Physical Education, Health Education & Sports) Part-I for the degree ofBachelor of Physical Education, Health Education & Sports shall satisfy the following criteria:-i) A candidate seeking admission to B.Sc. (P.E.H.E.&S.) Part-I course must have passed XII Examination of the Central Board of Secondary Education, New Delhi, or an examination recognized as equivalent there to with at least 45% marks in the aggregate.ii) The aggregate marks shall be determined on the basis of one language and three best subjects.iii) No person shall be qualified for admission to the B.Sc.(P.E.H.E. & S.) unless he/she has passed the examination, whereas, supplementary/Compartment candidates are not eligible for admission.iv) Person who has been convicted of an offense involving moral turpitude shall be admitted to a course of study or permitted to take any examination of the University until a period of two years has elapsed from the date of expiry of the sentence imposed on him. However, the Academic Council may in a special case, exempt any person from the operation of this rule.v) The candidates who have appeared at any of the qualifying examination but whose results have not been declared may apply for admission. Such candidate, if included in the final merit list of admission must submit their results of the qualifying examination in original to the authorities. In case of non-submission of result of qualifying examination, such candidate shall forfeit the right to admission.B. AGE: -The candidate shall attain minimum 17 years of age before the first day of October of the year in which he/sheseeks admission to the B.Sc. (P.E.H.E. &S.) Part-I. However, relaxation of age limit upto a max. of one year onthe basis of individual merits may be made by the Vice-Chancellor, University of Delhi through the Principal of theInstitution and/or Department of Physical Education & Sports Sciences, University of Delhi concerned.C. FITNESS: - (i) The candidate shall submit a medical fitness certificate duly signed by a Registered Medical officer in the prescribed form of admission to carry out the vigorous physical and academic activities concerning curriculum and co-curricular activities, which runs throughout the year. If due to one or another reason s/he fails to carry over above-mentioned activities, her/his right of admission will be forfeited. (ii) Physical Fitness – A candidate have to qualify the prescribed Physical Fitness test.D. ATTENDANCE: -A candidate shall be eligible for appearing in the Annual Examination for B.Sc. (P.E.H.E. & Sports) Part-I, II & IIIonly if he/she has a minimum 66% attendance in Theory and Practical classes in aggregate.A candidate who participate in Co-curricular activities and/or extra curricular activities during the course of studyin a year shall be entitled for proxy attendance in the activities duly recognized by the University and approvedby the concerned teacher Incharge and Principal of the college (e.g. Inter-college tournament/District/State/Inter-varsity/National/International/Invitational tournaments/ Camps/ Debates/Drama/Socialrelevance etc.). Such proxy attendance under no circumstances shall not exceed more than 1/3 of the totalattendance (Theory and Practical in aggregate).However, incase of serious illness and/or accident, a candidate, will not be given any proxy attendance undersuch circumstances. Such student can join the college in the next academic session on regular basis by paymentof requisite fee prescribed.E. DURATION:-The total length of Bachelor of Physical Education, Health Education & Sports (B.Sc. P.E.H.E.&S.) Part-I, II & IIIshall not exceed six years from the first year of initial admission to the course and 5 years from the admission tothe second year. 203
  • 204. F. NATURE OF THE COURSE:-The Bachelor of Science (Physical Education, Health Education and Sports) is a regular nature of course on fulltime basis.G. RESERVATIONS:- i) Reservations for Schedule Caste/Schedule Tribes will be as per the norms of the University/Central Government and the candidate under these categories will be entitled for the relaxation of 5% marks in the minimum eligibility criteria in the qualifying academic examination.5% of the seats are reserved for the children/widows/wives of the officers & men of the Armed Forces includingPara Military Personnel killed or disabled in the action.II. THE COURSE OF STUDY AND EXAMINATIONS SHALL BE AS FOLLOWS FOR B.SC. (P.E.H.E. & S.) PART-I, PART-II & PART-III EXAMINATIONS:At the end of the first academic session, the candidate shall be examined in Part-I of the course as:-A. B.SC. (P.E.H.E. & S.) PART-I: Maximum MarksPaper Name of the Paper Theory Internal Practical Marks Assessme Marks nt Qualifying English *75 25 Qualifying Hindi *75 25I Foundations of Physical Education & Sports 75 25II Anatomy & Physiology 50 25 25III Theory of Games & Sports 50 25 25 (Game of Specialization-one out of listed Sports)**IV Theory of Games & Sports(a) Track & Field 25 10 15(b) Gymnastics 25 10 15(c) Yoga 25 10 15 TOTAL 250 105 95Theory and Practical= 250 + 105 ; Internal Assessment 95; Grand Total =450 Marks*Not included in Grand Total** Athletics, Basketball, Badminton, Cricket, Football, Hockey, Handball, Judo, Kabaddi, Kho-Kho, Volleyball,Table-Tennis, Gymnastics & Yoga .The Written/Theory and Practical Examinations shall be conducted by the University of Delhi through theInstitute concerned and the approved Examiners of the University of Delhi for each paper separately (Theory aswell as Practical Examination).B. B.Sc.(P.E.H.E. & S.) Part-II Maximum MarksPaper Name of the Paper Theory Internal Practical Assessment Marks Qualifying English *75 25V Health Education, Safety Education, First-aid & 75 25 RehabilitationVI Physiology of Exercise 50 25 25VII Theory of Games & Sports 50 25 25 (Game of Specialization-continued from Part-I)VIII Theory of Games & Sports Track & Field/Swimming/*Water 25 10 15 sports/Gymnastics/Aerobics & Dance 25 10 15IX a) Vocational Group Activity 25 10 15 Activity Group-II (Any one) b) One Vocational Course out of 25 10 15 - Sports Industry & Management - Health Education - Physiotherapy 204
  • 205. - Sports Journalism TOTAL 275 115 110 Theory and Practical = 275 + 110 = 385 Internal Assessment = 115 marks Grand Total = 500 marks *Not included in Grand Total*(i) The COC has strongly recommended the above areas in paper VIII subject to the availability of the curriculum. (ii) Subject to the including of this in the first year where by the first year of study will have paper of Track & Field, Gym & Yoga of 100 marks each whereas paper VIII of II year will have swimming / water and adventure sports. C. B.Sc.(P.E.H.E. & S.) Part-III: Maximum Marks Paper Name of the Paper Theory Internal Practical Marks Assessme Marks nt X Psychology & Sociology of Physical Education 50 25 25 and Sports XI Fundamentals of Sports Training 50 25 25 XII Theory of Games & Sports 50 25 25 (Game of Specialization-continued from Part- I) XIII Kinsiology & Biomechanics 50 25 25 XIV. a) Vocational Group Activity 25 10 15 Activity Group-III (Any one) b) One Vocational Course out of - Sports Industry & Management 25 10 15 - Health Education - Physiotherapy - Sports Journalism TOTAL 250 120 130 Theory and Practical = 250 + 130 Internal Assessment = 120 ---------------- Grand Total = 500 Marks ========= III. MEDIUM OF EXAMINATION: The medium of instruction & examination shall be English or Hindi for B.Sc. (P.E.H.E. & S.) Part-I, II & III course. IV Pass percentage and classification of successful candidate: - i) The minimum marks required to pass the qualifying examination shall be 33% in each paper. ii) The minimum marks required to pass the examination at the end of each year (Part-I examination, Part II examination and Part III examination) shall be 36% in each paper (theory and practical separately) and 36% in the aggregate. If there are parts of any paper the candidate is required to secure pass marks in each part of that paper. However, for calculation of papers for promotion to next class or exemption, the whole paper will be treated as one unit only. The passing criteria will be applied separately to the practical examination as well as to the total of the theory examination and Internal Assessment. Provided that at the end of the Ist year, a candidate who does not pass the Part-I examination but has secured at least 25% marks in the aggregate of the all the papers(excluding qualifying) taken together (including Internal Assessment and practical tests, if any) and has not secured pass marks in two papers, may be permitted to proceed to the 2nd year class, if otherwise eligible. However, he/she can appear in remaining paper/s of Part-I alongwith the Part-II examination. 205
  • 206. Similarly, at the end of the 2nd year, a candidate who does not pass the Part II examination (including a candidate who has not passed the Part I examination also) but has secured at least 25% marks in the aggregate of all the papers (excluding qualifying) taken together (including Internal Assessment and practical tests, if any) of the Part II examination and has not secured pass marks in two papers of 2nd year, may be permitted to proceed to the 3rd year class. Such candidates can take the examination in the remaining paper/s of Part I and/or Part II alongwith the Part III examination. A candidate for the III examination who has not passed but has secured at least 25% marks in the aggregate of Part III examination (including internal assessment and practical tests, if any) shall be exempted from re-appearing in those papers in which he/she has secured pass marks. iii Any candidate for the B.Sc. (Physical Education, Health Education & Sports) Part-III Examination, who attains the pass standard, but fails to attain the necessary standards in either or both the qualifying papers shall be required to appear in the remaining qualifying paper or papers, at a subsequent examination with in the span period of six years from the date of admission to the 1st year of the course and if successful, shall be declared to have passed the B.Sc. (Phy.Edu., Health Edu. & Sports) in the year in which he/she clears the remaining subjects.V. CLASSIFICATION OF RESULT:-The successful candidate will be classified on the combined result of B.Sc. (P.E.H.E. & S.) Part-I, II & IIIexaminations as follows:- a) Distinction: Minimum 75% marks in aggregate in Theory, Practical & Internal Assessment. b) First Division: Minimum 60% of the total marks & above but below 75% marks. c) Second Division: Minimum 50% of total marks & above but below 60%. d) Third Division: Passing with less than 50% marks in aggregate and more than 36% marks in aggregate.VI. MISCELLANEOUS: I Out of the marks allotted for internal assessment of each paper, the marks shall be awarded on the basis of tutorials, projects, assignments, class test, attendance, attitude in the class etc. II The candidate shall be promoted from B.Sc. (P.E.H.E. & S.) Part-I to Part-II or from Part II to Part III if she/he fulfills all the conditions, prescribed for promotion. III Candidate/s failing or failing to appear in the B.Sc. (P.E.H.E. & S.) Part-I /Part II/ Part III Examination shall be allowed to appear at the respective examination in the next succeeding year, only on being enrolled as an “Ex-Student” (subject to fulfilling all the examination eligibility) in accordance with the regulations prescribed in that behalf. The candidate must pass the B.Sc. (P.E.H.E. & S.) Part-I, II & III examinations with in six years duration from the academic year of first admission to the first year of the course. IV Candidates who have already secured the minimum pass marks in the practical papers at a previous examination shall not be allowed to re-appear in the practical papers as the case may be. V No candidate shall be allowed to appear in the final Annual Examination of B.Sc. (P.E.H.E. & S.) part-I, II & III, if he/she is in Service on fulltime/part-time basis before the completion of the final annual examination (Theory, Practical and Internal Assessment). However, if the candidate has the permission from the employer concerned to join the course alongwith the approved leave and “No Objection Certificate” for the entire duration of the course of the study, then the candidate shall be eligible to carry on the course and may appear in the final examination. In case of concealment of facts found/proved, the candidate shall be held responsible and action of debarring from the course and /or legal action shall be taken against him/her. VI No female candidate shall be allowed to continue the course of study for the concerned academic year/s in B.Sc. (P.E.H.E. & S.) Part-I, II & III, if she carries pregnancy. In such case, she shall be treated under Ex-Student Category to appear in the final Annual Examination/s (Practical and/or Theory) in the next academic year, if she is found fit as in no-pregnancy condition.VII GAME OF SPECIALIZATION: A candidate is required to choose one game out of the following to be carried overfor three years of the courses as Paper-III, Basketball, Badminton, Cricket, Football, Gymnastics, Hockey,Handball, Judo, Kabaddi, Kho-Kho, Table-Tennis, Athletics, Volleyball, Weightlifting and Yoga.*The addition or deletion of game of specialization shall depend upon the availability of teaching faculty andinfrastructure. 206
  • 207. VIII VOCATIONAL GROUP ACTIVITY I: Under Group Activity-I, the games offered are Basketball, Cricket, Football,Hockey, Handball, and Volleyball. A student is expected to choose any one out of the Group during the 2nd yearof the B.Sc. Course other than the games of specialization.IX VOCATIONAL GROUP ACTIVITY II: Under Group Activity-II, the games offered are Badminton, Judo, Kabaddi,Kho-Kho, Table-Tennis, and Wt. Lifting and a student is expected to choose any one out of the Group during 3rdyear of the B.Sc. Course other than the game of specialization.X VOCATIONAL COURSES: From 2nd year of B.Sc. Physical Education, Health Education & Sports to be carried overto 3rd year B.Sc. (Physical Education, Health Education & Sports) a student is expected to choose one optionalpaper as part of the paper V in B. Sc IInd year to be carried over to B. Sc (PEHE&S) III year out of thefollowing options: - - Sports Industry & Management - Health Education - Physiotherapy - Sports JournalismXI IMPROVEMENT RULES: As applicable to B.Sc. (Gen.) courseSUMMARYB.Sc Ist YearThere shall be two qualifying paper of 100 marks each (English and Hindi) and four compulsory papers. Thecompulsory examinations for qualifying papers of English and Hindi will be assessed out of 75 marks each fortheory examination whereas, the internal assessment will be out of 25 marks each. The compulsory paper (I) willbe consisting of theory examination out of 75 marks whereas internal assessment will be out of 25 marks. Thecompulsory paper (II) and (III) will be out of 50 marks for each of theory examination, 25 marks each forpractical examination and 25 marks each for internal assessment. The compulsory paper (IV) has threecompulsory options i.e. a, b, and c and each will be assessed out of 25 marks for theory examination, 15 marksfor practical examination and 10 marks for internal assessment.B.Sc IInd YearThere shall be one qualifying paper of English for 100 marks, out of which 75 marks will be for theoryexamination and 25 marks for internal assessment. The compulsory paper (V) of 100 marks will be evaluated intheory examination for 75 marks whereas 25 marks will be for internal assessment. The compulsory paper (VI) &(VII) of 100 marks will be evaluated in theory examination for 50 marks whereas 25 marks for Practicalexamination and 25 marks for Internal examination. The compulsory paper (VIII) has five options from which acandidate has to select any two options depending upon the facilities, infrastructure and teaching facultyavailable in the institution. The each options selected will be evaluated out of 25 marks in theory, 15 marks inPractical and 10 marks for Internal assessmentThe compulsory paper (IX) has two compulsory options i.e. a (Vocational Activity Group) and b (VocationalCourse) each will be assessed out of 25 marks for theory examination, 15 marks for practical examination and 10marks for internal assessment.B.Sc III yearThere shall be four papers of 100 marks each. Each paper i.e. Paper no. X, XI, XII and XIII and will be assessedthrough theory, and practical marks each of 50 and 25 marks respectively and an internal assessment of 25marks each. The paper no. (XIV) shall consist of two parts i.e. XIV (a) and XIV (b) of 50 marks each, out ofwhich 25 marks each for theory, and 15 marks each of practical and 10 marks each of internal assessment willbe examined.B.Sc. Offered at : Indira Gandhi Institute of Physical Education & Sports Sciences 207
  • 208. 2.7 PHYSICAL EDUCATION IN B.A. (PROGRAMME) 2.7.1 Application Course – Fitness, Aerobics & Gym-OperationsInactivity and its effect on health has become a global issue. Any person who gets in the vicious circle ofinactivity continues to suffer from many ill effects of inactivity, which ultimately becomes the cause of illhealth, leading to insecurity for not being well. Such modifiable causes are cardiovascular diseases,respiratory diseases and diabetes etc. The literature also indicates that nearly 30% of the total populationis suffering from obesity. Everyday news also shows concern of diminishing level of fitness and well beingamong the school children. Technological advancements and automation age is leading towards sedentarylife, which, in-turn is resulting in hypo kinetic diseases such as obesity, hypertension etc. and lowproductivity in all spheres of life, be it students, professional or any other category of people due to lack ofactivities.The change in the lifestyle of urban India is leading the masses to realize the need of exercise in variousforms, whereas, it is increasingly becoming difficult to participate in structured programmes of sports dueto the pressures of life. This has led to mushrooming of units providing alternatives of gaining fitness. Inthe scenario, forms of Aerobics have become popular, Gymnasiums too have gained immense popularity inorder to gain muscles or to loose body weight, however, the personnel involved with Aerobics or Gym-Operations are not very well-qualified and lack scientific approach. The scenario is complex as far as ratioof demand and supply is concerned. The demand is ever increasing and supply of qualified technical staffis not even marginal.In reference to such concerns, attention is called to the news item of “The Hindustan Times” dated July 31,2006, wherein, President of India is urged to intervene to bring about qualitative changes and controlstrategies on the staff working in Beauty Saloons and Fitness Centres, because the customers visit theplaces purely on faith for betterment of their body and presentation. Therefore, such a course will be apioneer effort by the University of Delhi in this direction. The knowledge of active lifestyle, healthy diet, ill-effects of tobacco, alcohol, drugs, and positive use of leisure time etc. can boost the well being ofindividuals and communities.This course will equip students with the knowledge of fitness and well-being parameters. They will developan understanding of how to use scientific methods to examine the level of fitness and adopt measures toattain optimal fitness and state of well-being. The area of study will cover the theory and appliedunderstanding of basic principles of activity and wellness, exercise physiology, fitness, training methods,nutrition, weight management and strategies for the assessment of needs of specific population. Thiscourse will also orient the participants about types of activities available as a sport / fitness / leisure-timeinvolvement for active lifestyle.This course will further equip students to understand the basic principles of Aerobics – its forms, low impactand high impact exercises according to the needs of specified population, individual grooming, role ofnutrition and diet, fads of popular diet, operation of gym-equipment, customer care, enrollments andfollow-ups, individual programming, socialization activities, procurements of gym-equipments andestablishing the gym.Career opportunities with knowledge in this area exist within the fitness industry, corporate sector and associal worker/volunteers for community participation in social sports. Career opportunities are also availablein hotels, gyms, health-clubs, spas, recreation centers, weight management centers and beauty clinics etc.PHYSICAL EDUCATION AS APPLICATION COURSE IN B.A. (PROGRAMME)CONTENTSPREAMBLETHE RATIONALE, AIM AND OBJECTIVES, OFFER OF THE COURSETHE COURSE • Application Course : Fitness, Aerobics and Gym-Operations • Syllabi • Books & Readings 208
  • 209. • Guidelines for Paper-Setter and ExaminersPREAMBLETHE RATIONALE Is the theme of broad basing Physical Education and Sports Education in University of Delhito : (a) Equip the students with the knowledge, techniques and qualification required to take-up a career inphysical education and sports; (b) Enable a student to acquire basic intellectual thinking and knowledge ofphysical education and sports in relevance to other disciplines, while providing flexibility of choices andintegrity of academic pursuits; (c) Provide for opportunities to pursue postgraduate studies in physicaleducation and sports, in continuation to the knowledge gained at Undergraduate Level; and (d) Enhancethe professional outlook by improving the likelihood of quality intake in the professional courses atpostgraduate level from amongst the people who already have educational experiences in physicaleducation and sports.It aims to ensure opportunities for : (1) Academic endeavor and career-orientation to students at large;(2) Sports Education for students having background of physical education at school level to study the area in anactive and reflective manner within mainstream courses (e.g. B.A. Programme.); (3) Inclusion of PhysicalEducation as a Discipline Course and as Application Course(s) in Restructured B.A. Programme appropriately;and (4) Postgraduate level studies in the related area of interests pursued at undergraduate level.AIM AND OBJECTIVESIt identifies and sets out a coordinated, planned and comprehensive approach to address the issuessurrounding Physical Education as : (a) Discipline Course; (b) Job-oriented Application Courses at under-graduate level; and (c) To identify the link courses at post-graduate level. The objectives of the above-identified aim are :• To impart physical education and sports as an integral part of the curriculum in educational institutions as proclaimed by the current National Policies on Education and Sports and to inculcate an understanding about the need and relevance of physical education as a discipline in the present day context.• To function as a continuum between plus two level and higher education, while making the students aware of the latest trends in physical education, fitness and its implication on our general lifestyle through correlated classroom learning with physical activities thus developing body-mind coordination.• To cater the need of academic and professional leadership while equipping the youth with the technical skills of the area to enhance their potential and providing quality service to the masses.• To enhance the quality input for professional teacher training institutes and other functionaries in the field of physical education and sports.• To provide open ended choices for taking up careers in physical education and sports and to provide trained leadership in various upcoming careers such as fitness & activity management, media & marketing etc.• To create awareness among the masses about the active & reflective areas of physical education and sports.• To pursue higher studies in the field of physical education namely post graduation, M. Phil., Ph.D. and further research.OFFER OF THE COURSEAs per the ordinance of B.A. restructured programme. 2.7.1.1 Course of Study 209
  • 210. APPLICATION COURSE FITNESS, AEROBICS & GYM-OPERATIONS OLD SYLLABUS MODIFIED SYLLABUS PART A: THEORY (50 Marks)PART A: THEORY (50 Marks) I Physical Activity and WellnessI Activity and Wellness 1. Introduction to Activity, Fitness & Wellness – 1. Physical Activity – Introduction, Benefits of Meaning, Definition, Need & Importance participation in physical activities with specific 2. Benefits of Participation in Physical Activities reference to health with Specific Reference to Mental and Personal Health 2. Wellness – Meaning, Components, Need and 3. Effect of Exercise on Various Physiological Importance Systems namely Skeletal, Muscular, Circulatory 3. Concept of Health, Well-being, Positive Life-style, and Respiratory Body Image & Quality of Life; Health-promoting 4. Introduction to Different Exercise Equipments behaviours 4. Type of Physical Activities – Walking, Jogging, Running, Cycling, Swimming, Camping, Adventure SportsII Fitness 1. Concepts and Components of Physical Fitness II Fitness and Aerobics (Health Related and Skill Related) 2. Means and Methods for the Development and 1. Physical Fitness – Concept, Components, Maintenance of Fitness Components Significance, Development and Maintenance 3. Measurement and Evaluation of Physical Fitness 4. Safety Measures and Prevention of Injuries 2. Effects of Exercise on Various Systems (Skeletal, Muscular, Circulatory and Respiratory) 3. Measurement and Evaluation of Physical Fitness – Need and ImportanceIII Nutrition and Weight Management 1. Concept of Nutrition and Health, Balanced 4. Forms of Aerobics (Floor, Step, Weight and Aqua Diet, Dietary Aids and Gimmicks Aerobics); Development of Aerobic Fitness 2. Energy and Activity, Calculating Calorie Intake Programmes and Expenditure III Nutrition and Weight Management 3. Obesity and Related Health Problems – Measurement and Management 4. Weight Management Programmes 1. Concept of Nutrition, Nutrients, Balanced Diet, Dietary Aids and Gimmicks 2. Energy and Activity – Calorie Intake and ExpenditureIV Well-Being and Dimensions of Active Life- Style 3. Obesity, Anorexia and other Related Health Problems 1. Well-being in Different Context : Active Life- style, Body Image and Environment, Obesity, 4. Weight Management – Ways and Means Anexertia and Health-related Issues IV Stress Management 2. Stress Management through Relaxation, Meditation, Yoga, Recreational Activities 1. Meaning and Causes of Stress, Common Stressors 3. Well-Being Through Leadership Activities 2. Stress and Good Health; Preventing Stress Camping, Adventure Sports and Other Training Programmes 3. Methods of Stress Management – Basic Yogic 4. Psychology of Activity and Quality of Life Methods, Relaxation, Sports and Recreational Activities 210
  • 211. V Aerobic Fitness V Gym Operations 1. Understanding of Various Forms of Aerobics – 1. Evolution of Gym Culture; Floor Aerobics, Step-Aerobics, Weight-Aerobics and Aqua-Aerobics 2. Principles of Starting a Gym - Location, Policy, 2. Training Effects of Aerobic Fitness Offer of Programmes, Budgeting, Marketing, 3. Improvement of Aerobic Fitness Clientage, Record-Keeping, Public Relations, 4. Aerobic Fitness Programmes Individualized /Group Grooming Programmes, and Reports 3. Qualification and Qualities of Gym InstructorsVI Gym-Operations 1. Location and Establishment of Gym 4. Different Exercise Equipments and their (Publicity, Policy, Reception, Information, Management Registration, Offer of Programmes) 5. Safety Measures, Prevention and Management of 2. Procurement, Placement and Maintenance of Injuries in a Gym Gym-Equipments 3. Marketing, Clientage, Enrolments, Record- Keeping, Social Activities, Public Relations, Individualized /Group Grooming Programme, Basic Concepts of Financial Management 4. Gym-Instructors – Qualification, Qualities, Pay- roll, Performance - Evaluation, Grooming and PresentationPART-B : PRACTICAL (25 Marks) PART B: PRACTICAL (Any Five ) (25 Marks) 1. Measurement of Weight and Height, Calculating BMI (Body Mass Index) 2. Measurement of Fitness Components – 1. Self-Assessment – Physical Health Risk, Mental Flexibility (Sit and Reach Test, Hip Bend and Health Risk Toe Touch); 2. Measurement of Fitness Components – Flexibility Strength (Sit-ups, Leg-raise for Minimal (Sit and Reach Test); Strength (Leg-raise for Strength); Minimal Strength); Cardiovascular Endurance (Run Cardiovascular Endurance (One-mile Run, and Walk Test); Muscular Endurance (Sit-ups) Physical Efficiency Test, Harvard step Test); Muscular Endurance (Bench Jumps, Sit-ups) 3. Preparation of Exercise Schedules for Aerobics and 3. Self-Evaluation – Personal Health and Well- Fitness Being 4. Calculation of BMI (Body Mass Index) and Waist-Hip 4. Developing Activity Index and Evaluation of Ratio Fitness Category 5. Exercise Schedules – Aerobics, Fitness and 5. Demonstration of Yogasana (Any Five Asanas) and Weight Management Aerobics 6. Selection and Application of Music in Aerobic 6. Visit to a Gym, Introduction to Equipments and Fitness Programme Preparation of a Report 7. Yoga (Any Five Asanas) 8. Gym Management – Costing, Balance Sheets, Promotional PlansPART-C : INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (25 Marks) PART C: INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (25 Marks) 1. Written Test (10 marks) 2. Attendance (5 marks) 211
  • 212. 3. Project / Assignment (10 marks) REFERENCES1. Department of Physical Education and Sports Sciences, University of Delhi (2007), Draft Resource Material – Fitness, Aerobics and Gym-Operations.2. Koley, Shyamal (2007), Exercise Physiology – A Basic Approach (New Delhi : Friends Publications).3. Sharkey, B. J. (2002), Fitness and Health 5th ed. (U.K., Human Kinetics).4. Powers, Scott K.; and Dodd, Stephen L. (1999), Total Fitness – Exercise, Nutrition and Wellness 2nd ed. (USA : Allyn and Bacon).5. ACSM’S (1998), ACSM Fitness Book (U.K., Human Kinetics).6. Bharihoke, Sunil (1998), The Gym Management (New Delhi : Khel Sahitya Kendra).7. Girdano, Daniel A.; Everly, George S.; and Dusek, Dorothy E. (1997), Controlling Stress and Tension – A Holistic Approach 5th ed. (USA : Allyn and Bacon).8. Anspaugh, David J.; Hamrick, Michael H.; and Rosato, Frank D. (1994), Wellness – Concepts and Applications 2nd ed. (Mosby Year Book, Inc.).9. Hoeger, W. W. K. & Hoeger, S.A. (1990), Fitness and Wellness (Colorado : Morton Publishing Company).10. Wiliams, Melvin H. (1990), Lifetime Fitness and Wellness – A Personal Choice 2nd ed. (USA : Wm. C. Brown Publishers). 2.7.1.2 Colleges Offering the Course Since 2007-08 1. Miranda House 212
  • 213. 2. St. Stephens College 3. Ramjas College 4. Daulat Ram College 5. SGTB Khalsa College 6. Janki Devi Memorial College 7. Satyavati College (Evening) 8. Jesus and Mary College Colleges Offering the Course from 2008-09 9. Hansraj College 10. Kamla Nehru College 11. Kirorimal College 12. Lakshmibai College 13. Ram Lal Anand College (Eve.) 14. Shivaji College 15. Shyama Prasad Mukherjee College 2.7.1.3 Draft Resource Material – Available in the Department Resource Material has been developed for Application Course through the six- workshops conducted for Teachers of Physical education from various colleges of University. The Resource material development was not only an academic activity but, also served as intellectual development Programme for all participants, who volunteered to take part in the workshops. (It is available from the Department on Request) 2.7.2 Discipline Course – Physical Education 2.7.2.1 Course of StudyPREAMBLETHE RATIONALE, AIM AND OBJECTIVES, OFFER OF THE COURSETHE COURSES • Discipline Course : Physical Education (Paper-I, II, III) o Paper-I : Introduction to Physical Education (Introduction, History and Physical Fitness) o Paper-II : Foundations of Physical Education (Health Edu. ,Anatomy, Physiology & Sports Medicine) o Paper-III : Professional Integration in Physical Education (Sports Psychology, Administration and Management) • Guidelines for Paper-Setter and ExaminersPREAMBLETHE RATIONALE Is the theme of broad basing Physical Education and Sports Education in University of Delhito : (a) Equip the students with the knowledge, techniques and qualification required to take-up a career inphysical education and sports; (b) Enable a student to acquire basic intellectual thinking and knowledge ofphysical education and sports in relevance to other disciplines, while providing flexibility of choices andintegrity of academic pursuits; (c) Provide for opportunities to pursue postgraduate studies in physicaleducation and sports, in continuation to the knowledge gained at Undergraduate Level; and (d) Enhancethe professional outlook by improving the likelihood of quality intake in the professional courses atpostgraduate level from amongst the people who already have educational experiences in physicaleducation and sports. It aims to ensure opportunities for : (1) Academic endeavor and career-orientation 213
  • 214. to students at large; (2) Sports Education for students having background of physical education at school levelto study the area in an active and reflective manner within mainstream courses (e.g. B.A. Programme.); (3)Inclusion of Physical Education as a Discipline Course and as Application Course(s) in Restructured B.A.Programme appropriately; and (4) Postgraduate level studies in the related area of interests pursued atundergraduate level.AIM AND OBJECTIVESIt identifies and sets out a coordinated, planned and comprehensive approach to address the issuessurrounding Physical Education as : (a) Discipline Course; (b) Job-oriented Application Courses at under-graduate level; and (c) To identify the link courses at post-graduate level. The objectives of the above-identified aim are :• To impart physical education and sports as an integral part of the curriculum in educational institutions as proclaimed by the current National Policies on Education and Sports and to inculcate an understanding about the need and relevance of physical education as a discipline in the present day context.• To function as a continuum between plus two level and higher education, while making the students aware of the latest trends in physical education, fitness and its implication on our general lifestyle through correlated classroom learning with physical activities thus developing body-mind coordination.• To cater the need of academic and professional leadership while equipping the youth with the technical skills of the area to enhance their potential and providing quality service to the masses.• To enhance the quality input for professional teacher training institutes and other functionaries in the field of physical education and sports.• To provide open ended choices for taking up careers in physical education and sports and to provide trained leadership in various upcoming careers such as fitness & activity management, media & marketing etc.• To create awareness among the masses about the active & reflective areas of physical education and sports.• To pursue higher studies in the field of physical education namely post graduation, M. Phil., Ph.D. and further research.OFFER OF THE COURSEAs per the ordinance of B.A. restructured programme.THE COURSE : DISCIPLINE COURSE : PHYSICAL EDUCATION (Paper-I, Paper-II, Paper-III)Education aims at the wholesome development of an individual, of which, physical education has becomean integral part. Learning by doing is an indivisible part of the entire process in the development ofphysical, social, psychological and moral aspects of a personality. Through the pursuit of correctmovements, an enhancement in motor abilities takes place leading to the creation of a healthier society.Physical education considers body as the media/tool to educate the mind, thus, encouraging the all rounddevelopment of an individual’s personality.Today, physical education is taught in most of the schools at the 10 + 2 level. A large number ofuniversities offer physical education at the undergraduate and postgraduate levels. However, the absenceof the same in the University of Delhi disillusions students who have studied the subject at the seniorsecondary level and are keen to pursue it at the undergraduate level. As physical education is also on theconcurrent list of the Indian Constitution, it is imperative that University of Delhi, being a central university,offers it at the undergraduate level.It is therefore proposed that physical education be introduced in the B.A. Programme. Physical Educationas the Discipline Course will also act as a foundation for students who are interested in the development ofa wholesome personality as also for those students who are seeking to pursue postgraduate studies inphysical education. The Discipline Course of Physical Education shall equip the students with basicunderstanding of meaning, aims and interdisciplinary approaches; historical aspects, components ofphysical fitness, health education, anatomy & physiology, and sports medicine. The paper also offersunderstanding in the area of sports psychology and administration & management of physical education. 214
  • 215. The discipline course also offers practical learning in a wide range of activity learning, rules & regulation ofthe sports & games, organization and reporting of events.SYLLABIDISCIPLINE COURSE : PHYSICAL EDUCATION⇒ Paper-I : Introduction to Physical Education (Introduction, History and Physical Fitness)⇒ Paper-II : Foundations of Physical Education (Health Education, Anatomy, Physiology and Sports Medicine)⇒ Paper-III : Professional Integration in Physical Education (Sports Psychology, Administration and Management)GUIDELINES FOR PAPER-SETTER AND EXAMINERS(Discipline Course : Paper-I, Paper-II & Paper-III)Part – A : Theory (50 Marks) : The examiner is required to set nine questions out of the theory syllabusequally distributed while covering all the contents of syllabus. The question-paper setting may include fivedescriptive, two objective type and two short notes. The candidate shall be given choice to attempt anythree descriptive, one objective and one short notes. All questions shall carry equal marks i.e. 10 marks.Out of 10 marks for each question, the assessment of the answers to each question should considerknowledge part for three marks, understanding part for three marks, and application part for four marks.However, it shall not apply on objective type of questions.Part – B : Practical (25 Marks) : The examiner is required to conduct practical examination and assessthe candidates on the components of : (i) proficiency in skill learnt; (ii) application of skill learnt; (iii) recordbook of practicals undertaken; (iv) personal and professional grooming, knowledge and presentation skills;and (v) viva-voce. Each examiner is required to give a minimum of 15 to 20 minutes to a candidate toprovide enough opportunity for presenting his / her performance, proficiency and presentation in the listedareas of practical examination. Awards of the practical examination should be duly filled in the proforma /award sheet (specified for the purpose).Part – C : Internal Assessment (25 Marks)As per University Ordinances. 2.7.2.2 Colleges Offering the Course from 2008-09 1. Miranda HouseDISCIPLINE COURSE : PHYSICAL EDUCATIONPAPER-I : INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL EDUCATION (Introduction, History and Physical Fitness) 215
  • 216. THEORY (M.M. : 50)Introduction o Definition, Need and Scope of Physical Education o Aim, Objectives and Principles of Physical Education o Physical Education in relation to Arts and Science Discipline - Anatomy, Physiology, Kinesiology, Biomechanics, Psychology, Sociology, Anthropology, Philosophy, Pedagogy etc.History o A Brief Overview of Physical Education in the Historical Perspectives. o Development of Physical Education in India, Greece and Rome o Promotion of Physical Education and Sports : Schemes, Awards and Honours, Awardees, Trophies/Cups and Eminent Sports Persons o Olympic Movement : Ancient Olympics, Modern Olympics, Objectives of Olympics, Olympic Motto, Flag, Emblem, Torch, Oath and Charter, International Olympic Committee and Indian Olympic Association, Performance of India at Olympic GamesPhysical Fitness o Meaning, Definition, Need and Importance of Physical Fitness o Components of Physical Fitness, General and Specific Fitness o Principles, Means and Methods to Develop Physical Fitness o Diet and Nutrition o Posture : Good Posture, Factors Causing Postural Deformities, Remedial Measures for Postural Deformities (Kyphosis, Scoliosis, Lordosis, Knock Knees, Bow Legs, Flat Foot) o Obesity o Rest and SleepPRACTICAL (M.M. : 25) o Track & Field : Techniques / Skills and Records (Track Events) o Fundamental Skills, Rules and Regulations of any one of the following Games : Basketball, Handball, Badminton, Hockey, Judo, Kho-Kho, Aquatics, Boxing o Development of Physical Fitness through Calisthenics / Aerobics / Circuit-Training / Weight-Training o Yoga (Suryanamaskar)INTERNAL ASSESSMENT (M.M. : 25) 216
  • 217. BOOKS AND READINGSTHEORY• Bucher, Charles A. and Wluest, D.A. (1987), Foundations of Physical Education and Sports (St. Louis : Times Mirror Mosby).• Defence Review (2001), India’s Highest Sports Award and Those Who Won Them.• Gupta, K. and Gupta, L.C. (1986), Food and Nutrition2nd ed. (New Delhi : Jaypee Brothers Medical Publisher).• Harold, M. Barrow (1971), Man and His Movement : Principles of His Physical Education (Philadelphia : Lea & Febiger).• Kamlesh, M. L. and Singh, M. K. (2006), Physical Education (Naveen Publications).• Kansal, D. K. (1998), Test and Measurement in Sports and Physical Education (New Delhi : D.V.S. Publications).• Lau, S. K. (1999), Great Indian Players (New Delhi : Sports Publications).• Sharma, N.P. (2005), Sharirik Shiksha Ke Sidhant Aur Itihas (New Delhi : Khel Sahitya Kendra).• Uppal, A. K. (2004), Fitness and Wellness (New Delhi, Friends Publications).• Uppal, A. K. and Gautam, G. P. (2000), Physical Education and Health (New Delhi : Friends Publications).• Van Delen, D.B. and Bennett, B.L. (1986), A World History of Physical Education (N.J. Prentice Hall Inc.: Englewood Cliffs).PRACTICAL• Abraham, C.C. (1989), Basketball for Men and Women (Madras :Y.M.C.A. Publishing House).• Balyan, D. (2006), Physical Training, PT & Drill (New Delhi : Khel Sahitya Kendra).• Brown, E. (1995), Better Badminton (London : Faber & Faber).• Debort, J. Monneth (1987), Modern Track and Field (N.J. Prentice Hall Inc. : Englewood Cliffs).• Dowony, J.C. (1990), Better Badminton for All (Great Britain : Palham Books Ltd.).• Ewen Harry (1972), Your Book of Judo (London : Faber and Faber).• Jerry, V. Krause (1999), Skills and Drills in Basketball (Leisure Press).• Mohan, V.M. (1977), Athletics for Beginners (New Delhi : Metropoliton Books).• Roberson, Richard and Olson, Herbert (1990), Beginning Handball (California : Wadso H. Company Inc. Belmont).• Rowland, B.J. (1970), Handball – A Complete Guide (London : Faber and Faber Ltd.).• Singh, Gian and Walia, Kuku (1979), Learn Hockey This Way (New Delhi : International Hockey Institute).• Thani, Yograj (2002), Coaching Successfully Hockey (New Delhi : Sports Publications).• Thomas, Inch (2005), Play and Learn Boxing (New Delhi : Khel Sahitya Kendra).• Uyenishi, S. K. (1991), The Text Book of Judo, Jujitsu (London : Athletic Pub. Ltd.).• Yadav, Yogesh (1968), Kho-Kho (Maharashtra Kho-Kho Association).• Refer various sites of sports / games federations at national / international level. 217
  • 218. PAPER-II : FOUNDATIONS OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION(Health Education, Anatomy, Physiology and Sports Medicine)THEORY (M.M. : 50)Health Educationo Meaning and Concept of Health and Health Educationo Importance of Health and Principles of Health and Health Educationo Role of Different Agencies in Promoting Health (WHO, UNICEF, Local Bodies)o Personal HygieneAnatomy and Physiologyo Concept, Need and Importance of Anatomy and Physiology in Physical Educationo Definition and Description of Cell, Tissue, Organ and Systemo Introduction to and Function of Skeletal System, Muscular System, Circulatory System, Respiratory System, Digestive System, Excretory System, Nervous System and Endocrine Systemo Effect of Exercise on Skeletal System, Muscular System, Circulatory System, Respiratory System, Digestive System, Excretory System, Nervous System and Endocrine System, Warming-up, Conditioning, Cooling-down, Fatigue, Stitch, Cramp, Oxygen Debt, Second Wind, Vital Capacity, Stroke Volume and Temperature Regulation, Lactate Threshold & VO2 max.Sports Medicine (Athletic Care)o Concept and Role of Sports Medicine & Athletic Careo Prevention and Management of Injuries : Factors causing injuries and general principles regarding prevention of injurieso Common Sports Injuries : Sprain, Strain, Abrasion, Laceration, Haematoma, Fracture, Dislocationo First-Aid of Sports Injurieso Ergogenic Aidso Aim and Objectives of Rehabilitation, Therapeutic Modalities, Muscle Strengthening through Active and Passive ExercisesPRACTICAL (M.M. : 25)o Track & Field (Jumping Events) : History, Techniques/Skills and Recordso History, Fundamental Skills, Rules and Regulations of any one of the following games : Football, Softball, Table-Tennis, Gymnastics, Wrestling, Volleyball, Korfballo Yoga : Any five asanas out of the following : Karanpeedasana, Padmasana, Dhanurasana, Sarvangasana, Paschimottanasana, Chakrasana, Halasana, Matsyasana, Ardhmatsyendrasana, Usthrasana, Mayurasana, Shirshasana, VajrasanaINTERNAL ASSESSMENT (M.M. : 25) BOOKS AND READINGSTHEORY• Beotra, Alka (2001-02), Drug Education Handbook on Drug Abuse in Sports (Mumbai : Applied Nutrition Sciences).• Jain, Jawahar (2004), Khel Dawaon Ka (New Delhi : Delhi University Press).• Pande, P. K. (1987), Outline of Sports Medicine (New Delhi : Jaypee Brothers).• Roy, Steven and Richard, Irvin (1983), Sports Medicine (N.J. : Englewood Cliff.).• Sharma, N.P. (2005), Sharir Rachna Tatha Sharir Kriya Vigyan (New Delhi : Khel Sahitya Kendra).PRACTICAL• Debort, J. Monneth (1987), Modern Track and Field (N.J. Prentice Hall Inc. : Englewood Cliffs).• Mohan, V.M. (1977), Athletics for Beginners (New Delhi : Metropoliton Books). 218
  • 219. • Refer various sites of sports / games federations at national / international level. 219
  • 220. PAPER-III : PROFESSIONAL INTEGRATION IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION (Sports Psychology, Administration and Management of Physical Education)THEORY (M.M. : 50)Sports Psychologyo Definition, Scope and Importance of Sports Psychologyo Fundamentals of Growth and Development (Infancy, Childhood, Adolescence, Adulthood)o Personality : Meaning of Personality, Personality, Factors Affecting Personality, Development of Personality and Sportso Learning : Concept and Principles of Learning, Types of Learning, Learning Curve, Transfer of Training and Sportso Motivation : Concept of Motivation, Types of Motivation, Role of Motivation, Concepts of Incentive, Achievement, Motivation and Sportso Concepts of Positive Thinking, Attitudes, Emotion, Anxiety and Stress Management in SportsAdministration and Management of Physical Educationo Concept and Scope of Planning, Organization, Administration and Management with reference to Physical Educationo Lay-out and Supervision of Physical Education Facilitieso Drawing of Fixtures, Organization of Intramurals / Extra-murals and other Sports Events (Seminar, Clinic, Talk etc.)o Office Management and Budgeting : Maintenance of Records and Accountso Use of Audio-Visual Aids in Physical Educationo Role of Media and Public Relations in Physical Educationo Careers in Fitness, Health, Physical Education and SportsPRACTICAL (M.M. : 25)o Track & Field (Throwing Events) : History, Techniques/Skills and Recordso History, Fundamental Skills, Rules and Regulations of any one of the following games : Cricket, Netball, Squash, Archery, Kabaddi, Chess, Shootingo Organization and Reporting of an EventINTERNAL ASSESSMENT (M.M. : 25) BOOKS AND READINGSTHEORY • Bucher, Charles A. and Krotee, M. L. (1993), Management of Physical Education & Athletic Programs 10th ed. (St. Louis : Mosby Year Book). • Chakraborty, Samiran (2002), Sports Management (Delhi : Khel Sahitya Kendra) • International Olympic Committee (1986), Sports Leadership Course (Lausanne, Switzerland). • Kaushik, Seema and Shaw, Dhananjoy (2000), Sharirik Shiksha Mein Paath Niyojan Va Shikshan Paddhhati Ke Siddhhant (New Delhi : Friends Publications). • Sandhu, Kiran (1993), Sports Dynamics–Psychology, Sociology and Management (Delhi : Galgotia Publishers). • Sandhu, Kiran (2006), Trends and Developments in Professional Preparation in Physical Education (New Delhi : Friends Publication). • Shaw, Dhananjoy and Kaushik, Seema (2001), Lesson-Planning, Teaching Methods and Class- Management in Physical Education (New Delhi : Khel Sahitya Kendra).PRACTICAL • Debort, J. Monneth (1987), Modern Track and Field (N.J. Prentice Hall Inc. : Englewood Cliffs). • Mohan, V.M. (1977), Athletics for Beginners (New Delhi : Metropoliton Books). 220
  • 221. • Refer various sites of sports / games federations at national / international level.3. PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES3.1 One Day Workshop on “Management of Sports Injuries” - Report & Photo Features DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND SPORTS SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF DELHI A REPORT ONE DAY WORKSHOP ON ‘MANAGEMENT OF SPORTS INJURIES’ At Conference Hall, University of Delhi MAY 23, 2007 221
  • 222. INDIRA GANDHI INSTITUTE OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION & SPORTS SCIENCES Block-B, Vikaspuri, NEWDELHI-110018 TEL.: Off: 64558385; 25593497; Mob; 9818022788; Res: 25748802 E-MAIL: kiran_sandhu36@yahoo.co.inDR. (Mrs.) KIRAN SANDHU Head A ONE DAY WORK SHOP ON ‘MANAGEMENT OF SPORTS INJURIES’ On Wednesday, May 23, 2007 At Conference Centre, University of Delhi, Delhi-110 007 INAUGURATION BY Prof.S K Tondon, Pro Vice Chancellor, University of Delhi RESOURCE PERSON *Ms. Kate Grafton, Principal Lecturer, International Development Unit and Physiotherapist, Faculty of Health and Wellbeing, Sheffield Hallam University, U.K. **Dr. P.S.M. Chandran, Director, Sports Medicine, Sports Authority of India ***Dr. J.L. Jain, Sr. Physician, WUHS, University of Delhi SESSION – I : SPORTS INJURY MANAGEMENT - WHAT, WHERE AND WHY?* SESSION – II : PREVENTION IS BEST – HOW TO AVOID INJURY?* SESSION – III : HOW GOOD IS YOUR TRUNK CONTROL?* : (DO IT YOURSELF & LEARN – A PRACTICUM) Informative Talks I : MEDICAL COVER 2010 COMMONWEALTH** II : ERGOGENIC AIDS IN SPORTS*** PROGRAMME 8:30 a.m. : Registration over a Cup of Tea 9:30 a.m. : Registration Closes 9:45-10:30 a.m. : Inauguration 10:30-11:30 a.m. : Session – I* 11:30 a.m. : Drinks 12:00 -1:00 p.m. : Session – II* 1:00 - 1:30 p.m. : Informative Talk – I ** 1:30 p.m. : Lunch 2:30 p.m. : Informative Talk – ii *** 3:00-4:30 p.m. : Session – III* 4:30 p.m. : Closing & Tea Dr. N. P. Sharma, Coordinator 222
  • 223. CONTENTSProgramme of Workshop1. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS2. RESOURCE PERSONS3. REGISTRATION4. PROCEEDINGS AND WORK PERFORMED INAUGURAL SESSION WORKSHOP SCIENTIFIC SESSIONS* INFORMATIVE TALKS- (Talk-1** & Talk-2 ***) VALEDICTORY SESSION5. LEARNING OUT COMES6. WORKSHOP SUPPORT: ACADEMIC AND PRACTICAL LEARNING7. CERTIFICATION8. HOSPITALITY9. APPENDICES APPENDIX-I : Delegates- Student, and Lecturers, Physical Education from Different Colleges of University of Delhi, Invited Resource Persons and Visitors & Members of Organization Desk–cum– Delegates APPENDIX-II : Support Material Distributed APPENDIX-III: Workshop Assessment Performa APPENDIX-IV: Copy of the Certificates APPENDIX-V : Invitation Card and Post Material Appendix-VI : Abstract of the Report Appendix-VII: Media Outlook. APPENDIX-VIII: Organizing DeskBack-cover : Revisiting the Workshop -A Photo Gallery 223
  • 224. A REPORT: WORKSHOP ON ‘MANAGEMENT OF SPORTS INJURIES’ACKNOWLEDGEMENTSThe workshop organization acknowledges the support received from various source s of support especiallyChairperson of Unassigned Grants Committee, University of Delhi for a special sanction of grant for theworkshop organization; & estate office for providing venue for the conference. Ii also recognizes thesupport received from DUSC, IGIPESS, The British School, New Delhi; British Council, New Delhi; PepsiDrinks; and Bhagwati Constructions, New Delhi. Special Thanks to the Members of fraternity who helped onthe organization Desk of the Work Shop.One day workshop on ‘Management of Sports Injuries’ was organized by the Department of PhysicalEducation and Sports Sciences on May 23, 2007 at Conference Centre, University of Delhi.Chief Guest : Prof. S.K. Tandon, Pro–Vice Chancellor, University of DelhiPresiding officer : Prof. Prahlad Ghosh, Former Dean, FIAS, University of DelhiConvener : Dr. Kiran Sandhu, Head, Department of Physical Education and Sports Sciences, University of DelhiCoordinator : Dr. N.P. Sharma, Reader, IGIPESSResource Persons : *Ms. Kate Grafton, Principal Lecturer, International Development Unit and Physiotherapist, Faculty of Health and Wellbeing, Sheffield Hallam University, U.K. **Dr. P.S.M. Chandran, Director, Sports Medicine, Sports Authority of India ***Dr. J.L. Jain, Sr. Physician, WUHS, University of DelhiREGISTRATIONThe workshop was primarily organised for students and teachers of University of Delhi, it was wellattended, and registration break-up of attendance in the work shop is as per the following details: Students : List attached (Appendix-I) Lecturers Physical Education : (Appendix-I) Invited Resource Persons/Delegates : (Appendix-I) Organising Desk-cum-Delegates : (Appendix-I) Medical Personnel : Dr. J.L. Jain, Dr.. Chandran, Dr. Vijay Dignitaries/ Distinguished Guests : Prof. P. Ghosh (Former Dean, Faculty of Inter-Disciplinary and Applied Sciences) Prof. Rajiva Verma (Chairman, B.A. Programme Committee) Prof. Surender Nath (Dean, Faculty of Sciences) Prof. U.S. Sharma (Former Dean, Faculty of Education) Prof. N.K. Chadha (Head, Department of Adult, Continuing Education and Extension) Dr. Shashwati Mazumdar (Head, Department of Germanic and Romance Studies) Dr. Pratibha Jolly (Principal, Miranda House); Dr. Savitri Singh (Principal, Acharya Narender Dev College) Dr. Jaswinder Singh, (Principal Khalsa college) Dr. D. K. Kansal (Principal, IGIPESS) Dr. J.S. Naruka (Director, Delhi University Sports Council) Sh. Umesh Kumar (Chairman, IGIPESS) Ms. Asha Aggarwal (Arjuna Awardee, Deputy Director, Directorate of Education, Delhi) Ms. Mona Shiplay (Head, Scholarship, British Council, New Delhi) 224
  • 225. Dr. Kalpna Sharma, (Principal, Noida College of Physical EducationPROCEEDINGS AND WORK PERFORMED:INAUGURAL SESSIONDr. Kiran Sandhu, Head of The Department, Physical Education & Sports Sciences, University of Delhi andConvener of the workshop welcomed everyone and shared the progress made by the Department ofPhysical Education and Sports Sciences, which is a recent initiative of University of Delhi. In a briefpresentation she also shared the possibilities to be explored in near future for the welfare of the studentsundertaking programms of Physical Education & Sports. She acknowledged the University of Delhi forpermitting to start Ph.D. Programme in Physical Education. She expressed gratitude to the B.A. Programmecommittee of University of Delhi for recommending the proposal of Physical Education to University ofDelhi. She also appreciated the colleges and Principals who have taken initiatives to introduce PhysicalEducation in B.A. Programme in their colleges w.e.f.July, 2007. Dr. Sandhu elaborated that this workshopwill be one of the many which have been planned by the department for faculty and students’ enrichment.She also shared her vision of the possibility of student exchange programmes with Universities in developedcountries for learning and exposure to the advance techniques, academics and ongoing research in sportssand physical education in higher education. She also informed that the British Council, New Delhi hasagreed in principal to support few resource persons for training teachers of University of Delhi in theidentified areas in Train the Trainer Modules.Prof. S.K. Tandon, Pro Vice Chancellor of University of Delhi and the Chief Guest of the workshop inhis inaugural address, said that sports is a symbol of action and movement and that is reflective in life;much more should have been done by the University of Delhi in the field of Physical Education for its beingan important field of education. Particularly in the context of Commonwealth Games-2010, it is a veryopportune time to perhaps make sports a part of community activity. He further stated that, sports knitcommunities together and as a nation it is time we realize its importance. Prof. Tandon assured all thepossible support towards journey of becoming successful in building a very effective programme of physicaleducation and sports in the University of Delhi. He said the theme of the work shop is the need of the day,and is just a beginning; The Department has a long way to walk for progress. He agreed that relevantlearning will take place today in the area of management of sports injuries which needs great attention byall concerned, especially understanding it with cross-cultural perspectives. At all costs, young lives need tobe saved and for teacher and students, gained knowledge will go a long way. He thanked Dr. Kate Graftonand University of Sheffilied Hallam UK, for accepting to conduct the workshop.Prof. Prahlad C. Ghosh represented the Dean of the Faculty of Interdisciplinary & Applied Sciences, andshared that he being the first Dean of the Department when the Department was made functional notedthat people from the area of Physical education and Sports is an eager community to progress, they wantto move ahead and that is a healthy sign for making progress, he wished success to the workshop and itsparticipants.Ms. Kate Grafton, presented an overview of schedule of teaching-learning to happen during theworkshop, she also shared information about University of Sheffield.Dr. D.K. Kansal, acknowledged contribution of all and thanked every one, he also shared his vision aboutthe need for all to be physically literate.Dr. J.S. Naruka presented a winding up note for the inaugural session and said that Physical Educationand Sports were like mother and child and should not be separated, for it to grow in a unified manner.WORKSHOP SCIENTIFIC SESSIONS:SESSION-I* : SPORT INJURY MANAGEMENT – WHAT? WHERE? WHY? Chairperson : Dr. Pratibha Jolly, Principal, Miranda House Co-Chairperson : Dr. N.P. Sharma, Reader, IGIPESS The workshop explored the following areas for building the foundation: Introducition made the base and three questions were discussed - What? Where? Why? Key considerations in setting up an injury management service at a sporting event were explored. Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation Provisions in SHU were explained in relevance to the present workshop. 225
  • 226. The session provided an understanding on setting up of injury management services according to the level and nature of sports events. In an interactive mode, the participants worked in groups to identify the major dimensions for setting injury management service on spot in sporting events. It challenged thinking process of the participants and presentations were made by the group representatives for reviewing the assembled areas.SESSION-II* : PREVENTION IS BEST - HOW DO YOU AVOID INJURY? Chairperson : Dr. D.K. Kansal, Principal, IGIPESS Co-Chairperson : Dr. N.P. Sharma, Reader, IGIPESS The workshop explored the following questions: Fit for sport or sport for fitness? Is an injury Overuse or under use? Risk assessment - what should it include?The speaker gave the participants an understanding of whether Injury should be prevented or reduced,about how important it is to understand whether injury is caused due to Intrinsic or extrinsic factors, thedifference between Coaching vs. training and prevention of injury through Movement control was alsoelaborated.Dr. Kate Grafton also said that sports injuries happen through sudden or persistent stress on a particularpart of the body with which the body cannot cope and also because of damage to the body tissues due tolong term stresses placed on particular body parts. Elaborating on the strategies, Dr. Grafton said thatCoaching for movement control should be given priority which would address issues of quality not quantity;correction of the wrong movement; how to keep focused on the positive, and understand how we learn,give training for the movement and not the muscle; and finally emphasis has to be on Coaching the athleteand not the drill. Children under 14 years old are at an optimal age for movement training. INFORMATIVE TALK –1 : MEDICAL COVER IN 2010** Chairperson : Dr. D.K. Kansal, Principal, IGIPESS Co-Chairperson : Dr. N.P. Sharma, Reader, IGIPESSIn the second session of the day, Dr. P.S.M. Chandran, Director (Sports Medicine), Sports Authority ofIndia, presented an informative talk on “Commonwealth Games 2010 : Challenges to SportsMedicine : Medical Cover for Sports Meets”. Dr. Chandran elaborated upon the Medical cover at thestadium for athletes, spectators and VIP’s, Medical cover at the hotels/ Games Village which will have adispensary and a mini hospital with on call specialists respectively, and the Medical Cover for Road Raceswith mobile medical teams and first aid posts.The medical arrangements will depend upon the type of sport and injury pattern. Referral hospitals with allfacilities for surgery and ICU’s are also being identified, with special cover being extended to Boxers andMarathon runners. Dr. Chandran said that provision for preventive medical examination, with the presenceof medical personnel on duty during sports meets are also in the offing.The Medical Cover during Commonwealth Games - 2010 will be undertaken by a medical committee, withthe medical controller controlling all operations. He talked in detail about the role and duties of MedicalController. INFORMATIVE TALK–2 : ERGOGENIC-AIDS AND SPORTS*** Chairperson : Dr. R.S. Mann, Reader, Shaheed Bhagat Singh College Co-Chairperson : Dr. J.P. Sharma, Reader, IGIPESSAfter a short lunch break, the session III was convened for a presentation by Dr. Jawahar Lal Jain, SeniorPhysician, WUHS, University of Delhi on Ergogenic Aids and Sports. An in depth and informative lectureon the use of performance enhancing drugs, and other aids was delivered by him. He said that educationand awareness about the problem of doping / use of supplements needed to be imparted to the athletes,coaches, officials, parents and the government on war footing. At this point of time, there is dire need fora sports nutritionist, a full time doctor, a sports psychologist and a physiotherapist accompanying Indianteams to reach fullest potential in international competitions. 226
  • 227. SESSION-III* : How Good is your Trunk Control? (A Practicum Session-Learning by Doing) Chairperson : Sh. Clement Raj Kumar, Reader, St. Stephen’s College Co-Chairperson : Sh. Mukesh Kumar Kohli, Reader, Ram Lal Anand College Session Coordinator : Dr. Pardeep Kumar, Reader, IGIPESS Sh. Nama Ashish , Sr, Lecturer, Moti Lal Nehru College The workshop explored the following theoretical and practical aspects of : Core stabilization and how to improve it. Movement control as the key to injury prevention, rehabilitation; and peak sport performance. Effect of lack of Movement / Dynamic Control are : o Pain / reflex inhibition o Restricted motion o Reduction in muscle endurance / increase in fatigue o Dysfunction in adjacent joints o Problems with muscle control o Proprioceptive deficitDr. Grafton also explained the concepts behind Muscle imbalance, Stability vs. instability, Motor control andCore stability. Local muscle and global muscle systems were dealt with at length with the help of musclediagrams.Comparisons between local postural stabilizers and global dynamic stabilizers with reference to anatomical /biomechanical muscle differences were drawn as also the differences between the tonic and of basicmuscle fiber. Methods of retraining Dynamic Control were touched upon, which are identification of theunderlying dysfunctional movement patterns, identification of a shortened / tight muscle, application ofanatomy and principles of stretching, and identification of a under active or delayed in activation muscle.The learning was clubbed with a practical session using Swiss/Gym balls and Pilates exercises conducted bythe resource person, which was very informative and had practical application and majority of participantstook part in it. The Principles of Pilates were enumerated as: Concentration Control Centre - central trunk muscles ‘The Power House’ Fluidity - no jerky movements Precision - quality Breath - control of breath to control of movement Imagination Intuition Integration - of movement and good postureFurther readings on Core Stabilization and a Self assessment questionnaire for movementcontrol were also given to the participants by Dr. Grafton.VALEDICTORY SESSIONMr. Clement Rajkumar, the president of Delhi University Teachers association of Physical Education,presented the utility of such workshop and application of the learnt skill in the workshop on Management ofSports injuries for the teachers and students both, he said that not only such knowledge is good for sports,but it is equally necessary for a healthy and fit life to be lead even in post active period of sports.Therefore, it is life long requirement to practice the learnt skills and apply the knowledge in real life. Dr.Grafton was thanked by Mr. Mukesh Kohli, a senior Faculty of Physical Education, Ram Lal Anand Collegeon behalf of the Department of Physical Education and Sports Sciences and everyone present, for anenriching and enlightening experience in the field of Sports Physiotherapy and Management of SportsInjuries.LEARNING OUT COMESThe participants of the workshop were eminently satisfied with the workshop on sports injuries and were ofthe opinion that many more such ventures would prove to be of benefit to the teaching and studentcommunity of physical education in providing and receiving quality education. 227
  • 228. It is assessed that after the workshop the participants will be able to: 1. Carry out & Supervise the Management of Sports Injuries with: various point of view including Role of Sports Physiotherapy; Cross-cultural perspectives; Extension of existing knowledge, Building–up of foundations, Role of trunk in movement, and sports performance. 2. Manage the Career and Professional Readiness by: a. Establishing an Injury Management Facility Centre on sports sites b. Developing Business Philosophy and its application c. Offering Preventive Measures and strategies 3. Work on live models while applying hand-on knowledge in: a. Identification of Muscles (Primary and Secondary) responsible for movement Function with special emphasis on Trunk-coupling, (prevention, fitness and maintenance) b. Demonstrations and supervision in exercises of skill, Swiss ball , and Pilates performed with Swiss balls and Floor/Mattress 4 Understand fully the concept of Medical-cover for international events, and relevance of ergogenic aids in sportsWORKSHOP SUPPORT: ACADEMIC AND PRACTICAL LEARNINGA) Academic Support: Material and Activities 1. The work shop bag was given to all the participants of the workshop. 2. The support material was provided in terms of hand outs of all the scientific sessions and informative talks. The material was in bound volume of 27 pages. (Appendix- II). 3. The display of the scientific books was organised on the theme of Management of Sports Injuries and its relevant areas of study. 4. Proceedings were tape recorded and are available for consultation in the office of Department of Physical Education & Sports Sciences at IGIPESS, Block-B Vikas Puri, New Delhi-110018. 5. List of resource and reference material suggested for further reading was also provided.B) Practical Session Support – Material and Activities 1. Mattresses were provided for practical training session 2. Swiss Balls were provided for learning exercises in the learning by doing sessionC) Feedback: Evaluation of Workshop was done through evaluation Performa (Appendix-III).CERTIFICATIONThe participants were also distributed certificates. A specimen copy is attached (Appendix-IV).HOSPITALITY Invitation cards were sent (Appendix-V) Morning Tea with snacks was served during registration from 8:30 to 9:30 a.m. Session Break Tea and Biscuits were served at 11:45 a.m. Lunch was served at 1:45 p.m. Cold Drinks and Lay Chips were served to all at 5:30 p.m.Special effort was made to provide conveyance arrangements etc to the resource persons in addition tonormal expected requirement.REPORT & MEDIAA report and abstract was prepared and sent out (Appendix-VI) as the handout and press releasethat has been reported in the media. (Appendix-VII)ORGANIZATION DESKMany a number of teachers of Colleges of University of Delhi, IGIPESS, and Research Scholars of theDepartment volunteered to support the organization of the Workshop. List of the Organizing Desk is inAppendix-VIII. (Dr. KIRAN SANDHU) Head of Department Physical education & Sports Sciences, 228
  • 229. University of Delhi Email: Kiran_sandhu36@yahoo.co.in Phone: 64558385; 9818022788; 28728802 OFF: IGIPESS, Block- B, Vikas Puri, New Delhi 110018 APPENDIX- I : Delegates- Presence in ONE DAY WORK SHOP on 23-05-07 Student, and Lecturers, Physical Education from Different Colleges of Univ of Delhi, Invited Resource Persons and Visitors and Members of Organization Desk–cum–Delegates S Students Physical Invitees/ Resource Visitors Research Organization Support StaffNo Education Persons scholars Desk cum- Lecturers Delegates1 Mr. Vikas Ms. Kuljeet Kaur Prof. P.C. Ghosh Mr. Vivek Mr. P. Dr. Kiran Sh. Gulshan Rawat Bhagi Samana Saroha Sandhu (Press)2 Mr. Akhil Dr. Kamlesh Ms. Kate Grafton Mr. Sujay Mr. Ajit Dr. N. P. Sharma Ms. Kiran V. Kumar Sharma John(Press Nair Chaudhary3 Ms. Rashmi Dr. Manmohan Dr. J. L. Jain Mr. Rakesh Mr. Surnder Mr. Clement Raj Ms .Sangeeta Kaur Thapliyal Kumar Kumar (Press) Bhandoria4 Ms. Mr. Clement Raj Dr. P. S. M. Mr. Mukesh Mr. Dr. J. P. Sharma Mr. Ganesh Kaushambi Kumar Chandran Thapliyal Dharmender Giri Tyagi (Press)5 Ms.Vidhata Mr.Mukesh Kohli Dr. Vijay Mr. Raman Mr. Vishnu Dr. Rajbir Mr. Ishwar Kaushal Parmar Parkash (Bal Bhawan)6 Ms. Rekha Ms. Seema V. Prof. Rajiva Verma Mr. Kunal Dr. Lalit Sharma Sh. Satish Gupta Singh (Caretaker)7 Mr. Mrs. Manjeet Dr. Nath Surender Mr. Varun Ms. Seema Mr. Inder Prabhakar Madan Nijhawan Kaushik Parveen8 Ms Shubhra Ms. Parveen Kaur Prof. U. S. Sharma Dr. M. M. S. Sh. Lala Kathuria Bedi DUSC9 Mr. Dinesh Ompati Chaudhary Prof. Shaswati Dr. DineshP. Sh. Banmau Rana Majumdar Sharma DUSC10 Ms. Jyoti Dr. Ashok Singh Prof. N. K. Chadha Dr. Amita Rana Mann11 Mr. Amit Ms. O. P. Padma Dr. Jolly Pratibha Dr. Anju Luthra Singh12 Ms. Kiran Mr. Mukesh Kohli Dr. Singh Jaswinder Dr Kavita Sharma13 Mr. Hari Dr. N. P. Sharma Dr. Singh Savithri Dr. Saryu Ruhela Om14 Mr. Naval Dr. Amita Rana Dr. D. K. Kansal Dr. Sunita Arora 229
  • 230. Kishor15 Mr. Ajay Dr. Sunita Arora Dr. Kalpana Dr. Pradeep Sharma Chikaara16 Ms. Anita Ms. Abha Jain Dr. J S Naruka Mr. Nama Ashish17 Ms. Babita Dr. Benu Gupta Mr. Umesh Kumar Dr. R. S. Mann18 Mr. Praveen Dr. Sheela kumari. Ms. Asha Dr. Suresh Lawrence Aggarwal Kumar Lau19 Mr. Prateek Ms. Rekha Kumari Ms. Mona Shipley Dr. Sheela K. Walia20 Mr. Manish Chakravarty Mr. Veer Singh Dr. Govil Savita Kumar Sk21 Mr. Mohit Ms. Pahuja Sh. Morris Tete Munesh Goel Meenakshi Chakravarthy22 Mr. Amit Mr. Raghbir Singh Ms. Seema Negi Mann Singh23 Ms. Sunit Shewta Suri Midha Ms. Sonia Gusain Shalini24 Ms. Neha Ms. Anjum Padyal Sharma25 Mr. Sunil Mr. Virender Singh Dutt jaggi26 Ms. Ekta Dr. Parmod Kumar Mehta Sethi27 Ms. Dr. Gauri Meenakshi chakravothy Tokas28 Mr. Amit Dr. Surender Singh29 Ms. Deepali Ms. Shweta Suri Midha30 Ms. Ishani Ms. Praveen Kaur Pahwa31 Ms. Tanya Ms. Manjeet Pandey Madan32 Ms. Cherry Dr. Pargat Singh Luthra33 Ms. Monica34 Poonam Goswami35 Asha Rana 230
  • 231. 231
  • 232. APPENDIX-II : Support Material Distributed (Copy Enclosed)APPENDIX-III : Workshop Assessment Performa - Trunk Control Self AssessmentMUSCLE RECRUITMENT TASK - COMMENT SIMPLE TASKS Transversus Abdominis – standing Transversus Abdominis – supine, Transversus Abdominis – 4 point kneeling Multifidus -step standing Multifidus - arm movements Saggital Plane leg slides & lifts (supine) Rotation control leg rolls outs (supine) Gluts Lateral leg lift (side lying) Gluts : hamstring dissociation (prone) Gluts : hamstring dissociation (hips flexed) COMBINATION TASKS 4 point kneeling limb movement control Trunk segmental roll-ups & roll downs Trunk control with lower limb movements GYM BALL CHALLENGES Sit on ball – good posture, spinal dissociation, no support Sit on ball – arm lifts, leg lifts, combination lifts Abdominal hold, back on floor, legs on ball Spinal extension, abdomen on ball, lift opp limbs Trunk control walk trunk out Roll ball up & down wall 232
  • 233. APPENDIX-IV : COPY OF THE CERTIFICATE 233
  • 234. APPENDIX-V : INVITATION CARD AND POST MATERIAL 234
  • 235. APPENDIX-VI: AN ABSTRACT OF THE REPORT: ‘WORKSHOP ON ‘MANAGEMENT OF SPORTS INJURIES’One day workshop on ‘Management of Sports Injuries’ was organized by the Department of Physical Education andSports Sciences on May 23, 2007at Conference Centre, University of Delhi.While inaugurating the workshop Prof. S.K. Tandon, Pro-Vice Chancellor, University of Delhi, said that It is just abeginning and University of Delhi has a long way to go in Physical Education & Sports. Such workshops are indeedthe professional need of the students and teachers to understand professional themes from local and cross-culturalperspectives.A well attended conference had the opportunity to interact with distinguished guests form university fraternity.Amongthe presents were Prof. P. Ghosh (Faculty of Inter-Disciplinary and Applied Sciences) presided over the inauguralsession. Prof. Rajiva Verma (Chairman, B.A. Programme Committee); Prof. Surender Nath (Dean, Faculty ofSciences); Prof. U.S. Sharma (Former Dean, Faculty of Education); Prof. N.K. Chadha (Head, Department of Adult,Continuing Education and Extension); Dr. Shashwati Mazumdar (Head, Department of Germanic and RomansStudies); Dr. Pratibha Jolly (Principal, Miranda House); Dr. Savitri Singh (Principal, Acharya Narender DevCollege), Dr. Jaswinder Singh (Principal Khalsa College); Prof. J.S. Naruka (Director, Delhi University SportsCouncil), Dr. D.K. Kansal (Principal, IGIPESS), Ms. Asha Aggarwal (Arjuna Awardee) and Ms. Mona Shiplay (Head,Scholarship of British Council) besides 125 delegates from the University of Delhi including teachers, research-scholars and students. Dr. N.P. Sharma from IGIPESS coordinated the workshop.Dr. Kiran Sandhu, Head of the Department of Physical Education and Sports Sciences of University of Delhi extendedwelcome and acknowleged University for allowing the Department to start registration to the Ph.D. Programme inphysical education, in addition to Physical Education as an Application and Discipline Course in B.A. Programmewith effect from July, 2007.Kate Graftan, Principal Lecturer, International Development Unit & Physiotherapist, Faculty of Health and WellBeing, Sheffield Hallam University, U.K. was the main resource person of the workshop.The three scientific-sessions workshop also had two informative talks. First session was focused on the “SportsInjuries – What? Where? Why?”, the second session discussed “Prevention Is Best – How Do You Avoid Injury” andthird session progressed with a practicum session on “How Good Is Your Trunk Control?” Delegates of the workshopexperienced practical training for trunk-control with Swiss ball (Gym) ball and Pilates exercises etc. The informativetalk “Medical Cover For 2010 – Commonwealth Games” was delivered by Prof. P.S.M. Chandran, Director, SportsMedicine, Sports Authority of India; and talk on “Ergogenic Aids and Sports” was delivered by Dr. J. L. Jain, SeniorPhysician, W.U.H.S. University of Delhi.In the valedictory session, Dr. Grafton was acknowledged for enriching the participants by co-Chairperson of thesession, Mr. Mukesh Kohli. The valedictory address was given by Mr. Clement Raj kumar, President of DelhiUniversity Physical Education Teachers’ Association. Dr. D.K. Kansal, Principal, IGIPESS proposed vote of thanks.The workshop was an enriching and enlightening experience for all the participants, as it included thought-provokingdiscussions, interactions and practical learning. After the workshop it is assessed that participants will be able to:Carry out & Supervise the Management of Sports Injuries with: various point of view including Role of Sports Physiotherapy; Cross-cultural perspectives; Extension of existing knowledge, Building–up of foundations, Role of truck in movement, and sports performance.Handle Career and Professional Readiness by: Establishing an Injury Management Facility Centre on sports sites Developing Business Philosophy and its application Offering Preventive Measures and strategiesWork on live models while applying hand-on knowledge in: Identification of Muscles (Primary and Secondary) responsible for movement Function with special emphasis on Trunk-coupling, (prevention, fitness and maintenance) Demonstrations and supervision in exercises of skill, Swiss ball , and Pilates performed with Swiss balls and Floor/Mattress Kiran Sandhu, H O D 235
  • 236. APPENDIX-VII: MEDIA OUTLOOK 236
  • 237. Appendix-VIII: Organizing Desk A ONE DAY WORKSHOP ON ‘MANAGEMENT OF SPORTS INJURIES’ on Wednesday, May 23, 2007 at Conference Centre, University of Delhi Organization Desk Reception • Dr. N. P. Sharma • Mr. Clement Rajkumar • Dr. J. P. Sharma • Dr. Rajbir Registration Forms and Seating Arrangement • Ms. Sonia Shalini • Mr. Praveen Saroha • Mr. Ajit Nair • Mr. Surender Rai Bhandoria • Mr. Sandeep Kumar • Mr. Kunal • Mr. Dharmender • Mr. Vishnu Parmar Registration and Accreditation • Dr. Lalit Sharma • Ms. Seema Kaushik Scientific Literature and Equipments Display • Dr. M.M.S. Bedi • Dr. Amita Rana • Dr. Anil Kalkal Hospitality and Banners • Dr. Anju Luthra • Dr. Kavita Sharma • Dr. Sunita Arora • Dr. Gauri Chakravorty • Ms. Seema V. Singh Practicum Support • Dr. Pradeep Chhikara • Mr. Nama Ashish Prem Singh Media and Report • Dr. S. K. Lau • Dr. Sheela • Dr. Savita Govil Certificates and Souvenirs • Dr. N. P. Sharma (Certificates) • Ms. Munesh Chakravortty (Souvenirs) Support : Administration, Finance & Secretariat • Mr. R.C. Rana (Administration) • Mr. Gulshan (Finance) • Ms. Kiran Chaudhary (Secretariat) • Mr. Ganesh (Helper) • Mr. Ishwar (Helper) 237
  • 238. BACK-COVER : REVISITING THE WORKSHOP - A PHOTO GALLERY 238
  • 239. 3.2 National Workshop on “Review and Development of Curriculum (M.P.Ed.) - Report & Photo Features Appendix-1 M.P.ED SEMESTER SYSTEM: CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT A Brief ReportAt the instance of Prof. Deepak Pental, the Vice Chancellor, University of Delhi and University GrantsCommission desiring for semester system to be introduced at Post Graduate level; the Department ofPhysical Education and Sports Sciences, University of Delhi took initiative to introduce Masters’ of PhysicalEducation (MPEd) by Semester System, to which Committee of Courses agreed in principle in its meetingon 27th September 2008. (Appendix-2.1)At the instance of Committee of Courses, a sub-committee (Appendix-2.2) developed the draft frameworkwith the academic assistance of research scholars of the department. The draft framework developed bythe sub committee was sent for observations to: 1. Banaras Hindu University, Banaras 2. GNDU, Amritsar 3. Jiwaji University, Gwalior 4. LNIPE, Shakti Nagar, Gwalior 5. Punjab Govt. College of Physical Education, Patiala 6. Aggasi College of Physical Education, Pune; 7. Department of Physical Education 8. Kalyani University, West Bengal 9. Principal, IGIPESS, University of Delhi 10. The Director, Physical Education, DUSC 11. Secretary, Association of Physical Education Teachers, University of DelhiThe suggestions received were incorporated, in the draft curriculum framework and its syllabi to be placedin National Workshop to “Review and Development of Curriculum M.P.Ed Semester System”.The National workshop was inaugurated by Prof. R. C. Kuhad, the Dean, Faculty of Interdisciplinary &Applied Sciences and the valedictory address was by Prof. U.S. Sharma, Former Dean, Faculty of Education,University of Delhi.The draft proposal was considered in the National Workshop held at the library of IGIPESS from 5th to 6thMarch 2008. Forty eight (48) delegates took part in the workshop (Appendix-2.3), who worked in variousgroups (Appendix-3) as per their expertise and professional experience to scrutinize, develop and refine thecurriculum.An internal review committee (Appendix-2.4) consolidated (on 7th, 8th & 9th March 2008) all the suggestionsreceived in National Workshop. The committee also reviewed the syllabi of various courses of study for thepurpose of uniformity, degree of difficulty, progression and presentation. As recommended by sub-committeesome part of the syllabi was sent to identify expert members (Appendix-2.5) for further input in the proposal.Hence, the present document is being sent for peer review to the Institutes/Departments/Colleges offeringM.P.Ed, IGIPESS, University of Delhi; BHU, Banaras; GNDU, Amritsar; LNIPE, Gwalior; Kannoor University,Kanoor; and Kurukshetra University.The future course of action intends to consolidate all the suggestion that will be received for placing thedocument before the committee of courses for the final approval and necessary forwarding to theUniversity of Delhi, for implementation w.e.f. July 2008. Dr. Kiran Sandhu HOD 239
  • 240. Appendix-2 LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS AND PARTICIPANTS S. No. Name Institution2.1 Members of Committee of Courses (Sept. 25 to 27, 2008) 1 Dr. Kiran Sandhu HOD, Department of Phy. Edu. & Sports Sciences 2 Dr. J S Naruka Director, Delhi University Sports Council 3 Dr. Usha Singh Daulat Ram College 4 Dr. M K Singh IGIPESS 5 Dr. N P Sharma IGIPESS 6 Dr. D. Shaw IGIPESS 7 Dr. Sandeep Tiwari IGIPESS 8 Dr. J P Sharma IGIPESS 9 Dr. Kalpna Sharma Noida College of Physical Education 10 Dr. Vijay IGIPESS 11 Dr. Rita Jain IGIPESS2.2 Members of Sub-Committee (Oct.27, 2007; Nov. 17, 2007; Feb. 9, 2008) 1 Dr. Kiran Sandhu HOD, DPESS (Chairperson) 2 Dr. Lalit Sharma IGIPESS (Member) 3 Dr. Pradeep Kumar IGIPESS (Secretary, Staff Council, IGIPESS) 4 Dr. Seema Kaushik Lakshmibai College (Member) 5 Dr. Sheila Gargi College (Member) 6 Dr. Saryu Ruhela Kamla Nehru College (Member) 7 Dr. Sandeep Tiwari IGIPESS (Coordinator)2.3 Participants of National Workshop (March 5-6, 2008) 1 Prof. S N Sharma Department of Phy. Edu., Panjab Univ., Chandigarh 2 Prof. M L Kamlesh Former Principal, LNIPE, Trivendrum 3 Prof. R N Dey Prof. LNIPE, Gwalior 4 Prof. Naina Nimkar Principal, Chendershekhar Aggasy College, Pune 5 Dr. Kiran Sandhu HOD, Department of Phy. Edu. & Sports Sciences 240
  • 241. S. No. Name Institution 6 Dr. D. K. Kansal Principal, IGIPESS (Director, National Workshop) 7 Dr. J. S. Naruka Delhi University Sports Council 8 Dr. Ajay Sahni Devi Ahilya University, Indore 9 Dr. Kalpna Sharma Noida College of Physical Education 10 Dr. Usha Singh Daulat Ram College 11 Dr. M K Singh IGIPESS 12 Dr. N P Sharma IGIPESS 13 Dr. D. Shaw IGIPESS 14 Dr. Sandeep Tiwari IGIPESS 15 Dr. J. P. Sharma IGIPESS 16 Dr. Anil Kr. Vanaik IGIPESS 17 Dr. Pardeep Kumar IGIPESS 18 Dr. Vijay IGIPESS 19 Dr. S. Chakraborty IGIPESS 20 Dr. Lalit sharma IGIPESS 21 Dr. Rajbir Singh IGIPESS 22 Dr. MMS Bedi IGIPESS 23 Dr. Sheela Kumari Gargi College 24 Dr. Saryu Ruhela Kamla Nehru College 25 Dr. Seema Kaushik Lakshmibai College 26 Sh. Clement Raj Kumar St. Stephens College 27 Dr. Kavita Sharma Daulat Ram College 28 Dr. Amita Rana Miranda House 29 Dr. Mukesh Saggar Janki Devi Memorial College 30 Dr. Suresh Lau Satyawati College (Eve.) 31 Dr. Anju Luthra Jesus & Mary College 32 Ms. Manisha Ramjas College 33 Mrs. Parveen Kaur SGTB Khalsa College 241
  • 242. S. No. Name Institution 34 Mr. Ajit Nair Research Scholar, DPESS 35 Mr. Sandeep Kumar Research Scholar, DPESS 36 Mr. Kunal Research Scholar, DPESS 37 Ms. Meenakshi Research Scholar, DPESS 38 Ms. Sonia Shalini IGIPESS 39 Mr. Surender Bhandoria Research Scholar, DPESS 40 Ms. Asha Rana Research Scholar, DPESS 41 Mr. Vishnu Parma Research Scholar, DPESS 42 Mr. Pawan Kumar Dabas Research Scholar, DPESS 43 Mr. Varun Nijhawan Research Scholar, Jamia Milia Islamia 44 Mr. Piyush Kumar Jain Research Scholar, DPESS 45 Ms. Neeti Rawat Student, IGIPESS 46 Ms. Garima Grover Student, IGIPESS 47 Ms. Saraswati Student, IGIPESS 48 Ms. Rekha Gupta Student, IGIPESS2.4 Internal Review Committee Members (March 7th to 9th , 2008) 1 Dr. Kiran Sandhu Chairperson, National Workshop 2 Prof. M. L. Kamlesh Chairperson 3 Prof. S. N. Sharma Delegates, Workshop 4 Dr. Lalit Sharma Coordinator, Group work 5 Dr. Seema Kaushik Co-Coordinator, Group work 6 Dr. Sandeep Tiwari Coordinator, National Workshop2.5 External Review Members 1 Prof. Ramesh Pal LNIPE, Gwalior 2 Prof. A.K. Dutta LNIPE, Gwalior 3 Prof. Gangopadhyaya LNIPE, Gwalior 4 Prof. Mukherjee LNIPE, Gwalior 5 Prof. P.K. Pandey LNIPE, Gwalior 242
  • 243. 243
  • 244. Appendix-3 GROUP NORMS National Workshop on Review and Development of Curriculum M.P.Ed Group ** (##) @ Subject ($$) Sports (x)Group (xx) (&)Add on Assistance Members Existing Compulso Specialization Specializat optional -I Group courses (36 by M.P.Ed. ry Study study for four ion study study for optional Hours) to be Research Review Paper for Semester for three one -II study during Scholars Syllabus one Semester semester study vacation and Semester for one addition time semeste rProf. (Ms.) ** (##) @ (xx) (&) Mr. AjitNaina Nimkar P.P.C.D Professional Sports Sports &(Convener) Educationa Preparation & Journalis Community lDr. Kalpana Curriculum Design m Volunteer TechnologSharma in Physical Leadership y& EducationDr Kiran PedagogySandhu Techniques Module -I, II, III & IVDr J.S Naruka ** @ (x) (xx) (&) Mr.(Convener) Surender Sports Sports Management Fundament Sports Study of BhandoriaDr. (Mrs.) Usha Managem als of Industr Olympics Module -I, II, III &Singh ent Sports y& IV (&) Manageme MarketiDr. Samiran nt & ng- AdventureChakravorty Administra Sports &Mr. Varun tion LeadershipNijhawan Training (Module- II)Prof. M.L. ** @ (x) Ms.Kamlesh Meenakshi Sports Module –I Fundament(Convener) Psycholog (Foundation/Educati als ofDr. N.P. y on Sports SportsSharma Psychology), PsychologyDr. Lalit II (Personality TraitSharma Structure of ** Athletes),Dr. Rajbir (x)Singh Sports III (Sports Sociology Psychometrics) & Fundament & Social IV (Psychological als of Welfare basis to maximizing Sports Performance) Sociology @ Sports Sociology Module I,II, III , IVDr. (Ms.) M.K. ** (##) (x) (xx) (&) Mr. PiyushSingh Kumar Jain Health Athletes Fundament Sports Life Saving(Convener) Education Care & als of Therapy Skills &Dr. Vijay & First Rehabilitati Health Disaster 244
  • 245. Group ** (##) @ Subject ($$) Sports (x)Group (xx) (&)Add on Assistance Members Existing Compulso Specialization Specializat optional -I Group courses (36 by M.P.Ed. ry Study study for four ion study study for optional Hours) to be Research Review Paper for Semester for three one -II study during Scholars Syllabus one Semester semester study vacation and Semester for one addition time semeste r Aid on Education Management ** (&) Sports Sports Medicine Physical Activity & NutritionDr. D. Shaw ** (##) @ (x) Mr. Pawan (&)(Convener) Research Research Sports Fundament Kumar ComputerDr Ajay Sahni Process & Design & Biomechanics al of Sports Dabas Application inDr. Lalit Statistic Statistic in Module -I, II, III & Biomechan PhysicalSharma Physical IV ics EducationDr. Sandeep ** EducationTiwari Sports Module –IDr. Pardeep Biomecha & IIKumar nics (##) ** Scientific Scientific Methods of Methods Training & of Coaching Training Module –I & & II CoachingProf. S.N. ** (xx) Ms. (&)Sharma Measurem Fitness Garima Sports for all(Convener) ent & & Ms. AshaDr. D. K. Evaluatio Wellness RanaKansal n in (&)Dr. Sandeep Physical Sports fieldTiwari Education TechnologiesDr. J.P. SharmaProf. R. N. Dey ** @ (x) Ms. Niti (&)(Convener) Exercise Exercise Physiology Fundament Rawat ExerciseDr. (Mrs.) Physiolog (Module –I, II,III & als of PrescriptionKalpana y IV) ExerciseMs. Sonia PhysiologyShaliniDr. Samiran ** ($$) Dr. Seema (&)Chakraborty Game of Module –I Kaushik Gymnasium(Convener) Specializa (Training Ms. OperationsDr. (Ms.) M.K tion & Skill SaraswatiSingh (Individua Acquisition Ms. Rekha 245
  • 246. Group ** (##) @ Subject ($$) Sports (x)Group (xx) (&)Add on Assistance Members Existing Compulso Specialization Specializat optional -I Group courses (36 by M.P.Ed. ry Study study for four ion study study for optional Hours) to be Research Review Paper for Semester for three one -II study during Scholars Syllabus one Semester semester study vacation and Semester for one addition time semeste r Dr. (Mrs.) l & Dual ), Gupta Saryu Rohilla Sports) Module-II Mr. Vishnu Dr. J.P. Sharma (Coaching Parmar Sh. Clement Raj Kumar Dr. (Mrs.) & Kavita Sharma Performanc Dr. (Mrs.) e)& Amita Rana Module-III Dr. (Ms.) (Organizati Seema Kaushik on & Dr. (Mrs.) Usha Manageme Singh nt) Dr. Suresh Lau Mrs. Parveen Kaur Dr N.P Sharma ** ($$) (&) Ms. Sonia (Convener) Games of Module –I Sports field Shalini Dr. (Ms.) Specializa (Training Technologies Mr. Kunal Sheela tion & Skill Mr. Dr. Anil Vanaik Team acquisition Sandeep Dr. (Mrs.) Anju Sports ), Kumar Luthra Module-II Dr. (Mrs.) (Coaching Mukesh Saggar & Dr. (Ms.) Performanc Parveen Kaur e)& Dr. Rajbir Module-III Singh (Organizati Ms. Manisha on & Manageme nt)Proposal/Material of Master’s of Physical Education Semester System Prepared and compiled byMs. Kiran Chaudhary(Junior Assistant)Deptt. of Phy.Edu. & Spts. Scs. D.U.Contact: 9811451787 246
  • 247. 247
  • 248. 3.3 Three days Volunteer Training on “Community and Sports Volunteers Leadership” - Report & Photo Features A Brief ReportTrainers CourseCOMMUNITY & SPORTS VOLUNTEERS LEADERSHIP18-20 March 2008Conference Centre, University of DelhiOrganised byDEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION & SPORTS SCIENCESUNIVERSITY OF DELHISupport & Sponsored byBRITISH COUNCIL AND YOUTH SPORT TRUST, U KAn International Inspiration- India InitiativeResource Person:Katie Donovan, Youth Sports U K Department of Physical Education & Sports Sciences University of Delhi 248
  • 249. AcknowledgementsIt is to acknowledge University of Delhi, especially Prof. S K Tondon, the Pro-vice Chancellor of University of Delhi for the sanction & approval for organizing the training course; The British Council and Youth Sports Trust, UK for providing the sponsorship, technical support, resource material, and the resource person-trainer for the course; The Finance Officer, Sh. Roy Matrani, for his kind availability to inaugurate the course and support and back-up provided to the course participants; The Dean, Faculty of Interdisciplinary & Applied Sciences, University of Delhi, for giving the Valedictory address and providing certification to the participants; The trainer of course, Ms.Katie Donovan, for transacting the course in vigorous, lively, & active mode of teaching- learning process. The Principal, Indira Gandhi Institute of Physical Education & Sports Sciences, Dr. D K Kansal for his advocacy for physical education to be an area of interst for all; The Director, Physical Education, Delhi University Sports Council, Dr. J S Naruka for his guidance to professional colleagues to move forward; Dr. Mrs Pathak from Delhi University Sports Council, for encouragement provided to participants and organisers all through the training; The Principals of all Colleges, who deputed Physical Education Staff for training; All the participants for their creativity, commitment, and determined participation in the training course; Head, Sports & Education, British Council, Ms. Mona Shipley for her sheer enthusiasm and conformity to the initiatives & persuasiveness of the Department of Physical Education & Sports Sciences, DU, to hold the training course; All the fellow friends who helped in the conduct of the training; and above all Almighty God for making path for contributing towards a professional cause. Dr. Kiran Sandhu Head of Department 249
  • 250. ContentsAcknowledgementsLIST OF PARTICIPANTSTHE COURSE CONTENTSTHE MODE OF STUDYCOURSE OUTCOMEJOURNEY SO FAR… A proposal for University of Delhi: UVS UVS : University Volunteer Service- An Initiative of University of DelhiBACK DROP CONCERNS India’s demographic advantage Higher Education Settings in IndiaOPTIMISTIC DIMENSIONS CONSOLIDATING INDIAN CONDITIONS Availability of Programmes Availability of Incentives What Is Lacking? Volunteer & Community Leadership in today’s contextSET-UP OF UNIVERSITY OF DELHI: A PROPOSAL Vision......... Objectives............ Awards & Incentives.......WHAT AND HOW ...U V S WILL WORK????? Annual Calendar & Proposed ActivitiesINTEGRATION IN EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMMETALENT SEARCH: LEVEL OF COLLEGE VOLUTEER SERVICE (CVS) Format Enrolment Time Commitment InterviewVOLUNTEERS: ROLE & DEPLOYMENT Volunteers may be trained in different capacities Areas of PlacementOUTCOMES… What the Young Leaders will Gain? What Will University Gain? What will Community Gain?POTENTIAL LINKAGES…Supplementary A Brief Professional Profile of the Trainer-Katie Dononvan The Programme Programme Background Glimpses: Media & Photos 250
  • 251. LIST OF PARTICIPANTS 1. Dr. Saryu Rohella Kamla Nehru College, D U 2. Dr. Sheela Kumari Gargi College, DU 3. Dr. Amita Rana Miranda House, DU 4. Dr. Anju Luthra Jesus & Marry College, DU 5. Dr. Lalit Sharma IGIPESS, DU 6. Dr. Anjum Desh Bandhu College, DU 7. Dr Rajbeer Singh IGIPESS, DU 8. Dr. R S Mann S B S College, DU 9. Dr. ParmodSharma K M College, DU 10. Sh. Mukesh Kohli R L A College ( Eve), DU 11. Ms Muneesh Ramjas College, DU 12. Dr. Seema Kaushik Laxmi Bai College, DU 13. Dr. Sunita Arora Laxmi Bai College, DU 14. Dr. Kavita Sharma Daulat Ram College, DU 15. Ms. Sonia Shalini IGIPESS, DU 16. Mr. Virender Shyam Lal College, DU 17. Mrs. M Madan S P M College, DU 18. Mrs. Kuljeet Kaur SRCC, Du 19. Mr. Rohit Pawar, Student, IGIPESS, D U 20. Ms. Garima Grover, Student, IGIPESS, DU 21. Ms. Cherry Luthra Student, J M C, DU 22. Mr. S Sondhi, Delhi Univ Sports Council 23. Mrs Pillai B C Nominee 24. Dr. Anil Kalkal Rajdhani College, DU 25. Mr. Sandeep Dept. of Phy.Edu. & Sports Scs. DU 26. Ms. Meenakshi Dept. of Phy.Edu. & Sports Scs. DU 27. Ms. Mona Shipley British Council 28. Dr. Kiran Sandhu Dept. of Phy.Edu. & Sports Scs. DU 29. Ms. K Chaudhary Dept. of Phy.Edu. & Sports Scs. DU 30. Mr. Ajit Dept. of Phy.Edu. & Sports Scs. DU 31. Mr . Surender Kumar Bhandoria Dept. of Phy.Edu. & Sports Scs. DUTHE COURSE CONTENTS COVERED THE THEMATIC OF : What is happening already in the Delhi Schools; What is philosophy in training young leaders; What is the benefit for the young person & country; How do we prepare young people to take on roles in sport leadership (training pack); What is the volunteer framework which the newly trained leaders can practice – events, ceremonies, festivals etc.; What support is needed for teachers and for the leaders to experience success & skill building leading up to the Commonwealth GamesTHE MODE OF STUDY WAS A COMBINATION OF : Presentations, workbook, group discussions, learning activities, & professional reflection.COURSE OUTCOME The 3 days of learning by doing; Know the-selves better; With more confidence Better understanding of leadership learning teaching process to present to young people; Stronger in belief of how to use sport to develop young people for the befit of community; And, a Draft of Localized Conceptual Plan for University of Delhi on creating provisions of Sports & Community Volunteer Service Scheme. 251
  • 252. JOURNEY SO FAR… In the Background during the Trainer’s Course on Sports and Community Volunteer Leadership, there was a lots of learning, fun, activities, projects, training-pack, assignments, reading- material, work-book, professional reflections and interactions were part of the training course. The learning was applied in the local context and simultaneously, A proposal for University of Delhi has been developed by all the course-participants and they named it .......UVS UVS University Volunteer Service An Initiative of University of Delhi BAC K DRO P CON UVS CER University Volunteer NS Service India ’s dem ogra phic adva CVS CVS CVS ntag e 5 College Volunteer Service College Volunteer Service College Volunteer Service 4 % i s below 25 years of age - 600 million approx; • 70% is below 35 years of age- 750 million approx • 50% drop out below Class 5 o Out of the remaining 50, 25 drop out at Class 8 o At Class 10 and 12 only 48% and 52% pass o That leaves us with 6 to 7 children who clear Class 12 o So out of the 100, only 7 finish schoolHigher Education Settings in India • Academic Based Courses • Career Courses - Changing Trends • Students’ Grooming is Outside the University Structure • Need for provisions for Student-Development within the University Structure • Is learning only academics? • What is the level of Engagement?OPTIMISTIC DIMENSIONS CONSOLIDATING INDIAN CONDITIONS Availability of Programmes o N.S.O., N.C.C. and N.S.S. o Sports Competitions at Zonal, Inter-Zonal, State, National level – Availability of Coaching- Centers /Training-Venues/ Stadiums etc. o Activities for Mass Participation in All Schools 252
  • 253. Availability of Incentives • Scholarships - for winning medals • Fee-concession • Prizes What Is Lacking? • Development of Sport and Development through Sport • An interactive approach Volunteer & Community Leadership in today’s context Reference Points are • International Inspiration • Youth Sport Trust, UK • British Council, Delhi • NSO, NCC & NSSSET-UP OF UNIVERSITY OF DELHI: A PROPOSAL Vision......... Create Provisions and Provide Opportunities for Integrated Programme of Volunteering while Studying at University To Train Talent, Enhance Life Skills & Strengthening the Human Relations Objectives............ 1. To motivate, identify, & train university youth to take to sports & community volunteering to develop confidence and leadership abilities 2. Organize and manage multi-skill activities and sports events for the University and its other links of community 3. Provide extended community service to school sector by providing training to teachers and helping to run the sports programmes effectively 4. To create a committed and motivated youth which will propel India to become a super power Awards & Incentives....... first step to be a worthy and active citizen Register with U V S Complete forty hours of volunteer service and win an award of Volunteer leadership Open to all students from all parts of the UniversityWHAT AND HOW ...U V S WILL WORK????? Annual CalendarWork Plan TIME- STRATEGIESAdvocacy April-May Promotion material, Notices, contact Program with authoritiesRegistration of Trainers June Finalization of Resource material, Training pedagogy, Activity Module, Listing of eventsInvolvement/Registration July-Aug At the time of AdmissionYoung Leader/sLeadership training & work in Teams 15 Aug- Six week provision of opportunities for young leader. Enabling themto plan a multi-skill 30 Sept develop multi-skills.activity /Sports Fest.Conference for peer presentation, Last working UVS invites& nominates young leaders to attend the young leadersprofessional reflections day of the strand of the one-day UVS Conference, and then share the learning first term with themRange of Activities Oct to Jan • UVS will provide tool kit to each representing unit as per the requirement of the Programme. • UVS will confirm the placement of young leader identifying an appropriate Programme based volunteer requirement.Fun and Frolic Jan UVS will organize the camp for young leaders to spend time of togetherness to foster friendship, respect, belongingnessFeed back Feb-March Filling of feed back by volunteering young leader and master trainers. Train the trainers for schools; & help School Sports PROPOSED ACTIVITIES ARE LISTED BELOW: 253
  • 254. • Departmental program • Inter & Intra-campus program • Interdepartmental group • Programme for less privileged Children • Program for women • Co-education and recreation games • Extension Community Services (school, clubs, colleges, community sports) • Health, Fitness, and Wellness • Recreation and Fun events for Executives & teacher communityINTEGRATION IN EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMME • Capsule Course – Any student in the college; Max. No. – 20; Certificate at the end of the Course • Application Course in B.A. (Programme.) – Only for 3rd year students; Max. No. – 20; Part of B.A. (Programme) • Trainers for the Community and from the Community – For those who did either of the above mentioned Course; – Specialized Areas, Disaster Management, Festival Management, Sports Programme for the Community by Linking-up with RWAS (Bhagidari Scheme of Delhi Govt.)TALENT SEARCH: LEVEL OF COLLEGE VOLUTEER SERVICE (CVS) Arts science commerce 10 5 5 Orientation by CVS to all college students, Enrolment with CVS Format Enrolment • Name Stream Class Section Roll Number • Address Phone Number • Interest------------------------------------------------------- Time Commitment • 5hrs< ; 10hrs< ; 20hrs< ;40hrs< Have you ever participated in voluntary services: yes/no how many hours have you already put in? >5hrs ; >10hrs; >20hrs; >40hrs Interview • Personality ,Problem Solving Ability, Attitude Towards Voluntary ServicesVOLUNTEERS: ROLE & DEPLOYMENT Volunteers may be trained in different capacities, such as • Administrative Leadership – Executive meetings, convocations, conventions, ceremonies etc. • Sport Technical Leadership – Coaches, officials, Ushers, Medical and training specialists • Non-sport Technical Services – Registration, Fund-raising, Transportation, Supervision etc. • Community Services Leadership – Extending services to the University community and its links • School Community Volunteers – Extending services to the Schools sector for effective sports programme Areas of Placement Crèche, Schools, Special Schools – visually/mentally challenged etc., Community Centers, Clubs, Federations, N.G.O.s, Slums, Rehabilitation Centers, Health Clubs, Old Age Home, Local/National/International Meets, Intramurals/Inter-College/Inter-university Competitions, Population Surveys, 254
  • 255. Election Duty – Assistance, Various Projects of the Govt. like Yuva Selection for Placement Time spent in the training, Skills, Time Availability, Nature of the Job, Other competenciesOUTCOMES…What the Young Leaders will Gain? Fun and Enjoyment • Introspection & targets for new learning • Exposure to Multi skills • Identity , Self-esteem, • Involvement in Community Service • Volunteering – serving self-less • Recognition – Awards, reward, friendship • Preparation for life rolesWhat Will University Gain? • Pioneers in training volunteers in higher edu. • Youth energy channeled in positive outcomes • Reduced Discipline Problems in university • Trained Human Resources for Crisis management • Added capacity building • Brand ambassador for university of Delhi • Ready, informed Workforce for D U local events • Raised profile of university of DelhiWhat will Community Gain? • Professional volunteers • Motivated and disciplined youth • Standardized services on tap • “We - feeling” • Mutual respect and tolerancePotential Linkages… Potentials for Delhi University Linking with: Govt. of India; Schools; National & international organizations; U K Sport; UNICEF; DFID; Foreign & Commonwealth office; British Council; CII; Health & Fitness IndustrySPORTS & COMMUNITY VOLUNTEERS SERVICE18-20 March 2008, Conference Centre, University of DelhiProgramme BackgroundThe University of Delhi Sports Department visualizes to offer Sports & Community Volunteer training to all its students, especially thoseundertaking physical education courses & sports participation. The participation of the students would provide an opportunity to trainresources to step in to the world of sport and physical education and for providing ready and aware work-force as Volunteer coordinators forsuccessful running of the sports and other activity oriented Programme in the university and its other links.It is important to establish Why Volunteer; what is volunteer investment Programme? What are the Useful Volunteer Links? Where are theVolunteer opportunities? Who will be Available volunteer? How to get Volunteer training? The Proposed courses/training shall explore andestablish the area of Volunteering so far unorganized, and unattended.Hence there is a need to organize Sports & Community Volunteer training Programme for our staff who can carry on the training of studentson an ongoing basis in the university. Such a training will not only create trained staff , but will also help create a workforce in the universitywhich could be skillfully utilized for the events of national importance and for university of Delhi, e.g. International sports events especiallythe forth coming Common Wealth Games, National games and other events of state& university level.Course ObjectivesA train the trainer’s course to offer Sports & Community Volunteer training.For Students and Staff:Develop a wider social perspective; enhance skills and gain qualifications, confidence and experience.For the University:Enhance links between the University Department and local communities, supporting the aim to promote participation in sport and healthyactivity for the whole community and the Universitys "Widening Participation Strategy. 255
  • 256. For the Community:Provide qualified, passionate volunteers to a variety of colleges, schools, clubs, Sports projects and other such events. This increasesparticipation opportunities and positive experiences for young people in local areas.THE PROGRAMME: SPORTS AND COMMUNITY VOLUNTEER LEADERSHIP18-03-0809: 15 A.M. Assembly of Participants and Registration09: 30 A.M. Ice-breaking, About the Course, Group Norms,10: 15 A.M. Tea10: 30 A.M. Session-I Inaugural11: 15 A.M. Session II Study Course12: 30 P.M. Session III Group work 1: 30 P.M. Lunch 2:15 P.M. Session IV Study Course 3: 30 P.M. Tea 3: 45 P.M. Session II Group work 5: 00 P.M. Day Closing19-03-0809: 30 A.M. Session-I Study Course-Training Pack10: 45 A.M. Tea11: 00 A.M. Session II Study Course- Training Pack12: 30 P.M. Session III Group work 1: 30 P.M. Lunch 2:15 P.M. Session IV Study Course- Training Pack 3: 30 P.M. Tea 3: 45 P.M. Session V Group work- Work Book 5: 00 P.M. Day Closing20-03-0809: 30 A.M. Session-I Study Course-Training Pack10: 45 A.M. Tea11: 00 A.M. Session II Study Course- Work Book12: 30 P.M. Session III Group work- Experience Sharing 1: 30 P.M. Lunch 2:15 P.M. Session IV Professional Reflections 3: 30 P.M. Tea 3: 45 P.M. Session V Valedictory 5: 00 P.M. Tea and Day ClosingA brief professional profile of the TrainerRoseanne Katherine Donovan prefers to be known as Katie Donovan.Katie is American but actually spent time at school in England at Chelsea school of Physical Education before returning to the USA to work.She has come from a Sports College background, trained as a Physical Education teacher and coached at a local, state and national level inField hockey, basketball, tennis and softball.Katie went through the US school hierarchy, becoming Head of the PE Department in her school and then Athletic Director. She then leftworking in education and went to head the US coaching programme ASEP (American Sport Effectiveness Programme) for Human Kinetics.From there, through the USOC (United States Olympic Committee) and IOC (International Olympic Committee) she was invited to come toBritain to head Champion Coaching which involved parallel Coaching development and Player development for young people outside ofschool. Katie worked in the UK for 4 Years and at this time she was also a Senior Lecturer in Sport development at the University ofSheffield.Katie then moved back to the USA. She became Head teacher of a small rural school where she stayed for about 4 years before beingrecruited as Head teacher of a very successful secondary school. Katie had accomplished everything she wanted in education and decided tomove into Student Engagement based between US and UK. This is where she is now, working for Endocott College as Director ofInternational Student engagement programmes, helping schools and organisations raise the aspirations of their students and their staff.Katie is very excited about being invited to India to do this training. She is very committed to the use of leadership to develop young people,their confidence and responsibility in sport and education. 256
  • 257. Glimpses of “Master’s Trainers Course on Sports & Community Volunteer Leadership” 18-20 March 2008 at Conference Centre, Delhi University, India. 257
  • 258. 3.4 One day Students Seminar on Application Course in Physical Education - Report & Photo Features The One day Students Seminar on Application Course in Physical Education was organization on 24th March 2008 at Miranda House, University of Delhi. 46 students from various colleges of University of Delhi, registered for seminar. Eleven presentations were made, and well debated. Dr. Pratibha Jolly, the Principal, Miranda House, inaugurated the seminar and Dr. Kiran Sandhu presided over.3.5 Workshop of Teachers on “Revisiting Application Course: Fitness, Aerobics and Gym-Operations” - Report & Photo Features The students seminar was follow up by a Workshop of Teachers on “Revisiting Application Course: Fitness, Aerobics and Gym-Operations” on 25th March 2008 at Miranda House, University of Delhi. 47 Teachers registered as delegate. The eight presentations were made by the Teachers representatives of: i) Daulat Ram College, University of Delhi ii) Gargi College, University of Delhi iii) Jesus & Mary College, University of Delhi iv) Miranda House, University of Delhi v) Ramjas College, University of Delhi vi) Satyawati College (Evening) vii) SGTB Khalsa College viii) St. Stephen’s College, University of Delhi Dr. D. K. Kansal, the Principal, IGIPESS, inaugurated the seminar and Dr. Kiran Sandhu presided over. Dr. S. Pathak, Deputy Director, DUSC, was the guest of honor at valedictory session. Dr. Purnima Roy, fellow coordinator of B.A. Programme was also present. The suggestion received during students seminar and Teachers workshop were debated and consolidated, and recommended to the B.A. Programme Committee. 258
  • 259. 259
  • 260. 4. INCENTIVES & AWARDS 4.1 Ph.D. – Scholarship/Teacher Assistantship Please contact from University of Delhi. 4.2 M.P.Ed. Gold Medal has been instituted to be known as “Manohar Lal Kapoor Memorial Medal” for academic topper student in Master of Physical Education (M.P.Ed) Examination. 4.3 B.P.Ed. Gold Medal has been instituted to be known as “R. k. Khanna Memorial Medal” for academic topper student in Bachelor of Physical Education (B.P.Ed) Examination.5. INTERNATIONAL INITIATIVES 5.1 Government of Korea The Research Proposal of Physical Education of Mr. Surender Kumar Bhandoria ‘Promotion of Taekwondo in India: An Appraisal and Development of Framework of a Long-Term Plan’ (A research scholar of Department of Physical Education & Sports Sciences) under the supervision of Dr. Kiran Sandhu has been accepted to study in Korea by Ministry of Culture and Tourism, Government of Korea in the project “Taekwondo Goodwill Program” from 15th May to 14th November 2008 a partner initiative for study in Korea.6. PROPOSED PROGRAMME 6.1 Research and Faculty Development ProgrammeSCHOLAR & FACULTY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMMESCHOLAR & FACULTY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME ‘METHODOLOGY & INITIATIVES IN RESEARCH INPHYSICAL EDUCATION & SPORTS’RATIONALEIn pursuance of the belief that quality of life can be achieved through quality learning experiences, it is proposed toorganise on an ongoing basis a programme of Scholar & Faculty Development on ‘Methodology & Initiatives InResearch In Physical Education & Sports’. It aims to attempt to profile the future of scholars by laying strongacademic foundations, innovative research skills, sound and logical application of knowledge in life for achievinghigher learning in physical education, games and sports, health, fitness and life skills.The scholars in Physical Education & Sports usually come with an indefinite or a sort of blurred visions of whatexactly research is, unless they have gone through the experiences and up gradation on ever increasingknowledge, which is rarely so, especially in the absence of any professionally organised opportunities of any well-ordered and regimented Programme in research methodology as per their needs and requirements. More thanoften their experiences include a master’s dissertation. They face difficulties not only in identifying the researchareas of their interest but also in formulating research proposals and pursue Doctoral research Programme. Suchparameters unintentionally influence the choices and actions in life and professional development.Therefore, it is befitting that a regular scholar and Faculty Development Programme may provide an opportunity fordevelopment on an on going basis. It is strongly felt that such Programme design must meet the needs of not onlystudents, but, also of the Faculty members who are keen to upgrade in research methodology. 260
  • 261. OBJECTIVES :The identified objectives of Scholar & Faculty Development Programme (SFDP) 1. Knowledge : the focus of knowledge area will be to develop among participants the: • Conceptualization of research problem in context to the theoretical framework. • Understanding of tools of statistical analysis. • Research Findings Presentation and its formatting. 2. Skill : The focus of skill area will be to develop among participants the : • Assessment of Skills available among participants • Finding the research problem • Primary and Secondary data analysis on a range of possible analysis • Co-relating research finding with research objectives, questions/ hypothesis • Establishing relationship among research finding & broader theoretical framework • Computer Applications • Regression of research finding format; and Research Reports.APPROCHESTo achieve the identified objectives the approaches of the proposed programme of Scholar and FacultyDevelopment will comprise of the theory and practice based session focusing on : 1. Formulating A Research Proposal, Collecting and Reviewing Literature, 2. Defining Research Problem and Formulating Hypothesis 3. Choosing The Appropriate Research Design 4. Sampling 5. Methods of Data – Collection 6. Analysis of Data – Univariate, Bivariate, Multivariate 7. Model Building & Decision Making 8. Statistical Software Packages 9. Writing Research Reports 10. Power Points PresentationsMODULES OF THE PROGRAMMEThere will be three level of Programme with progressive level of course contains. The Programme of Scholarand Faculty Development will be available in two modules of each level: -(1) Module 1 : Weekend Programme Day : Every Friday/or a pre-assigned day of the week Time : 1:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Duration : 3 sessions per day 5 hours duration per day 12 Fridays/days equal to 12 x 5 = 60 hours Programme of study plus the three weekends will be for research seminar and proposal Development workshops & presentations on pre-assigned days Attendance : 90 percent attendance is compulsory to be eligible for certificate of completion/award(2) Module 2 : Autumn / winter break of the academic session 261
  • 262. It will provide the Programme on a regular basis for 12 days x 8 hours = 96 hours inclusive of an hour lunch per day, seminar, workshops and presentation.CREDIT LEVEL AND REGISTRATION FEES:There will be possibility of participation in three different credit levels of level one* SFDTas per the Suitability andrequirement of the candidate. One may choose credit one/two/three or any two or all three.For Credit Level I, II and III (All Three) Rs. 1000/-For Credit Level I and II (or any two) Rs. 860/-For Credit Level I or II or III (Any One) Rs. 500/-COMPULSORY REQUIREMENT : Mention PleaseTheme : _____________________________________________Area of Research : _____________________________________________Scientific Investigation : _____________________________________________AWARD AND CERTIFICATION :Certification of completion will be awarded only if a candidate attended 90 percent of study for each module. Note: * For level two and level three of SFDT the credit level II, III, and I will be compulsory in order. Eligibility of level II and III will be successful completion of level I and II respectivelyProgramme : Credit Level OneModule : Module I will start from 1st September, and Module-II will be in the October break i.e. 1st October to 15th October 2007Day and Time : Each Friday or Pre assigned days/ dates - 1:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.Detailed Time schedule of each Module : • 1:00 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. 1st Period • Tea Break for 15 minutes • 2:45 p.m. to 4:15 p.m. 2nd Period • Tea Break for 15 minutes • 4:30 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. 3rd PeriodTotal three periods each day, One period for course work/ Seminar/ Workshop/ Assignment/ Practice etc; Twoperiods for Lecturers on the course contentsProgramme : Credit Level TwoModule - I : 3rd week of October, 2007 onwardsModule - II : 3rd week of December, 2007 to January, 2008Programme : Credit Level ThreeModule - I : 10th May, 2008 onwardsModule - II : 15th June to 1st July, 2008DRAFT CONTENTS OF LEVEL ONE PROGRAMME.Course Contents of level one*:Credit Level - I : • Fundamental of Research and Research Proposal • Selection and Location of Problem (Research area/Topic) • Formulation of Hypothesis • Types of Research 262
  • 263. • An Introduction to research Design • Survey of Literature, Library search • Preparation of Research Proposal • Preparation of abstract of research report • Footnote, Bibliography and references usesCredit Level - II : • Ethic in research • Sampling, Basic Statistical Analysis • Sampling of Research Design and appropriate statistics • Sample and Population • Variable and parameters • Level of significance • Level of confidence • One tail test • Two-tail test • Type one error • Type two error • Reliability of Date • Types of Sampling • Methods of Sampling • Measure of Central Tendency • Measure of Variability • Coefficient of variance • Normal Probability Principles, properties and uses • ‘t’ test, ANOVA, correlation statistics • Research design in experimental researchCredit Level - III : • Selected non parametric and Advance Statistics • X (chi square) and its different applications • Non-parametric ANOVA, rank order correlation • Multiple correlation and regression analysis • An Introduction to factor analysis and other multivariate applications • Testing the hypothesis and inferential analysis • Mechanism and methods of research writingNote: * Course of level II and III will be proposed in future. . 263
  • 264. 6.2 Adventure Sports Training Adventure Sports Leadership Training – A Collaborative Project with YHA: Adventure Sports Leadership Training: A Collaborative Project with Youth Hostelling Association of India, Programme for Students of University Of DelhiTITLE : ADVENTURE SPORTS LEADERSHIP TRAINING PROGRAMMEDURATION : 3 TO 7 DAYS DURING SUMMER VACATIONSNATURE/TYPES : RESIDENTIAL CAMP IN DELHIpNUMBER IN A GROUP : APPROXIMATELY THIRTYCOST : AS LOW AS POSSIBLECERTIFICATION : DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION & SPORTS SCIENCES, UNIV. OF DELHI OBJECTIVES Adventure sport is a priority area of University Grants Commission, Ministry of Human Resources, Ministry of Youth affairs & Sports and also has been listed as one of the eligibility conditions for the admission to the courses of Physical Education by NCTE. Some part of the theoretical components is being studied in some of the courses of Physical Education being offered by the University of Delhi, but under the present circumstances, the practical training needs to be offered to the students to take it further in their career and life skills. Therefore, with the given background, the matter was followed up with the objective to organize practical training and inter active learning of theoretical components for the students who wish to advance their skill in the area. A COLLABORATIVE PROJECT Proposal of a collaborative project for adventures sports leadership training Programme for students of University of Delhi has been finalized to be organized in collaboration with Youth Hostels Association of India. The YHA has agreed in principle to provide technical support and facilities for students to be trained (reference decision National executive committee of YHA dated 24th February 2007 communicated wide reference no.nil dated 1.3.2007) UGC support such Programme as a priority area and provides financial assessment. PROGRAMME THREE DAYS PROGRAMME Adventure sports cover a variety of adventure activity programme including Trekking, Hiking, Mountain Biking, Expeditions and Rock Climbing etc. PART-A: THEORY The components of theory will cover extensive orientation on:- • ‘Adventure Sports as a Value Concept , Range & Types of Activities’; • ‘Organisation of Adventure Sports’; • ‘Responsibilities of Leadership’; • ‘Group Norms-Team-Building, Sharing & Caring, Personality Development’; • Developing Departmental Paper PART-B: PRACTICAL With in the facilities and feasibility of organization, the components of Practical Training will cover learning of ‘Skill Experiences’ on:- • Rock Climbing, Cycling, Nature Exploration, Rescue operations-Tents pitching, Knots and Ladders etc., Campfire/ Recreational Programs PART-C: SELF-EVALUATION & ASSESSMENT 264
  • 265. To evaluate the understanding and outcome of learning in pre & post participation in programme, & award of certification, suitable assessment method will be employed.PROGRAMME SCHEDULE: BASIC TRAINING PROGRAMMEFIRST DAY 1. Assembly at the International Youth Hostel, New Delhi - 10 A.M. 2. Introduction and Inauguration - 10.30 A.M. 3. Tea Break - 11.30 to 11.45 AM 4. Lecture (First) - 11.30 to 1.00 P.M. 5. Lunch Break - 1 P.M. to 2 P.M. 6. Lecture (second) - 2 P.M. to 3 P.M. 7. Tea Break - 3 P.M. to 3.15 P.M. 8. Lecture (third) - 3.15 P.M. to 4.15 PM. 9. Dinner - 7.30 to 8.30 P.M. 11. Campfire - 8.30 P.M. to 9.30 P.M.SECOND DAY 1. Morning Tea - 05.30 A.M. 2. Morning walk for bird watching and - 06.00 to 07.30 A.M. Nature exploration 3. Breakfast (on spot) - 07.30 A.M. 4. Rock Climbing Training - 08.30 to 1.00 P.M. 5. Back to hostel for Lunch - 1.00 to 2.00 P.M. 6. Practical Training on rescue operations, tent pitching, knots, ropes and ladders etc. - 2.00 to 3.30 P.M. 7. Tea Break - 3.30 to 3.45 P.M. 8. First Aid Training and Slide Show - 3.45 to 5.45 P.M. 9. Dinner - 7.30 to 8.30 P.M. 10. Astronomy and star gazing - 8.30 to 9.30 P.M.THIRD DAY 1. Morning Tea - 05.30 A.M. 2. Cycling Tour - 06.00 to 7.30 A.M. 3. Breakfast - 7.30 to 8.30 AM. 4. Lecture of preparing Departmental Paper