What Works Scojo India Fdn

801 views
711 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
801
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

What Works Scojo India Fdn

  1. 1. WORLD RESOURCES INSTITUTE What Works Case Study WHAT WORKS: SCOJO INDIA FOUNDATION Restoring eyesight in rural India Horace W. Goldsmith through the direct selling of reading glasses Foundation NICO CLEMMINCK SACHIN KADAKIA June 2007
  2. 2.       Support for this Development Through Enterprise  What Works∗ case study provided by:  HORACE W. GOLDSMITH FOUNDATION                                                             ∗   The  Development  Through  Enterprise  What  Works  case  study  series  is  available  for  downloading  at:  http://www.nextbillion.net/resources/casestudies 
  3. 3.         What Works: Scojo India Foundation  Restoring eyesight in rural India   through the direct selling of reading glasses        By:  Nico Clemminck and Sachin Kadakia  Scojo promoters: Graham Macmillan & Neil Blumenthal   ▪   WRI promoter: Julia Tran  The authors would like to thank the management team of Scojo Foundation for their enthusiasm and support in developing this  case study, as well as Molly Christiansen and Ted London of the William Davidson Institute for sharing their unpublished Michigan  Business School teaching case study as a main reference in the preparation of this report.   
  4. 4. Table of Contents i What Works: Scojo India Foundation Table of Contents  Executive summary  1 1.1 Introduction..................................................................................................................................... 1 1.2 Business model................................................................................................................................ 2 1.3 Impact............................................................................................................................................... 4 1.4 What works........................................................................................................................................ 4 Market overview  7 2.1 Geographic distribution................................................................................................................. 7 2.2 Size and demographics .................................................................................................................. 7 2.3 Economic situation ......................................................................................................................... 8 Business model  10 3.1 Founding history........................................................................................................................... 10 3.2 Mission and strategy .................................................................................................................... 12 3.3 Ownership and governance structure ....................................................................................... 12 3.4 Products and services................................................................................................................... 14 3.4.1 Introduction .................................................................................................................. 15 3.4.2 Distribution channels................................................................................................... 16 3.4.3 Pricing and marketing ................................................................................................. 20 Partnership networks  22 4.1 Formulating partnerships............................................................................................................ 22 4.2 Current partners in India............................................................................................................. 24 4.3 Success of partnership strategy................................................................................................... 26  
  5. 5. Table of Contents ii Challenges  28 5.1 Introduction................................................................................................................................... 28 5.2 Partnerships................................................................................................................................... 30 5.3 Recruiting entrepreneurs ............................................................................................................. 31 5.4 Motivating entrepreneurs............................................................................................................ 32 5.5 Market saturation.......................................................................................................................... 33 5.6 Competition ................................................................................................................................... 33 5.6.1 Optical retailers............................................................................................................. 33 5.6.2 Street vendors ............................................................................................................... 34 5.6.3 Existing Indian manufacturers ................................................................................... 34 5.6.4 Charities......................................................................................................................... 35 5.6.5 New entrants................................................................................................................. 35 What works: key lessons learned  36 6.1 Focusing on sustainability and profitability ............................................................................. 36 6.2 Aggressive growth strategy ........................................................................................................ 37 6.3 Building barriers to entry............................................................................................................. 37 6.4 Replicating the model .................................................................................................................. 38 6.5 Delivering social impact .............................................................................................................. 39 6.6 Conclusion ..................................................................................................................................... 39 Board of Directors and Advisors  40 Projected income statement  42 Projected balance sheet  43 List of Figures  44    
  6. 6. Executive summary 1 What Works: Scojo India Foundation Chapter 1   Executive summary  In  this  case  study,  we  examine  Scojo  Foundation  (“Scojo”)1  and  identify  the  key  drivers  that  make  its  social  enterprise  program  successful  in  India.  To  evaluate  Scojo’s  strategy,  we  analyzed  the  business  model,  market  environment,  successes  and  challenges,  potential  replicability  and  scalability  of  the  program.  Our  conclusion,  as  detailed  in  the  final  chapter,  is  that  a  unique  combination  of  carefully  designed organizational and operational strategies is driving Scojo’s widely recognized success.  1.1 Introduction  Presbyopia, or blurry up‐close vision, is a condition that currently affects 700 million people worldwide.  Those  suffering  from  presbyopia  in  the  world’s  poorest  countries  are  faced  with  decreased  job  productivity, diminished quality of life and financial instability. The problem can be solved immediately  with reading glasses, which are readily available in developed countries at pharmacies and corner shops.  However, poor populations in developing countries rarely have this option.  Scojo  has  developed  an  innovative,  market‐based  solution  to  address  this  crucial  public  health  issue.  Scojo trains micro‐franchisees, or ʺVision Entrepreneurs,ʺ to run profitable businesses conducting vision  screenings  within  their  communities,  selling  affordable  reading  glasses  and  referring  those  requiring  advanced  eye  care  to  reputable  clinics.  This  business  model  is  built  on  the  belief  that  the  “base  of  the                                                              1  Refers to the Foundation, both internationally and India, unless otherwise specified.   
  7. 7. Business model 2 What Works: Scojo India Foundation [economic] pyramid”2 is better served when involving some payment, so that products are more highly  valued, costs are covered and programs are financially self‐sustaining.  Since  2002,  Scojo  has  launched  operations  in  India,  Bangladesh,  Mexico,  Guatemala,  El  Salvador  and  Ghana. In the spring of 2007, Scojo Foundation signed an exclusive licensing agreement with Population  Services International (PSI) to make reading glasses available to PSI’s 30 sub‐Saharan country programs  through urban pharmacy stores.  The first countries to start this program  will be Zambia, Tanzania and Ethiopia.    Scojo  India  Foundation,  headquartered  in  Hyderabad,  is  the  largest  and  fastest  growing  operation  today  due  primarily  to  strategic  investments,  strong networks and rapid replication of the business model by local staff.  Scojo  began  operations  in  India  by  training  and  supporting  Vision  Entrepreneurs in a proprietary distribution network. However, recent and  future growth is being driven by franchise partners, which have integrated  the Scojo model into their existing rural networks. These partnerships have  greatly  reduced  expansion  costs  and  have  added  both  profit  and  social  value to the program.  1.2 Business model  Since the launch of the India program in January 2005, Scojo has sold  Scojo’s mission is to improve the economic condition of more than 50,000 pairs of glasses, and is targeting cumulative sales of  families in the developing world by broadening the availability of one  million  pairs  by  2010  and  ten  million  by  2016.  To  date,  the  India  reading glasses and other program has trained 457 Vision Entrepreneurs through its proprietary  health products and services through Scojo entrepreneurs network  and  twenty  franchise  partners.  Scojo  currently  employs  16  and other market-based distribution solutions. people:  seven  managers,  seven  district  coordinators  and  two                                                              2 “Base of the pyramid,” or BOP, is a concept developed by Drs. C.K. Prahalad, Stuart Hart, and Allen Hammond to refer to the 4  billion people whose incomes place them in the lowest level of the world’s income distribution.  Implicit in the term’s usage is that  engaging  with  these  4  billion  people  as  consumers  and  producers  and  through  the  right  business  models  could  yield  significant  financial and social returns. For more information, refer to publications listed at: http://www.nextbillion.net/resources/.   
  8. 8. Business model 3 What Works: Scojo India Foundation administrative staff.  The  dual  objectives  articulated  in  Scojo’s  mission  form  the  basis  of  its  business  model.  As  a  primary  objective,  the  micro‐franchise  strategy  enables  low‐income  entrepreneurs  to  generate  income  by  selling  glasses in their communities. Secondarily, Scojo aims to broaden the availability of eye care products by  distributing them in the most efficient and sustainable manner.   To  implement  its  mission,  Scojo  trains  local  community  members  to  become  Vision  Entrepreneurs  and  provides them with a supply of reading glasses, related accessories, and materials to run their business.  In addition to building its own distribution network, Scojo works with strategic partners that recruit and  support  Vision  Entrepreneurs  through  their  social  and  business  networks.  As  such,  Scojo  helps  to  develop rural infrastructure while achieving its dual mission.  The  business  model  is  designed  to  be  financially  self‐sustainable,  by  generating  profits  at  every  step  of  the  value  chain.  In  India,  each  pair  of  glasses,  which  Scojo  imports  for  about  $1,  is  supplied  to  micro‐ franchisees for about $2 and sold to customers at a retail price of about $3 or roughly 10% of the average  customer’s monthly income. This financial structure is a core driver of Scojo’s success. The $1 gross profit  to Scojo will cover its overhead expenses once it achieves its volume targets in 2010. The $1 gross profit to  Vision  Entrepreneurs  offers  a  higher  margin  than  most  other  retail  products  and  substantially  adds  to  their household income.  Scojo Foundation Entrepreneur Customers receive Manufacturer ~$1 Gross Profit: ~$2 Gross Profit: ~$3 high-quality, low- $1/pair $1/pair cost eyeglasses   This model has several key benefits compared to a traditional charity model. By making customers pay  for eyeglasses, customers ascribe greater value to them and are more likely to wear them. This market‐ based  model  also  incentivizes  the  producer  and  distributors  to  improve  product  design  and  quality  continuously  to  meet  customer  preferences.  In  addition,  Scojo’s  model  provides  adequate  financial  incentive  for  the  distribution  network  to  sustain  the  program,  versus  community  health  workers  constantly  hindered  by  limited  resources.  Most  importantly,  this  model  is  the  only  means  to  raise  sufficient capital to help solve this widespread problem.   
  9. 9. Impact 4 What Works: Scojo India Foundation 1.3 Impact  To measure its impact on livelihoods in India, Scojo identified a number  Since inception, Scojo India of  operating  and  social  indicators.  The  primary  operating  metric  –  has sold more than 50,000 pairs of glasses and number of glasses sold – has grown rapidly, albeit unevenly, in the past  employed more than 450 two  years  (Figure  1).  Number  of  Vision  Entrepreneurs  employed,  Vision Entrepreneurs. average  incremental  monthly  income  from  Scojo,  and  number  of  people  receiving  eyeglasses,  measure  the primary social impact. The number of Vision Entrepreneurs has grown dramatically, due in large part  to  more  than  20  strategic  partnerships,  including  multi‐national  corporations,  micro‐credit  institutions,  health organizations and consumer products distributors (Figure 2).  On  average,  Vision  Entrepreneurs  allocate  20‐30  hours  per  month  to  the  Scojo  program  and  earn  approximately  $15‐20  per  month.  As  many  participants  had  previously  earned  $1/day,  the  potential  to  boost their income while also serving the community is an attractive prospect.  Num ber of glasses sold Num ber of Vision Entrepreneurs em ployed Scojo VE's Partner VE's 10,000 9,313 500 8,000 6,777 400 5,797 6,000 300 331 3,710 4,000 3,287 260 2,019 200 179 2,000 148 1,171 1,191 100 53 0 111 126 93 102 Q1 2005 Q2 2005 Q3 2005 Q4 2005 Q1 2006 Q2 2006 Q3 2006 Q4 2006 78 30 46 24 0 Q1 2005 Q2 2005 Q3 2005 Q4 2005 Q1 2006 Q2 2006 Q3 2006 Q4 2006   Figure 1: Growth in number of glasses sold  Figure 2: Growth in Vision Entreprenuers    1.4 What works  Scojo’s  innovative  business  model  has  enabled  the  organization  to  scale  its  operations  quickly  and  efficiently. The implementation of this model has worked particularly well due to the following factors:   • Focusing on sustainability and profitability from the earliest stages. Scojo’s programs were  designed  and  are  presently  evaluated  on  a  double  bottom  line:  organizational  profitability   
  10. 10. What works 5 What Works: Scojo India Foundation and  social  impact.  The  value  chain  emphasizes  this  mission,  creating  sustainable  profits  at  each  stage  of  the  process. With  this  model, Scojo  expects  to  achieve  sufficient  volume  to  be  profitable by 2010.  • Aggressive growth strategy. This business model requires efficiencies of scale in order to be  profitable,  and  Scojo  has  aggressively  expanded  its  network  of  Vision  Entrepreneurs.  In  addition  to  its  own  distribution  network,  leveraging  existing  networks  developed  by  other  organizations  in  concentrated  geographic  regions  has  provided  Scojo  a  faster  and  substantially less expensive expansion strategy.  • Building  barriers  to  entry.  With  its  first  mover  advantage,  Scojo  has  built  barriers  to  entry  for  potential competitors. No other organization (to  our  knowledge)  sells  eyeglasses  at  the  village  level,  and  the  cost  has  historically  been  prohibitive. Scojo has developed a strong brand  in  the  markets  it  serves,  as  a  reliable,  high‐ quality product and service provider, which is a  key  decision  factor  for  the  rural  poor.  As  Scojo  aggressively  continues  to  expand  its  distribution  and  build  its  brand,  it  will  be  even  more  difficult for new entrants to penetrate the rural market.  • Developing  a  replicable  model.  Scojo’s  model  has  been  replicated  in  six  states  in  India,  through  a  broad  range  of  remote  villages  with  diverse  cultures,  economic  conditions  and  geographic  considerations.  A  key  driver  for  this  rapid  growth  is  the  minimal  impact  of  region‐specific factors on its success. The problem of presbyopia affects every person over the  age of 35 to 40, irrespective of region, culture or economic conditions. Even literacy rates do  not appear to have a significant impact, because Scojo’s glasses are used for sewing, cooking,  farming and other necessary daily tasks.  • Delivering  social  impact.  Scojo  delivers  social  impact  through  economic  empowerment  of  entrepreneurs  and  their  customers,  many  whom  previously  earned  less  than  $1  per  day.   
  11. 11. What works 6 What Works: Scojo India Foundation These entrepreneurs substantially boost their income by selling a high‐margin product with a  large  market  demand.  The  Vision  Entrepreneurs’  customers,  people  suffering  from  presbyopia, receive a low‐cost solution in the convenience of their own villages.  With newly‐ corrected  up‐close  vision,  weavers,  farmers,  tailors,  artisans  and  other  professionals  who  require  the  ability  to  see up  close  benefit  greatly.    Many  customers  are able  to  double  their  productivity (output) and also double their working lives.  Furthermore, customers no longer  require  the  assistance  of  younger  family  members  to  help  with  tasks  that  require  close‐up  vision (e.g, threading needles, separating stones from rice) thereby freeing up younger family  members to work on other tasks.     
  12. 12. Market overview 7 What Works: Scojo India Foundation Chapter 2  Market overview  Over  the  past  five  years,  Scojo  has  launched  operations  in  India,  Bangladesh,  Mexico,  Guatemala,  El  Salvador, Mexico, and Ghana. Scojo India Foundation is the largest and fastest growing operation today.  In this chapter, we will present an overview of the Indian market and discuss its specific challenges.  2.1 Geographic distribution  Scojo Foundation launched Scojo India Foundation in January 2005. From its headquarters in Hyderabad,  Scojo currently trains and supports Vision Entrepreneurs in five districts in Andhra Pradesh. In addition,  Scojo is active in five other states of India through strategic partnerships: Madhya Pradesh, Assam, Bihar,  Rajasthan and Uttar Pradesh. In these partnerships, Scojo provides the training, technical assistance and  eyeglasses,  and  partners  recruit  and  support  Vision  Entrepreneurs  directly.  The  nature  of  these  partnerships will be discussed in more detail in Chapter 4.  2.2 Size and demographics  Scojo estimates that approximately 250 million people in India currently do not have access to affordable  near‐vision eyeglasses and could benefit from readymade reading glasses. As shown in Figure 3, Scojo’s  potential  customer  base  includes  anyone  over  the  age  of  35  with  symptoms  of  presbyopia.  This  base  incorporates  certain  individuals  who  also  exhibit  other  refractive  errors  such  as  mild  astigmatism,  myopia, or hyperopia, since readymade reading glasses will improve their ability to see up close. Note   
  13. 13. Economic situation 8 What Works: Scojo India Foundation from  Figure  3  that  more  than  75%  of  these  potential  customers  are  located  in  rural  communities.  Furthermore, it is estimated that 80% of the Indian population, or approximately 825 million, live on less  than $2 per day.3     Market size India (Millions) Market size Andhra Pradesh (Millions) 1,200 80 75.7 1,027.0 70 1,000 60 800 50 600 40 30 22.7 400 308.1 246.5 246.5 18.2 18.2 184.9 20 13.6 200 61.6 10 4.6 0 0 Total population Population over Population that Total potential Rural customers Urban Total population Population over Population that Total potential Rural customers Urban age of 35 benefits from customers customers age of 35 benefits from customers customers reading glasses reading glasses   Figure 3: Potential customer base in India and Andhra Pradesh  2.3 Economic situation  Unfortunately, the rural population has limited access to professional eye care. Scojo estimates that there  is  an  average  of  one  eye  care  professional  per  30,200  people  in  India.  The  Around one quarter of the Indian majority of these professionals are in urban areas, which only constitute 25%  population would benefit from reading of  the  target  market  for  reading  glasses.  Furthermore,  consulting  urban  glasses in terms of professionals is too expensive for the Indian rural population, with the total  improved quality of life and increased cost for such a visit varying “between Rs. 250 and 500 (US$6–11)”4 according  productivity. to Scojo’s estimates.  Primary  research  conducted  by  Scojo  in  2002  indicates  two  main  reasons  for  the  lack  of  availability  of  ready‐made reading glasses:  • Undeveloped  industry.  Less  than  5%  of  the  existing  eyeglass  manufacturing  business  is  focused  on  readymade  reading  glasses.  Manufacturers  lack  the  technology  and  expertise  to                                                              3  Population Reference Bureau. “2006 World Population Data Sheet.” http://www.prb.org/pdf06/06WorldDataSheet.pdf.  4 Christiansen, Molly and Ted London, “Scojo Foundation: A Vision for Growth at the Base of the Pyramid” (unpublished teaching  case study, University of Michigan, 2007), 6.   
  14. 14. Economic situation 9 What Works: Scojo India Foundation produce  high  quality  frames  that  compete  effectively  on  a  price  and  quality  basis  with  Chinese imports. Therefore, retailers focus on more expensive, custom‐made eyeglasses.  • Profitability.  The  price  of  the  least  expensive  reading  spectacles  at  optician  shops  averages  $8,  and  although  low‐quality,  plastic‐frame  options  are  available  for  as  low as  $3,  opticians  do not earn enough profit on the latter to stock them.5  Consequently,  many  people  do  not  know  that  there  is  a  simple  and  affordable  solution  to  presbyopia,  and therefore do not look for opportunities to buy reading glasses even if they are available. Scojo India  Foundation,  therefore,  stimulates  demand  in  this  market  by  generating  awareness  of  blurry  up‐close  vision and the need for reading glasses.                                                              5  Arunesh Singh, interview by Nico Clemminck and Sachin Kadakia, Hyderabad, India, January 2007.   
  15. 15. Business model 10 What Works: Scojo India Foundation Chapter 3  Business model  In  this  chapter,  we  provide  an  overview  of  Scojo  as  an  organization  and  analyze  the  unique  characteristics  of  its  business  model.  Primarily,  the  model  employs  a  distinctive  distribution  system  through  the  promotion  of  local  entrepreneurship  supported  internally  or  by  strategic  partners.  In  addition, the model emphasizes long‐term self‐sustainability through its marketing and pricing strategy.  3.1 Founding history  Dr. Jordan Kassalow and Scott Berrie drew on their experiences in medicine and business, respectively, to  create Scojo Foundation in 2001. Both founders believed in making affordable reading glasses available to  low‐income populations through market‐based delivery models.  Kassalow and Berrie established Scojo  Foundation in conjunction with the company Scojo Vision LLC, a for‐profit designer and manufacturer of   high‐end reading glasses which caters to customers in high‐income countries.  Scojo Vision donates 5%6  of all its profits to Scojo Foundation.  Scojo Foundation piloted its direct selling model in India, in 2001, and has since expanded operations into  El  Salvador,  Guatemala,  Bangladesh,  Mexico,  Ghana,7  and  most  recently  in  2007,  Sub‐Saharan  Africa.8                                                               6  Scojo Foundation. “Mission and Vision,” http://www.scojofoundation.org/2_1_mission.html.  7  Graham Macmillan, interview by Nico Clemminck and Sachin Kadakia, New York, NY, October 2006.   
  16. 16. Founding history 11 What Works: Scojo India Foundation Scojo  distributes  glasses  through  differing  subsidiary  and  partnership  arrangements  adapted  to  local  market conditions. Only in India and El Salvador does Scojo operate wholly‐owned subsidiaries.  United States Legal Entity: Scojo Foundation, Inc. US non-profit - 501(c)(3) public charity Key Staff: Graham Macmillan, Director Neil Blumenthal, Director of Programs Guatemala El Salvador Program Type: Franchise partner Program Type: Subsidiary; Year Started: 2004 Year Started: 2002 Legal Entity: Community Enterprise Solutions (US Legal Entity: Scojo El Salvador, S.A. non-profit 501(c)(3) public charity) (Salvadoran For-profit Sociedad Anónima) Funding: Scojo Foundation makes grants to CES to Key Staff: Heidy Serpas, Country Manager manage program and purchase inventory George “Bucky” Glickley, Consultant Bangladesh India Program Type: Franchise partner Program Type: Subsidiary that also supports franchise Year Started: 2006 partners; Year Started: 2005 Legal Entity: BRAC (Bangladeshi non-profit) Legal Entity: Scojo India Foundation Funding: Scojo Foundation makes grants to BRAC to (Indian Non-profit Section 25 Company) manage program and purchase inventory Key Staff: Arunesh Singh, Country Director Raman Nageswara, Operations & Programs Mexico Ghana Program Type: Franchise partner Program Type: Franchise partner Year Started: 2006 Year Started: 2007 Legal Entity: One Roof (US for-profit with for-profit Legal Entity: Freedom from Hunger (US non- subsidiary in Mexico) profit 501(c)(3) public charity) Funding: One Roof paid Scojo Foundation to conduct Funding: Freedom from Hunger paid Scojo a feasibility study and pilot Foundation to conduct a feasibility study and pilot   Figure 4: Overview of Scojo operations in different geographies9                                                                                                                                                                                              8 Scojo Foundation. “Scojo Foundation and PSI Collaborate to Launch Pan‐Africa Reading Glasses Initiative.”  http://www.scojofoundation.org/5_p_psi.html.  9  Christiansen and London, “Scojo Foundation,” 15.   
  17. 17. Mission and strategy 12 What Works: Scojo India Foundation Scojo Foundation’s partnership arrangements with existing distribution networks allow greater reach into  low‐income  communities  using  a  minimum  of  resources.  Scojo  partners  with  a  wide  variety  of  organizations, including BRAC, a microfinance institution, Drishtee, a for‐profit Internet provider to rural  India, and Peace Corps, a US government sponsored volunteer program.10  Scojo Foundation has received numerous honors and awards, including the “World Bank’s Development  Marketplace Award in 2003, Yale/Goldman Sachs Foundation Partnership on Nonprofit Venture Award  in  2003,  New  York  University’s  Stewart  Satter  Social  Entrepreneur  of  the  Year  Award  in  2006,  Fast  Company  magazine’s  Social  Capitalist  Award  in  2005  and  2007,”11  and  Brigham  Young  University’s  Social Innovator of the Year in 2006.  3.2 Mission and strategy  Scojo’s  mission  states  that  it  “improves  the  economic  condition  of  The dual goals articulated families  in  the  developing  world  by  broadening  the  availability  of  in this mission, broadening availability of health care reading glasses and other health products and services and achieving  products and enabling this through Scojo entrepreneurs and other market‐based distribution  entrepreneurship, are being carefully balanced by the solutions.”  The  dual  goal  articulated  in  this  mission,  broadening  organization. availability of health care products on the one hand and enabling entrepreneurship on the other, is being  carefully balanced by the organization. Currently, Scojo is focusing on enabling entrepreneurship in order  to  build  scale  and  prove  the  model  sufficiently.    As  such,  Scojo  is  putting  its  emphasis  on  building  the  organization aggressively by training Vision Entrepreneurs and formulating strategic partnerships.  3.3 Ownership and governance structure  Scojo is a 501(c)3, non‐profit organization governed by a Board of Directors, which includes Dr. Jordan  Kassalow (Chairman and Co‐Founder), Scott Berrie (President and Co‐Founder), David Bornstein, Anne  Marie Burgoyne, Charles DeGunzberg, Paul Lambert, and Ken Schwartz.                                                              10  Scojo Foundation. “Partners.” http://www.scojofoundation.org/2_3_partners.html.  11  Christiansen and London, “Scojo Foundation,” 3.   
  18. 18. Ownership and governance structure 13 What Works: Scojo India Foundation Scojo Board of Directors and senior management are supported by a Board of Advisors with expertise in  many of the areas of Scojo Foundation’s work. Please see Appendix A for a complete list of Directors and  Advisors. Figure 5 provides an overview of Scojo Foundation’s organizational structure.  Board of Directors Chairman Board of Advisors Dr. Jordan Kassalow Director Graham Macmillan Director of Programs Neil Blument hal El Salvador Country Guatemala India Country Bangladesh Mexico Ghana Manager : Heidy Serpas Partner: CES Director : Arunesh Singh Partner: BRAC Partner : One Partner: Freedom Roof From Hunger Operations & Programs Programs ManagerManager Rama n Nageswara Raman Nageswara Key Accounts Training Manager VE Channel Finance/Accounting Admin/Stock Assistant Manager (Franchise Manager David Tadikonda Partner and Wholesale Franchise Partner Partner Praveen Kumar Channel) Channel Maruti Ram Salu Cherian Salu Cherian Krishna Kakani VE Identification and Training Managers District (2) Coordinators (6) (7) Vision Entrepreneurs   Figure 5: Scojo Foundation organization chart12  Scojo employs 16 people in India: Arunesh Singh as Country Director, six Managers, two administrative  staff and seven District Coordinators.   Mr. Singh brings to Scojo extensive experience in social enterprise                                                              12  Scojo Foundation, business plan submitted to Acumen Fund (2006), quoted in Christiansen and London , “Scojo Foundation,” 17.   
  19. 19. Products and services 14 What Works: Scojo India Foundation management  as  a  former  Program  Director  with  Appropriate  Technology  India,13  an  organization  that  promotes environmentally sustainable work alternatives to subsistence agriculture.14  Scojo  New  York  is  involved  in  nearly  all  aspects  of  Scojo  India  Foundation’s  activities.  These  include  recruiting  an  experienced  Indian  management  team;  identifying  and  securing  funding  and  investors;  providing technical assistance in sales, marketing, and product design; partnership‐building with Indian  NGOs  and  government;  ongoing  monitoring  and  evaluation  of  operations  through  quarterly  visits,  weekly  conference  calls  and  monthly  progress  reports  submitted  by  Scojo  India  Foundation’s  management; annual site visits to India by Scojo directors; and strict financial monitoring via internal and  external controls and audits.  3.4 Products and services  Scojo  trains  rural  community  members  to  become  Vision  Entrepreneurs,  capable  of  providing  vision  screenings  and  identifying  common  eye  conditions.  The  vision  screening  enables  Vision  Entrepreneurs  to  refer  all  customers  with  eye  conditions  other  than  presbyopia  to  reputable  partner  eye  clinics  to  receive  comprehensive  eye  care.  For  customers  with  presbyopia,  Vision  Entrepreneurs  are  able  to  assess  the correct magnification required and provide ready‐ made reading glasses on the spot.  Scojo  provides  the  Vision  Entrepreneurs  with  a  kit  including  multiple  styles,  colors,  and  powers  of  reading  glasses,  screening  equipment  and  marketing  materials  to  help  launch  their  business.  After  the  launch, Scojo replenishes supplies of reading glasses and provides additional support as required.                                                              13  Scojo Foundation. “Founders and Staff.” http://www.scojofoundation.org/2_2_founders.html.  14  Appropriate Technology India. “Home.” http://www.atindia.org/.   
  20. 20. Products and services 15 What Works: Scojo India Foundation Behind this seemingly simple model, however, is an innovative way of dealing with distribution channels  and a refined strategy in setting prices and marketing the product.   3.4.1 Introduction  Scojo  seeks  to  improve  livelihoods  in  the  developing  world  by  broadening  the  availability  of  over‐the‐ counter  eye  health  products  and  services  through  market‐based  distribution  solutions.  Scojo  utilizes  a  micro‐franchise model to enable low‐income entrepreneurs, both male and female, to realize significant  income  by  selling  glasses  in  their  communities.  Scojo  has  grown  its  number  of  Vision  Entrepreneurs  steadily over the last two years (Figure 6).  Num ber of Scojo VE's 140 126 120 111 102 100 93 78 80 60 46 40 30 24 20 0 Q1 2005 Q2 2005 Q3 2005 Q4 2005 Q1 2006 Q2 2006 Q3 2006 Q4 2006   Figure 6: Historical growth of Scojo Vision Entrepreneurs  In addition, Scojo has increasingly been broadening access to affordable reading glasses by working with  strategic  partners  that  recruit  and  support  Vision  Entrepreneurs  in  their  networks.  As  such,  Scojo  leverages access to its partners’ distribution networks in order to meet its dual mission. This partnership   channel  has  significantly  increased  in  importance  since  the  end  of  2005  and  has  currently  outgrown  Scojo’s own distribution channel (Figure 7).   
  21. 21. Products and services 16 What Works: Scojo India Foundation Num ber of Partner VE's 350 331 300 260 250 200 179 148 150 100 53 50 0 0 0 0 Q1 2005 Q2 2005 Q3 2005 Q4 2005 Q1 2006 Q2 2006 Q3 2006 Q4 2006   Figure 7: Historical growth of Partner Vision Entrepreneurs  Scojo currently employs the following strategies to ensure program success:  • Identify  local  entrepreneurs  or  partners  (including  eye  hospitals/clinics,  consumer  products  distributors, micro‐credit institutions and other NGOs) who have demonstrated success.  • With  partners,  systematically  select  entrepreneurs  who  will  be  able  to  sell  glasses  in  their  community  and  advocate  for  improved  eye  health.    Also,  establish  a  referral  hospital  for  people with other vision disorders.  • Provide  entrepreneurs  and  partners  training  and  marketing  support  with  co‐branded  business packs including backpacks, display boxes, screening materials, certificate, lab coats,  posters, and advertising campaigns, to kick‐start their businesses.  • Assist  entrepreneurs  and  partners  during  business  operations  by  offering  continuous  training, procurement of affordable reading glasses, and ancillary eye care products.  • Implement integrated supply‐chain management to ensure timely and cost‐effective delivery  of reading glasses and other associated products.  3.4.2 Distribution channels  Scojo distributes reading glasses through three channels: Scojo Vision Entrepreneurs, Franchise Partners,  and Wholesale (Figure 8).   
  22. 22. Products and services 17 What Works: Scojo India Foundation   Figure 8: Overview of the three main distribution channels15  In the last two years, the franchise partnership channel has significantly increased in importance (Figure  9). As will be discussed later, we expect it to continue to grow in importance.  Num ber of glasses sold Scojo VE's Franchise Partners Wholesale 10,000 41 8,000 602 6,000 7,470 258 4,000 4,725 3,890 689 2,243 2,000 1,127 2,019 1,802 1,649 1,171 1,191 1,450 1,471 1,467 0 Q1 2005 Q2 2005 Q3 2005 Q4 2005 Q1 2006 Q2 2006 Q3 2006 Q4 2006   Figure 9: Number of glasses sold in different distribution channels  Scojo Vision Entrepreneur Channel  The Scojo Vision Entrepreneur (“SVE”) channel is the oldest channel and exists in five districts of Andhra  Pradesh.  In  this  channel,  Scojo  staff  identifies,  recruits,  trains,  and  supports  its  own  network  of  Vision  Entrepreneurs. In essence, each entrepreneur is a Scojo micro‐franchisee.                                                              15 Christiansen and London , “Scojo Foundation,” 21.   
  23. 23. Products and services 18 What Works: Scojo India Foundation When selecting SVEs, it is important to Scojo that the entrepreneur has 1) an adequate education level to  allow him to run a business; 2) a good reputation and connections within the community to provide him  with a solid customer base; and 3) a need for higher income to motivate entrepreneurialism. 16  Scojo provides each SVE with a business‐in‐a‐bag for a non‐refundable and below‐cost deposit of Rs. 500  (USD  $11.11).  This  business‐in‐a‐bag  (Figure  10)  contains  all  the  materials  and  information  necessary  to  start a successful business selling reading glasses.    Figure 10: Example of a Scojo business‐in‐a‐bag17  In addition to the business‐in‐a‐bag, a dedicated Scojo trainer provides all SVEs with business and optical  education  to  ensure  that  SVEs  will  be  able  to:  identify  potential  customers;  conduct  screenings  for  presbyopia;  prescribe  reading  glasses;  and  manage  their  business  and  inventory.    SVEs  also  learn  to  recognize conditions that require medical treatment, such as cataracts, and refer the afflicted individual to  a clinic.18                                                              16  Arunesh Singh, interview by Nico Clemminck and Sachin Kadakia, Hyderabad, India, January 2007.  17  Christiansen and London, “Scojo Foundation,” 16.  18  Arunesh  Singh  and  Neil  Blumenthal,  “Scojo  Vision  Entrepreneur  Training  Program,”  a  Microsoft  PowerPoint  presentation  transmitted via email, May 14, 2007.   
  24. 24. Products and services 19 What Works: Scojo India Foundation A  Scojo  District  Coordinator,  who  is  responsible  for  distributing  In the proprietary Scojo Vision Entrepreneur inventory,  collecting  data,  managing  implementation,  and  providing  Channel, Scojo staff identifies, recruits, trains, moral  support,  supports  each  SVE.  In  general,  a  District  Coordinator  and supports its own supports  20‐25  SVEs  in  a  given  sales  territory.    While  the  cost  per  network of Vision Entrepreneurs. In essence, beneficiary  is  highest  with  this  channel  due  to  staff  and  training  costs,  each entrepreneur is a Scojo franchise. the cost is justified because this channel acts as a test market for the rest  of the country. Scojo is able to control all of the activities in this channel,  learns lessons rapidly and proposes innovations to improve effectiveness.  Each  District  Coordinator  aggregates  sales  information  and  supply  requirements  for  their  respective  region and sends the information to Scojo, often electronically through the SalesForce web‐based software  application.    Scojo  maintains  a  central  warehouse  at  its  Hyderabad  headquarters  for  processing  and  shipping  orders  to  each  District  Coordinator.    The  District  Coordinator  receives  the  shipment  (via  standard  commercial  shipping  companies  or  local  couriers)  and  distributes  the  supplies  to  their  VEs  during their regular visits.  In most cases, Scojo can re‐stock a VE through this distribution system within  1.5 days.  Franchise Partner Channel  Scojo Foundation’s primary growth strategy is based on cultivating partnerships with organizations that  have ready‐built distribution channels into rural areas.  Such partnerships have proven highly beneficial  for both Scojo and its partners: Scojo is able to minimize the costs of expanding its business, not having to  expend  resources  toward  managing  individual  entrepreneurs;  and  partners  are  able  to  offer  their  members an additional income earning opportunity with potentially high profit margins.  Scojo provides  initial training to entrepreneurs, while partners provide day‐to‐day support and inventory management.   Replenishment  of  supplies  is  managed  similarly  to  the  Scojo  VE  channel:  supplies  are  shipped  from  Hyderabad to an appointed District Coordinator‐equivalent staff member who ensures each VE receives  the  stock.    Scojo  charges  partner  organizations  varying  upfront  amounts  for  each  business‐in‐a‐bag,   
  25. 25. Products and services 20 What Works: Scojo India Foundation depending on the number of glasses in the starter kit.  Partners then determine whether and how much to  charge its members for the kits. 19  In  2006,  Scojo  realized  great  success  with  its  initial  partners  by  delivering  more  than  20,000  pairs  of  glasses in nine months. The reason for this rapid growth can be attributed to the partners’ large existing  networks  of  community‐based  providers  such  as  community  health  workers,  consumer  products  distributors,  and  micro‐credit  borrowers.  These  community‐based  providers  represent  the  “last‐mile  solution” that is the most difficult aspect of rural distribution. In addition, each network is supported by  infrastructure  that  is  able  to  manage  the  operations  of  the  Scojo  model.  From  a  revenue  perspective,  Scojo’s  revenue  is  diversified  because  partners  pay  for  the  Scojo  “franchise,”  which  includes  the  inventory, use of brand, marketing materials, eye charts, and data collection forms. In the next chapter,  we  will  discuss  this  franchise  partner  channel  in  more  detail  as  a  major  growth  driver  for  Scojo  India  Foundation.  Wholesale Channel  The  “wholesale”  channel  represents  Scojo’s  effort  to  develop  the  market  for  reading  glasses  in  India  through  commercial  retailers.  Scojo  intends  to  wholesale  affordable,  quality  reading  glasses  to  existing  pharmacy retailers, so that they are widely available. Scojo is well‐aware, however, of the need to ensure  that its wholesaling business is in line with its mission to serve the rural poor.20  3.4.3 Pricing and marketing  Scojo  determined  its  pricing  structure  based  on  sales  data  from  current  operations,  a  market  study  conducted  by  Marketing  and  Research  Team  (MART),  and  the  Scojo  pilot  program  conducted  in  2001.   Scojo offers four models of reading glasses through its retail channel, and relatively more stylish models  are more expensive.  Glasses retail from Rs. 95 to Rs. 165 ($2.11 to $3.67) and earn the VE an average of                                                              19  Arunesh Singh, interview by Nico Clemminck and Sachin Kadakia, Hyderabad, India, January 2007.  20  Christiansen and London, “Scojo Foundation, 12.   
  26. 26. Products and services 21 What Works: Scojo India Foundation Rs. 50 ($1.11) per pair.21  Demonstrating the fact that style is an important consideration for consumers of  any income level, the least expensive model accounts for only 3% of sales.  Prices  to  end  customers  through  the  wholesale  channel are  generally  higher than  through  the  SVE  and  Franchise  Partner  channels,  as  those  who  have  access  to  existing  retailers  are  usually  higher  income  earners.  Two models are available to wholesale buyers, one of which retails for Rs. 105 and the other for  Rs. 199.  The average margin for the wholesaler is Rs. 94 ($2.09) per pair of glasses.22  In its VE channel, Scojo relies on two marketing techniques for selling its glasses: eye camps and door‐to‐ door sales. VEs organize eye camps in coordination with the local village head, who provides VEs with  access to a room centrally located in the village. The Scojo VE, with the help of the District Coordinator,  uses this room as a screening and selling location for half a day, and people from the village can walk in  for  a  complimentary  vision  screening  and  buy  glasses  if  needed.  Often,  the  VE  would  engage  the  local  town drummer to advertise these eye camps a couple days in advance.23  Scojo’s door‐to‐door sales strategy relies on a referral scheme by which the Scojo VE would screen a local  at  his  or  her  home  and  ask  for  referrals  who  might  suffer  from  up‐close  vision  problems.    The  referral  scheme helps to establish trust between the VE and potential customers, especially when the VE begins  by screening a village leader, or when the entrepreneur has earned credibility as a physical examiner by  making a sale to a relative of the referral.24  Vision  Entrepreneurs  have  observed  that  the  door‐to‐door  strategy  is  more  profitable  compared  to  the  eye camps, as the likelihood of a sale is higher.                                                                21  “Scojo 2006 model 01.04.06 2006,” Microsoft Excel file from Scojo Headquarters, New York, NY, October 2006.  22  Christiansen and London, “Scojo Foundation, 12.  23  Scojo Vision Entrepreneurs, anecdote from village visit by Nico Clemminck and Sachin Kadakia, Hyderabad, India, January 2007.  24  Ibid.   
  27. 27. Partnership networks 22 What Works: Scojo India Foundation Chapter 4  Partnership networks  Scojo’s  partnership  objective  is  to  leverage  existing  networks  and  infrastructure  to  create  sustainable,  scalable  programs  that  bring  eyeglasses  to  the  largest  number  of  people.  Partnerships  enable  Scojo  to  share  the  cost  and  resource  commitment  for  recruiting,  training  and  supporting  entrepreneurs.  This  strategy  also  diversifies  the  organization’s  operations  and  income  sources,  while  increasing  its  reach.  Partnerships are a critical component to the efficient deployment of Scojo’s business model and expected  to  be  the  largest  driver  of  its  future  growth.    As  such,  it  is  important  for  Scojo  to  demonstrate  a  clear    financial and social value proposition to each partner.  4.1 Formulating partnerships  Scojo  partners  with  organizations  that  demonstrate  a  commitment  to  their  mission,  support  rural  networks  in  villages,  are  well  respected  in  their  communities  and  have  the  potential  to  make  a  meaningful impact on behalf of Scojo.  Partnerships  begin  with  a  carefully  designed  pilot  phase  to  Scojo partners demonstrate a commitment to their mission, provide  proof  of  concept  for  the  partner  before  a  full  program  support rural networks in villages, and are well respected rollout.  To  date,  most  partnership  pilots  have  been  converted  in their communities. successfully to full programs. Scojo and the partner jointly review  the pilot results and make necessary adjustments to training, support or startup kits. Based on estimated  overhead costs, each partner individually decides how to structure profit sharing agreements with their   
  28. 28. Formulating partnerships 23 What Works: Scojo India Foundation respective  entrepreneurs.  Finally,  prior  to  launch,  each  organization  agrees  to  their  roles  and  commitments, ensuring smooth cooperation with Scojo. However, Scojo has little recourse if partners do  not honor their commitments.  In each partnership, Scojo commits to:  • Assess the feasibility of the program within the partner’s network.  • Provide  the  project  template,  including  protocols  for  training,  loans,  selection  of  entrepreneurs,  data  collection  and  reporting,  marketing,  inventory  management  and  management of the project.  • Assist in start‐up and implementation of the project, including training.  • Identify and secure a reliable source of high quality, low‐cost reading glasses.  • Provide ongoing technical assistance to project staff.  In return, the partner is expected to:  • Identify local staff to oversee and coordinate the project.  • Identify local low‐income entrepreneurs to participate in the project.  • Pay the upfront cost of the micro‐franchise kits (e.g., business‐in‐a‐bag or kiosk displays).  • Provide local oversight of the project.  • Incorporate the project into the organization’s ongoing activities.  • Provide weekly data reports to Scojo on sales.  • Provide monthly narratives and financial progress reports to Scojo.  • Absorb ongoing project costs as the project increases in size.         
  29. 29. Current partners in India 24 What Works: Scojo India Foundation 4.2 Current partners in India  Scojo currently works with over 20 operational partners in India, including multi‐national corporations,  micro‐credit  institutions,  health  organizations  and  consumer  products  distributors.  Utilizing  these  networks, Scojo has been able to expand to five additional states in India.  Consequently,  Scojo  currently  operates  in  five  districts  in  Andhra  Pradesh:  East  Godavari  (13),  Mahbubnagar  (25),  Nalgonda  (26),  West  Godavari  (26),  and  Prakasam  (3).  The  other  states  in  India  covered  through  partnerships  include  Madhya  Pradesh,  Assam,  Bihar,  Rajasthan  and  Uttar  Pradesh  (Figure 11).  Figure 11: Scojo presence in India and Andhra Pradesh  Six of Scojo’s key partnerships are described below:  • Drishtee is a rapidly growing, rural franchise network that provides computer training and  Internet  kiosks  to  villages.  Drishtee  currently  reaches  over  fifteen  million  people  through  more  than  1,000  Kiosks  in  nine  states.  Drishtee  recruits,  trains  and  supports  local  village  entrepreneurs, and encourages them to offer additional products and services from the kiosks  to  diversify  and  increase  their  income.  Through  its  partnership  with  Scojo,  36  Drishtee  entrepreneurs  have  received  training  and  currently  sell  eyeglasses  to  villagers  from  their   
  30. 30. Current partners in India 25 What Works: Scojo India Foundation kiosks,  and  over  300  entrepreneurs  are  expected  to  join  the  program  by  the  end  of  2007.  Depending  on  the  type  of  eyeglasses  sold,  these  entrepreneurs  pay  Drishtee  approximately  Rs.  12  per  pair  of  Scojo  glasses  for  program  support.    The  entrepreneur  keeps  the  balance  (~Rs. 43) as profit, representing one of the highest margin products in their portfolio (at 26%).   Drishtee’s  portfolio  approach  is  designed  to  profitably  support  entrepreneurs,  and  this  revenue sharing model with entrepreneurs for Scojo products is a strong fit.  • Vedanta Resources is one of the largest metals and mining groups in India, and is committed  to  managing  its  business  in  a  socially  responsible  manner.  As  part  of  its  corporate  social  responsibility  (CSR)  initiatives,  Vedanta  has  developed  a  network  of  Community  Health  Workers (“CHW”) to provide basic services in villages where miners live. In partnership with  Scojo,  Vedanta  has  provided  training  and  support  to  more  than  60  CHWs  to  do  vision  screenings and sell eyeglasses in villages. Vedanta’s CSR program fully funds the overhead  costs of the program, so Vedanta entrepreneurs keep 100% of the profits they generate.  • The  Byrraju  Foundation  seeks  to  build  progressive  self‐reliant  rural  communities  by  providing  services  in  the  areas  of  healthcare,  environment,  sanitation,  primary  education,  adult literacy and skills development. The Foundation currently works in 152 villages in five  districts  of  Andhra  Pradesh,  impacting  more  than  800,000  people.  Scojo  helped  Byrraju  expand its product portfolio and currently has 140 CHWs selling Scojo eyeglasses.  • Hindustan  Lever’s  Project  Shakti  promotes  income  generation  for  rural  underprivileged  women  by  providing  small‐scale  enterprise  opportunities.  Today,  Project  Shakti  has  nearly  30,000 women entrepreneurs selling Hindustan Lever products such as soaps and shampoos.  Scojo  has  partnered  with  Hindustan  Lever  to  train  the  women  entrepreneurs  to  do  vision  screenings and integrate eyeglasses into their enterprise product offering.  • L.V. Prasad Eye Institute (LVPEI) is the largest eye care provider in Andhra Pradesh and one  of the preeminent eye care facilities in the world, providing equitable and efficient services to  underserved  populations.  LVPEI’s  growing  statewide  network  of  Vision  Guardians  will  be  trained  by  LVPEI  in  basic  eye  health  and  will  sell  Scojo  eyeglasses  or  refer  patients  into  LVPEI’s statewide system of local eye care clinics and hospitals. As a key part of the state’s   
  31. 31. Success of partnership strategy 26 What Works: Scojo India Foundation Vision  2020  Initiative,  the  program  will  quickly  grow  to  serve  all  70  million  citizens  of  Andhra  Pradesh.  LVPEI  and  Scojo  have  been  partners  since  2001  when  the  reading  glass  distribution  model  using  rural  micro‐ entrepreneurs  was  first  implemented.  Dr.  Rao,  the  Director  of  LVPEI,  has  had  a  professional  relationship  with  Scojo’s  Chairman for many years and serves on the  Advisory Board of Scojo Foundation.  • BASIX  is  a  micro‐credit  organization  promoting  sustainable  livelihoods  through  the provision of financial services and technical assistance to the rural poor. BASIX currently  works  with  over  190,000  households  in  44  districts  and  8  states.  In  partnership  with  Scojo,  BASIX plans to extend its service offering to include Scojo vision training and entrepreneur  support.  4.3 Success of partnership strategy  Partnerships  have  come  to  represent  the  most  important  channel  for  Scojo.  Scalable,  efficient  growth  depends on Scojo’s ability to leverage the network and infrastructure of other organizations. In order to  continue to be successful, Scojo must offer a lucrative value proposition to each partner.  The key strengths in Scojo’s partnership strategy today include:  • With no other organization offering low‐cost, high quality reading glasses in villages, Scojo is  strategically positioned as a first mover and the sole distributor.  • Partners find the 30‐35% profit margin on Scojo products a very attractive prospect to offer  entrepreneurs  in  their  networks.  This  unusually  high  margin  enables  the  partner  to  charge  entrepreneurs  a  small  fee to  cover  their  operating  expenses,  while  leaving  the entrepreneur  with a meaningful income (e.g., Drishtee).   
  32. 32. Success of partnership strategy 27 What Works: Scojo India Foundation • In  areas  where  distribution  is  often  challenging,  Scojo  offers  a  reliable  supply  of  reading  glasses to district‐level coordinators  • Scojo has demonstrated its flexibility and accommodated varying partner requirements, such  as  modifying  training  programs,  adjusting  micro‐franchise  kit  contents  and  startup  costs,  negotiating minimum revenue agreements, and providing occasional operating support.  However, Scojo faces several strategic challenges, as addressed in Section 5.4. These challenges need to be  addressed in order for Scojo to continue to grow with existing and new partners.   
  33. 33. Challenges 28 What Works: Scojo India Foundation Chapter 5  Challenges  Like  many  young  organizations,  Scojo  faces  many  challenges  to  continue  its  growth  and  success.  However, the organization has proactively developed strategies to mitigate these risks and continues to  seek ways to minimize any potential threats to the success of their model.  5.1 Introduction  Scojo  India  Foundation’s  revenue  sources  are  from  reading  glasses  sales,  grants  and  loans.  With  operations in India having started in January 2005, Scojo anticipates beginning to make a profit in 2010  assuming  key  volume  growth  targets  as  detailed  in  Appendix  B  and  Appendix  C.  However,  recent  performance suggests that these targets may be too aggressive. The key challenges, as described in this  chapter, in our opinion present important hurdles to achieving breakeven by 2010.  In  order  to  achieve  its  2010  targets,  Scojo  will  have  to  increase  its  sales  of  glasses  very  aggressively.  Indeed,  as  detailed  below  its  current  forecasts  project  a  doubling  of  number  of  glasses  sold  in  each  channel  year‐on‐year.  To  achieve  growth  in  the  VE  channel,  there  will  need  to  be  an  increase  in  sales  turnover  per  entrepreneur.  With  a  cost  of  Rs.  25,000  ($556)  per  month  for  each  District  Coordinator  (including  travel),  each  of  a  Coordinator’s  20‐25  Vision  Entrepreneurs  must  sell  30  pairs  of  eyeglasses  each month for Scojo to break even. This target represents a substantial increase from the current average  of  15‐20  pairs.  To  achieve  this,  Scojo  may  need  new  incentive  systems,  improved  sales  practices  or  reduced support levels.    
  34. 34. Introduction 29 What Works: Scojo India Foundation Num ber of glasses sold Scojo VE's Partnerships Wholesale 800,000 700,000 135,600 600,000 500,000 400,000 88,200 328,500 300,000 51,600 232,875 200,000 25,800 151,875 246,400 100,000 83,250 11,400 135,240 34,200 48,300 82,080 0 21,816 2005 2006E 2007E 2008E 2009E 2010E   Figure 12: Projections of glasses sold in different distribution channels  At the same time, the number of Vision Entrepreneurs will have to increase significantly. We will discuss  later  in  this  chapter  how  this  growth  might  be  hampered  by  several  challenges.  In  addition,  new  partnerships will be critical to support the growth in the partnership channel. As will be discussed in the  next section, there are several threats to the potential of this aggressive growth.  Cash flow from operations (USD) 150,000 106,925 100,000 50,000 -16,978 -5,840 0 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 -50,000 -100,000 -96,492 -150,000 -150,714 -200,000   Figure 13: Forecasted cash flow from operations     
  35. 35. Partnerships 30 What Works: Scojo India Foundation 5.2 Partnerships  Scojo’s rapid growth has been facilitated by an aggressive and successful partnership strategy, but four  key elements need to be incorporated into Scojo’s strategy to continue this trajectory:  • Convince  partners  to  pay  for  and  commit  resources  to  operating  and  supporting  Scojo  programs within their networks by:  o Justifying the incremental expenses to strictly breakeven‐oriented organizations, such as  micro‐credit institutions, and  o Creating  a  mission‐oriented  case  for  charity  and  non‐profit  organizations  assuming  the  cost out of their own funds;  • Ensure proper motivation and product emphasis by the partner’s entrepreneur, particularly  when Scojo is part of a larger suite of products (e.g., Drishtee);  • Develop a financially and organizationally sustainable level of involvement by Scojo staff in  ensuring adequate support of entrepreneurs by program partners; and  • Motivate partners to honor their commitments and continue sourcing eyeglasses from Scojo  rather than an alternate source.  To  support  the  aggressive  growth  targets  Scojo  has  set,  it  will  have  to  overcome  some  important  challenges.  • Scojo  will  have  to  carefully  manage  the  current  diversity  in  its  partner  portfolio.  CSR  organizations  are  strategically  different  from  microfinance  partners  and  require  a  different  value proposition. Either Scojo has to tailor its proposition to each specific partner or focus its  strategy in a more structured value proposition.  • While  microfinance  organization  such  as  Basix  or  SKS  Microfinance  represent  significant  potential as partners, Scojo will have to think through the reservations these partners might  have in getting too heavily involved in suggesting or managing the business their clients run.  These  partners  might  limit  themselves  to  purely  financing  activities,  avoiding  any  involvement beyond that.   
  36. 36. Recruiting entrepreneurs 31 What Works: Scojo India Foundation • To  enhance  the  value  proposition  for  its  partners,  Scojo  will  have  to  increase  its  efforts  to  build  a  strong  brand  name.  As  their  brand  awareness  is  currently  limited,  the  strength  of  current  partner  relationships  and  the  potential  for  future  relationships  is  vulnerable  to  stronger brands launching similar programs.  For example, Titan Industries (a popular Tata  Group‐backed manufacturer of watches and jewelry) recently announced the launch of Titan  Eye+,  to  provide  prescription  eyeglasses  to  the  mid‐priced  market25.    While  this  does  not  directly compete in Scojo’s target market, Titan’s brand name may be leveraged in the future  to  penetrate  Scojo’s  market.  Similar  to  current  customers  paying  a  premium  for  Scojo’s  fancier models, future customers may pay an additional premium for the Titan brand name.   • Keeping partners motivated and interested in boosting Scojo related sales requires dedicated  staff to cultivate partnerships. Currently, continuous management of partnerships is limited  as there is no dedicated staff. This results in partners loosing interest in the program, leading  to decreasing sales.  5.3 Recruiting entrepreneurs  Most Scojo entrepreneurs are required to pay a deposit for startup kits to begin the program. SVEs pay  Rs. 500 ($11) for their kits and receive eyeglasses on consignment. With a profit margin of Rs. 55 ($1.22)  per pair of glasses, they need to sell nine pairs before they breakeven. However, other entrepreneurs pay  significantly  more,  depending  on  the  partner  agreement.  For  example,  Drishtee  entrepreneurs  pay  Rs.  2100 ($47) for their kits. With a profit margin of approximately Rs. 40 ($0.89) per pair (after the Drishtee  fees), they need to sell over 52 pairs of glasses before they breakeven. Due to capital constraints among  the target population, many potential entrepreneurs cannot participate in Scojo’s program.  Scojo has tested several solutions to overcome this hurdle. Some partners pay outright or provide loans to  mitigate  this  problem.  Others  have  negotiated  smaller  kits,  reducing  the  size  and  financial  burden  on  their  entrepreneurs.  However,  the  most  successful  approach  has  been  simply  to  demonstrate  the  profitability  of  being  a  VE.  Scojo  found  that  if  convinced,  many  entrepreneurs  are  able  to  raise  the                                                              25  Tata Group. “Press Release: Titan Industries launches Titan Eye+.” http://www.tata.com/titan/releases/20070331_titan_eye.htm.   

×