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By: Crystal Stuy
 Mental Health -> “ Successful performance of
mental function, resulting in productive activities,
fulfilling relationshi...
Bipolar Disorder
 Mood disorder that is known as a manic depression illness
due to the intense depression stage bipolar p...
 Symptoms of bipolar specifically depend on
which phase they are in whether its
depression or mania.
 Both phases are co...
 Suicide - > is when someone takes over their
own life
 People who are diagnosed with bipolar have
high rates of suicida...
 Depression is described as a state of prolonged
severe sadness that sometime subside on their
own and sometimes need som...
 Mania -> is the stage in bipolar when the person
is at their highest up rather then lowest down at
depression. Mania usu...
 Bipolar along with many other mental disorders are
becoming more and more prevalent these days.
 There are a lot of peo...
 This theory is concerned with how illnesses effect the way of
how a person can be normally in their social role. A menta...
There are multiple things that could
contribute to bipolar disorder including:
Genetics -> Family history
Biological abn...
 Bipolar type 1 disorder
The most common form of bipolar that you come across. This type
people usually encounter one or ...
 Cyclothymic Disorder -> is known as having less mood swings
that are less severe in depth and length compared to type 1 ...
 Bipolar disorder is said to effect about 2% of the
population
 People who have family members that have bipolar
disorde...
 Help to stabilize the patients moods
to less frequent and less severe
 Assist in the ability to be able to
function dai...
 Medication involving mood
stabilizers, antipsychotics and antidepressants
are also used. Regular visits with the
psychia...
 I truly believe that talking can help a lot of people out
of certain problems. I feel that some people feel that
they ar...
Bernstein, D., Cramer, K.M., Fenwick, K.D., & Fraser, I. (2008).
Psychology (1st Canadian ed.). Psychological Disorders
(p...
Bipolar presentation
Bipolar presentation
Bipolar presentation
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Bipolar presentation

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  1. 1. By: Crystal Stuy
  2. 2.  Mental Health -> “ Successful performance of mental function, resulting in productive activities, fulfilling relationships with other people, and the ability to change and to cope with adversity.”  Mental Illness -> “ Refers collectively to all mental disorders.”  Mental Disorder -> “ A behavioural or psychological syndrome or pattern that occurs in an individual and  that is associated with present distress or disability, or with a significantly increased risk of suffering, death, pain, disability or loss of freedom.” (Holmes, Knox, Mooney, & Schacht, 2013, p. 39).
  3. 3. Bipolar Disorder  Mood disorder that is known as a manic depression illness due to the intense depression stage bipolar people get in  Bipolar is a brain disorder that causes unusual changes in mood, energy , activity levels and the ability to carry out normal every day activities.  Bipolar is different then your usual person who has their good days and their bad. Bipolar disorder moods go from one extreme to the next, really high ups and really low downs  Their downs actually start affecting their everyday living such as their relationships, jobs, and performance in school. These moods even turn so low to the thoughts of suicide. (Bipolar, 2009).
  4. 4.  Symptoms of bipolar specifically depend on which phase they are in whether its depression or mania.  Both phases are completely opposite from an extreme high to and extreme low  Anxiety is common to have with bipolar  Suicidal thoughts are a symptom during the major depression state.
  5. 5.  Suicide - > is when someone takes over their own life  People who are diagnosed with bipolar have high rates of suicidal thoughts  Bipolar people are also likely to abuse alcohol and drugs which could also worsen symptoms and increase the risk suicide.  These thoughts happen because of how severe their phase of depression is and how long they end up staying in that stage.  The state of depression in bipolar is more common then mania (Merrill, 2013).
  6. 6.  Depression is described as a state of prolonged severe sadness that sometime subside on their own and sometimes need some type of support to get passed it. Depression can affect the way a person lives by their lack of motive to want to do anything but sit in isolation alone.  I believe that there are so many issues that could contribute to depression throughout a person’s life growing up  A person may have went through a really bad experience and doesn’t know how to cope or who to talk to about it or maybe doesn’t even have anyone they feel they can trust.  Problems such as stressful situations as in school, work, relations, family, violence, bullying, abuse, or assault of any type can lead someone into a state of depression (Smith, Saisan & Segal, 2014).
  7. 7.  Mania -> is the stage in bipolar when the person is at their highest up rather then lowest down at depression. Mania usually consists of a person being extremely agitated, overjoyed emotional state. This state makes people feel optimistic, energetic, a feeling of having powers or extraordinary abilities. These people with mania are hard to compromise with and become irritated when you try and change their mind or slow them down at what their doing. Mania can cause people to be impulsive and not truly think things through making bad decisions.  Hypomania ->can be hard to determine because its confused with just being in a good mood. (Bernstein, Cramer, Fenwick, & Fraser, 2008).
  8. 8.  Bipolar along with many other mental disorders are becoming more and more prevalent these days.  There are a lot of people including professionals that are not aware of the symptoms and don’t treat these people properly as in they need help  People all over the world have lots of problems that are not diagnosed because they may have had it all their life so they have never noticed a difference.  People think that these mood changes are just who they are and don’t look further into their mood changes  Awareness of mental disorders needs to be known for the safety of the people of our society and so that these people can get the help they need
  9. 9.  This theory is concerned with how illnesses effect the way of how a person can be normally in their social role. A mental disorder such as bipolar effects a person’s ability to think and make decisions.  Society expects that the ill be treated and listen to medical advice and then be able to continue to fulfill normal social role obligations.  Society doesn’t want illnesses to be altering or changing the social norms of society in any way. Even though social changes and norms today is what has a lot to do with why health and illnesses are becoming more and more prevalent.  Alcohol, drugs, medications, smoking, stress and multiple other contributors even marital status is making society have more health issues, including mental disorders.  People have illnesses and continue to reproduce and chance the outcome of passing along that illness that is genetically inherited or an increased risk. (Holmes, Knox, Mooney, & Schacht, 2013).
  10. 10. There are multiple things that could contribute to bipolar disorder including: Genetics -> Family history Biological abnormalities -> Structural difference in parts of the brain Faulty neurotransmitters -> Difficulty in production and function of neurotransmitters (Krucik, 2013).
  11. 11.  Bipolar type 1 disorder The most common form of bipolar that you come across. This type people usually encounter one or more episodes of mania or even mixed episodes. These episodes last longer then your usual ups and downs. Mania in type 1 bipolar disorder can last up to a week or longer, the depressive states can last up to two weeks. Both mania and depression can last up to a month at a time.  Bipolar type 2 disorder Harder to determine rather then type 1 bipolar disorder due to not being able to determine the difference whether their in a state of hypomania or just that their in a good mood . This type of bipolar has more episodes of depression rather then the mania but does still have mania just not as severe lasting only a couple days rather then weeks at a time. Although these episodes are not as long they do still effect functioning on a daily basis. During the times that the patient affected is not in a current stage of mania or depression they have periods of wellness. Since the low of depression is so low in this type of depression suicide is a higher risk. (Bipolar, 2009).
  12. 12.  Cyclothymic Disorder -> is known as having less mood swings that are less severe in depth and length compared to type 1 & 2. This type has rapid mood changes which is more commonly seen when a person is first being diagnosed young having their first episode.  Bipolar Disorder Not Otherwise Specified -> a person falls into this category when they cant be clearly diagnosed to a specific type of bipolar due to not enough symptoms or not often enough or long enough of symptoms.  Rapid-Cycling Bipolar Disorder - > is when a person has rapid mood changes ranging from mania, hypo mania to major depression or even mixed symptoms of these more then four times in a year. (Krucik, 2013).
  13. 13.  Bipolar disorder is said to effect about 2% of the population  People who have family members that have bipolar disorder are at an increased risk of 4-6 times more likely in being diagnosed  Bipolar disorder type 1 is equally affected by both genders where bipolar disorder type 2 has a higher rate affecting women.  People with depression are at a 20% chance of it turning into bipolar disorder within a 5 year period of time  The most common age of diagnoses is around 25yrs or younger accounting for just about half of the diagnosed sufferers. Bipolar can be diagnosed as early as childhood to as late as 50 (Krucik, 2013).
  14. 14.  Help to stabilize the patients moods to less frequent and less severe  Assist in the ability to be able to function daily in normal everyday activities such as work or school  Eliminate thoughts of suicide or self injury (Merrill, 2013).
  15. 15.  Medication involving mood stabilizers, antipsychotics and antidepressants are also used. Regular visits with the psychiatrist are recommended as well to go over treatment  Electroconvulsive Therapy is used to treat either phase of mania or depression. This is more of a last resort when medication is not working.  Support Programs teach new ways of coping with the phases of bipolar and relate to others and not feel alone  Talk Therapies sometimes just having someone to listen is all a person needed (Merrill, 2013).
  16. 16.  I truly believe that talking can help a lot of people out of certain problems. I feel that some people feel that they are alone and are seeking that attention but don’t know where to look for it.  Keeping things built up inside is not good for anyone as it’s a big burden to keep something so big or even small a secret. There’s a sense of relief when you are able to finally tell your story, to let out what has been bugging you, building up inside. These thoughts will only continue to get worse if the person doesn’t know how to cope properly.  Prevention of things is truly key. Everyone should have someone they feel they can turn to and feel that they are comfortable and trusting of them.  I cant imagine being alone, I have a huge support system of family and they are who helps me get through the rough times.  I also think that awareness within the society in being able to recognise a person in need of some type of help and to be approachable to that person. Lend your ear even if its just for a couple minutes to show that person that someone does care even a complete stranger.
  17. 17. Bernstein, D., Cramer, K.M., Fenwick, K.D., & Fraser, I. (2008). Psychology (1st Canadian ed.). Psychological Disorders (pp. 573 – 579). Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin Company Bipolar (2009). Bipolar disorder. Canadian Mental Health Association. Retrieved from http://www.heretohelp.bc.ca/sites/default/files/Bipolar210we b.pdf Holmes, M., Knox, D., Mooney, L., & Schacht, C. (2013). Understanding social problems (Custom ed.). Illness and Health Care (pp. 39 – 42). Toronto, Ontario: Nelson Education Ltd. Krucik, G. (2013). What Do You Want to Know About Bipolar Disorder? Health line. Retrieved from http://www.healthline.com/health/bipolar-disorder Merrill, D.B. (2013). Bipolar disorder. Medline Plus. Retrieved from http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000926.htm Smith, M., Saisan, J., & Segal, J. (2014). Depression symptoms & warning signs. HelpGuide.Org. Retrieved from http://www.helpguide.org/mental/depression_signs_types_dia gnosis_treatment.htm
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